Author Topic: BakingBusiness.com Article Excerpts--Fiber  (Read 1369 times)

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Offline Pete-zza

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BakingBusiness.com Article Excerpts--Fiber
« on: September 11, 2009, 10:36:59 AM »
In the interest of keeping our members abreast of the latest developments in ingredients that can be used in pizza doughs, I have copied and pasted belows excerpts from an article from BakingBusiness.com that discusses the potential use of ingredients rich in fiber in baked goods, including pizzas.

Fruitful fiber options
Citrus sources may provide fiber and texture to baked foods
(Bakingbusiness.com, September 08, 2009)
by Jeff Gelski

Robert Johnson, president, owner and co-founder of Natural Citrus Products Corp., LaBelle, Fla., said his company is preparing for a "tsunami" of orders for the company’s CitraFiber ingredient.

"We are on the verge of taking this company from obscurity into the limelight in a matter of days," he said.

Pizza crust, bread, buns and rolls are some of the potential applications for CitraFiber, just one example of how fiber sourced from fruit is appearing in grain-based foods.

Consumers are showing interest in fiber-rich products. In the 2009 IFIC Foundation Food and Health Survey, 37% of respondents put fiber among the top three "potentially beneficial components" they want in foods and beverages, and 79% said they were trying to consume more fiber. Cogent Research, Cambridge, Mass., conducted the survey, which was filled out by 1,064 respondents, on behalf of the IFIC.

A use for citrus peel

Making pizza crust more nutritious is a primary benefit of CitraFiber, which is sourced from citrus peels. Previously, citrus peels mainly were used in cattle feed, Mr. Johnson said. His company now uses a patent-pending process to remove the oils and sugars naturally from citrus peels, which makes them available for use in foods.

The resulting CitraFiber is 83% fiber (50% insoluble and 33% soluble), and it offers a high amount of pectin and good water-holding capacity. Products may attain good source or excellent source of fiber status when CitraFiber is added to them, Mr. Johnson said.

His company has added CitraFiber at levels up to 5% in pizza crust.

"We can put up to 10% or 12%, but the material gets really heavy because you have to add so much water," Mr. Johnson said.

Work at R&R Research Services, Inc., Manhattan, Kas., involved adding CitraFiber to white pan bread, hamburger buns and pizza crust.

In white pan bread, CitraFiber was added in dough at levels of 1.5%, 2.5% and 3.5%. It was added either dry or hydrated. The water level increased by 6%, 11% and 18% for addition levels of CitraFiber at 1.5%, 2.5% and 3.5%, respectively. Based on volume and crumb grain characteristics, CitraFiber added at 2.5% in the dry powder form was selected as the optimum choice.

The hamburger buns involved a commercial sponge-and-dough formula. CitraFiber was added dry up to 2.5% with the dough ingredients. Water absorption increased 11%. The buns were similar in appearance, height and crumb grain to hamburger buns made without CitraFiber.

In pizza crust, CitraFiber was added dry up to 2.5%. Researchers observed no difference in diameter, thickness or crumb grain between crusts made with CitraFiber and crusts made without it.


Peter






Offline UnConundrum

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Re: BakingBusiness.com Article Excerpts--Fiber
« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2009, 08:10:11 PM »
Quote
In pizza crust, CitraFiber was added dry up to 2.5%. Researchers observed no difference in diameter, thickness or crumb grain between crusts made with CitraFiber and crusts made without it.

Hmmmm, but they don't comment on taste.


 

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