Author Topic: My first post after lurking for two years... and a female no less!  (Read 4104 times)

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Offline VancityAllie

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Hello everyone!

It's been two years now that I have been reading these forums... lurking in the shadows! You guys are my heroes! I have marveled at the photos of different dough, techniques, starters, and all the experiments you all have been conducting for many years.

I've also noticed these forums are very male heavy! So hopefully no one minds that I am asking for advice!  :-[

I am no pizza expert... I've been making "home pizzas" for a while now, but more along the lines of what you would see on Martha Stewart or Epicurious. I think it is time to get serious!

I have read many of the "main" threads for beginner's and newbies, and read many posts by those like Pete, varasano, artigiano, pizzanapoletana...

Here's the problem though. I'm not quite ready to dive into the craziness that is starters, etc. So I was hoping you could help me start by making as authentic as possible a Neapolitan-style pizza dough (in my eyes, slightly crispy crust on the outside, bubbles on the inside of the dough and slightly chewy) with the ingredients I have access to in a home oven. I am planning on using the recipe on Forno Bravo's site but need a little help with adjustments:

  • I have a convection oven that can go to 550 degrees F and a pizza stone.
  • I cannot seem to find Caputo flour anywhere in Vancouver so I am using Divella Farina Tipo '00' Pizza Flour.
  • I would like to use fresh yeast.
  • I would like to do an overnight refrigeration method rather than a room temperature rise.

Can anyone help me modify this recipe (fornobravo.com/pizza/pizza_dough.html) with the above constraints? Please help! It would mean so much to me looking to get into pizza making.

It would be SO helpful. And! I PROMISE promise promise I will post photos as soon as I make the pizza :)

Thank you everyone for your help in advance, and also thanks so much for all the fun and insightful reading over the past couple years!

Allie


Offline norma427

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Re: My first post after lurking for two years... and a female no less!
« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2009, 06:43:31 AM »
VancityAllie,
Welcome to the forum.  I am also a female and everyone is friendly, here.  They have all taken their time to help me with everything.
Sorry I don't know that much about making Neapolitan-style pizza.  I don't think a convection oven will work though in making this style of pizza. 
Will let the experts help you though the process. 
Looking forward to seeing your pics.
Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline Matthew

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Re: My first post after lurking for two years... and a female no less!
« Reply #2 on: December 29, 2009, 07:40:49 AM »
Hello everyone!

It's been two years now that I have been reading these forums... lurking in the shadows! You guys are my heroes! I have marveled at the photos of different dough, techniques, starters, and all the experiments you all have been conducting for many years.

I've also noticed these forums are very male heavy! So hopefully no one minds that I am asking for advice!  :-[

I am no pizza expert... I've been making "home pizzas" for a while now, but more along the lines of what you would see on Martha Stewart or Epicurious. I think it is time to get serious!

I have read many of the "main" threads for beginner's and newbies, and read many posts by those like Pete, varasano, artigiano, pizzanapoletana...

Here's the problem though. I'm not quite ready to dive into the craziness that is starters, etc. So I was hoping you could help me start by making as authentic as possible a Neapolitan-style pizza dough (in my eyes, slightly crispy crust on the outside, bubbles on the inside of the dough and slightly chewy) with the ingredients I have access to in a home oven. I am planning on using the recipe on Forno Bravo's site but need a little help with adjustments:

  • I have a convection oven that can go to 550 degrees F and a pizza stone.
  • I cannot seem to find Caputo flour anywhere in Vancouver so I am using Divella Farina Tipo '00' Pizza Flour.
  • I would like to use fresh yeast.
  • I would like to do an overnight refrigeration method rather than a room temperature rise.

Can anyone help me modify this recipe (fornobravo.com/pizza/pizza_dough.html) with the above constraints? Please help! It would mean so much to me looking to get into pizza making.

It would be SO helpful. And! I PROMISE promise promise I will post photos as soon as I make the pizza :)

Thank you everyone for your help in advance, and also thanks so much for all the fun and insightful reading over the past couple years!

Allie

Hi Allie,
I use almost exclusively Caputo flour but have used Divella in the past & it's okay.  I can tell you where to get Caputo flour in your area if you are interested in purchasing a 25kg bag.
Like you, there are many people who have tried to make Neapolitan pizza in their home oven & the end result is always less than satisfactory.  You will never get the proper browning & texture that you are looking for.  Instead you will end up with a very pale & crackery crust.  I don't mean to discourage you & you can definitely give it a shot if you like.  If your planning on using the formula from the forno bravo website, my recommendation is that you drop the hydration to about 58%.

