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Offline itsinthesauce

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Roman Pizzas
« on: February 25, 2005, 10:38:38 AM »
Here are some pics of Pizzas from Rome. A friend og mine is out there attending school and says they are great. He also talks of a pizza like dish called a Stuppli. Anyone ever here of it?


Offline itsinthesauce

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Re: Roman Pizzas
« Reply #1 on: February 25, 2005, 10:39:16 AM »
Another one.

Offline itsinthesauce

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Re: Roman Pizzas
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2005, 10:39:50 AM »
Last one.

Offline D.C. Pizza Master

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Re: Roman Pizzas
« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2005, 04:02:22 PM »
these are not roman pizzas

they are called Pizza al taglio and they originated from Sicily


the pizza al taglio also has a thicker crust yet very chewy with a heavier toppings...you normaly find these kinds of pizzas in cafes, bars, etc..etc...its the italian version of grabbing a quick slice to go

Offline itsinthesauce

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Re: Roman Pizzas
« Reply #4 on: February 25, 2005, 07:03:02 PM »
Whatever, they look good. And, according to my friend, taste good. So what are Roman Pizzas?

Offline D.C. Pizza Master

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Re: Roman Pizzas
« Reply #5 on: February 25, 2005, 11:07:50 PM »
Whatever, they look good. And, according to my friend, taste good. So what are Roman Pizzas?

Roman pizzas dont exist....the pizzas that your friend enjoys eating are called Pizza Al Taglio(al taglio means "cut")

you see in Italy there are 3 main kind of pizzas that are offered

Pizza Italiana (which is the most popular pizza)
Pizza Napoletana (mosty relegated to Napoli)
Pizza Al Taglio (which is described in your pics)

Offline itsinthesauce

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Re: Roman Pizzas
« Reply #6 on: February 26, 2005, 04:02:11 PM »
Thanks for the lesson.....learn something new every time I'm on this site. Did you notice the meat based pizza. What is that...a type of salami?

Offline D.C. Pizza Master

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Re: Roman Pizzas
« Reply #7 on: February 26, 2005, 04:38:35 PM »
Thanks for the lesson.....learn something new every time I'm on this site. Did you notice the meat based pizza. What is that...a type of salami?


yes thats a type of salami..buts being that there are so many different kinds..its impossible for me to look at the picture and guess which kind it is

im guessing its a soppressata

Offline itsinthesauce

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Re: Roman Pizzas
« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2005, 04:47:51 PM »
I think you are right. Lo-cal, no dought.

Offline pizzanapoletana

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Re: Roman Pizzas
« Reply #9 on: February 28, 2005, 02:05:46 PM »
Roman pizzas dont exist....the pizzas that your friend enjoys eating are called Pizza Al Taglio(al taglio means "cut")

you see in Italy there are 3 main kind of pizzas that are offered

Pizza Italiana (which is the most popular pizza)
Pizza Napoletana (mosty relegated to Napoli)
Pizza Al Taglio (which is described in your pics)

Sorry but I do not agere with you about the terminology above and on the fact that Roman Pizza doesn't exist.

What you mean by pizza Italiana? Do you know that the round pizza was not found outside NAples til after the second world war? It was  only then that Neapolitan which emigrated to the centre and north of Italy, started opening pizza places. Unfotunately, not having the traditional artisans building the Neapolitan wood burning ovens, they had to use a different oven so the pizza got thinner and crispier.
All the rest of flat breas, were very much available around italy and where made in different way. These were comonly called Focaccias.


Offline D.C. Pizza Master

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Re: Roman Pizzas
« Reply #10 on: February 28, 2005, 02:56:08 PM »
Sorry but I do not agere with you about the terminology above and on the fact that Roman Pizza doesn't exist.

What you mean by pizza Italiana? Do you know that the round pizza was not found outside NAples til after the second world war? It was  only then that Neapolitan which emigrated to the centre and north of Italy, started opening pizza places. Unfotunately, not having the traditional artisans building the Neapolitan wood burning ovens, they had to use a different oven so the pizza got thinner and crispier.
All the rest of flat breas, were very much available around italy and where made in different way. These were comonly called Focaccias.


pizza was born in Naples but for your information...NOW...neapolitan pizza is mostly relegated to NAPLES itself and to any neapolita who wants to open up a neapolitan pizzeria oustide of the city...but MOST of italy offers Pizza Italiana which is  12 to 13 inch pizza which has a thinner crust and has lower borders..your eating less bread but have more toppings then you would with a neapolitan pizza

Roman pizza?  you think an italian in italy will know what your talking about if you ask them for a roman pizza?