Good luck,
Matt

Offline Essen1

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Re: My first post after lurking for two years... and a female no less!
« Reply #3 on: December 29, 2009, 08:18:19 PM »
Hi Allie,

Welcome aboard!

I have to agree with Matt. I tried using Caputo 00 Pizzeria flour in a home oven setting many times and the outcome was less than stellar. A home oven just can't produce the heat the flour needs in order to produce a great Neapolitan pizza.

I think from what you described and are looking, it sounds more like a rustic version of a NY-style pizza. If that's the case, I'd go with a strong bread flour, a hydration of around 63% - give or take a point - and perhaps use a 3-hr poolish before making the final dough.

I made one last night, actually, by accident to be honest but I liked it very much. If you like, I could come up with a modified formula that includes fresh yeast. Here's a couple of pics to illustrate what I'm talking about.

Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Offline VancityAllie

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Re: My first post after lurking for two years... and a female no less!
« Reply #4 on: December 29, 2009, 08:58:08 PM »
Hi everyone,

Thanks for your help. Matthew -- I would love to know where to buy a large bag of Caputo in Vancouver. Please let me know!

I realize that a convection oven won't do very well to start, but I'd like to give it a few tries in the oven before investing in an expensive WFO.

Can anyone help me figure out the fresh yeast amount and the hydration amount for what I am looking for?

THANK YOU! :)

Offline Matthew

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Re: My first post after lurking for two years... and a female no less!
« Reply #5 on: December 30, 2009, 06:28:58 AM »
Hi everyone,

Thanks for your help. Matthew -- I would love to know where to buy a large bag of Caputo in Vancouver. Please let me know!

I realize that a convection oven won't do very well to start, but I'd like to give it a few tries in the oven before investing in an expensive WFO.

Can anyone help me figure out the fresh yeast amount and the hydration amount for what I am looking for?

THANK YOU! :)

You can find the information @ http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,9888.0.html.  I don't use my WFO in the winter time & still use Caputo quite frequently.  It's by far my flour of choice.  It's excellent for pizza in teglia (pan pizza), focaccia, deep dish & pizza fritta.

Matt

Offline Matthew

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Re: My first post after lurking for two years... and a female no less!
« Reply #6 on: December 30, 2009, 06:33:05 AM »
Hi Allie,

Welcome aboard!

I have to agree with Matt. I tried using Caputo 00 Pizzeria flour in a home oven setting many times and the outcome was less than stellar. A home oven just can't produce the heat the flour needs in order to produce a great Neapolitan pizza.

I think from what you described and are looking, it sounds more like a rustic version of a NY-style pizza. If that's the case, I'd go with a strong bread flour, a hydration of around 63% - give or take a point - and perhaps use a 3-hr poolish before making the final dough.

I made one last night, actually, by accident to be honest but I liked it very much. If you like, I could come up with a modified formula that includes fresh yeast. Here's a couple of pics to illustrate what I'm talking about.



Hey Mike,
Merry Christmas & Happy New Year Bro!  Great Looking pies as always.  It's the new mixer isn't it  ;)

Take Care,
Matt

Offline VancityAllie

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Re: My first post after lurking for two years... and a female no less!
« Reply #7 on: December 30, 2009, 09:32:04 PM »
Hi Matthew! Thanks for the tip on the flour. I will try to contact them to purchase the Caputo...

In the meantime, can anyone help with the below? Please? :)

I realize that a convection oven won't do very well to start, but I'd like to give it a few tries in the oven before investing in an expensive WFO.

Can anyone help me figure out the fresh yeast amount and the hydration amount for what I am looking for?

Offline Matthew

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Re: My first post after lurking for two years... and a female no less!
« Reply #8 on: December 31, 2009, 07:07:40 AM »
Hi Matthew! Thanks for the tip on the flour. I will try to contact them to purchase the Caputo...

In the meantime, can anyone help with the below? Please? :)


I don't recall if there's a formula on the Divella bag.  The absorption rate for Divell 00 pizza flour is 54-56%; that being said, you can give this formula a try & you should be just fine. http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,9065.0.html  You may want to add some oil in the dough 1-2%.

Matt


 

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