Offline pizzanapoletana

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Re: Roman Pizzas
« Reply #11 on: February 28, 2005, 06:57:36 PM »

pizza was born in Naples but for your information...NOW...neapolitan pizza is mostly relegated to NAPLES itself and to any neapolita who wants to open up a neapolitan pizzeria oustide of the city...but MOST of italy offers Pizza Italiana which is  12 to 13 inch pizza which has a thinner crust and has lower borders..your eating less bread but have more toppings then you would with a neapolitan pizza

Roman pizza?  you think an italian in italy will know what your talking about if you ask them for a roman pizza?

I am Italian, and I was born and grown up in there. It is only 6 years that I have left the country, but I still spend at least 30 days a year in Italy.
Nobody talk about "pizza italiana" in Italy. They call it either "Pizza alla napoletana" (nothing to do with the DOC regulation) because it is cooked in a hot wood burning oven and serve it whole in a plate or since the law has been approved, I heard the word "pizza al piatto".
All over Italy taste changes and they preferred thinner or overcooked, but neapolitan pizza is still the benchmark against all other are measured. If you look for a job as a pizzaiolo, and you are from Naples, they are more likely to pay you more... Trust me this is from experience.

Pizza alla romana (o in teglia) find it's best expression in pizza bianca also known as focaccia patate e rosmarino. The dough is made in a different way, it is baked in a different way and the final result it is completely different from any other baking product. Roman pizza is made with a unique dough method which involves a phase called "rigeneri" and use percentage close to 110% flour to 100% water....

Offline itsinthesauce

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Re: Roman Pizzas
« Reply #12 on: February 28, 2005, 11:19:33 PM »
Guys, I'm sorry I even named this forum "Roman Pizzas" . The 21 year old kid that sent me the pictures did so. The main reason for the photos was to share with all of us the baker's pizzas so we all could share.

Offline D.C. Pizza Master

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Re: Roman Pizzas
« Reply #13 on: February 28, 2005, 11:43:14 PM »
I am Italian, and I was born and grown up in there. It is only 6 years that I have left the country, but I still spend at least 30 days a year in Italy.
Nobody talk about "pizza italiana" in Italy. They call it either "Pizza alla napoletana" (nothing to do with the DOC regulation) because it is cooked in a hot wood burning oven and serve it whole in a plate or since the law has been approved, I heard the word "pizza al piatto".
All over Italy taste changes and they preferred thinner or overcooked, but neapolitan pizza is still the benchmark against all other are measured. If you look for a job as a pizzaiolo, and you are from Naples, they are more likely to pay you more... Trust me this is from experience.

Pizza alla romana (o in teglia) find it's best expression in pizza bianca also known as focaccia patate e rosmarino. The dough is made in a different way, it is baked in a different way and the final result it is completely different from any other baking product. Roman pizza is made with a unique dough method which involves a phase called "rigeneri" and use percentage close to 110% flour to 100% water....



i attended pizza school in italy and worked in a pizzeria in tuscany?

i am a pizzaiolo

im here to educate...not to get into a argument over pride? you know what im saying man?

you can either accept what im saying or not...im only stating the facts

Offline itsinthesauce

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Re: Roman Pizzas
« Reply #14 on: March 01, 2005, 08:28:46 AM »
Thanks for your reply. There actually is a "Pizza School"? Tell us more about it, if you don't mind.

Offline pizzanapoletana

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Re: Roman Pizzas
« Reply #15 on: March 01, 2005, 04:18:51 PM »
Pizza schools exist mainly for foreign people. Italian, which do not have any other way to learn the basics do attend them too. I have many friends that attend both courses in Rome and Carole (near Venice), and they confirm that, all it was taught was the basic.

It is not a matter of accepting or not what you said. It is certainly not a matter of pride.

What you said are not fact, maybe misinformation they give you at the pizza school. State the bibliography or your sources and then we can start a proper discussion.

Do you really think that by attending a pizza school and working in ONE pizzeria in Tuscany, would give more knowledge that an Italian, which has grown up in the pizza business???

I can also tell you that until the beginning of 1900, the word "PIZZA" was not included in the most popular Italian dictionary(Della Crusca), because according to the authors it was a word only typical of Naples.

you also need to know that in Italy there are many association that offer pizza courses and each of them is in competition to attract more students, especially foreigners, thus they'll convince you that their methods are the better.

Offline D.C. Pizza Master

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Re: Roman Pizzas
« Reply #16 on: March 01, 2005, 10:29:56 PM »
Pizza schools exist mainly for foreign people. Italian, which do not have any other way to learn the basics do attend them too. I have many friends that attend both courses in Rome and Carole (near Venice), and they confirm that, all it was taught was the basic.

It is not a matter of accepting or not what you said. It is certainly not a matter of pride.

What you said are not fact, maybe misinformation they give you at the pizza school. State the bibliography or your sources and then we can start a proper discussion.

Do you really think that by attending a pizza school and working in ONE pizzeria in Tuscany, would give more knowledge that an Italian, which has grown up in the pizza business???

I can also tell you that until the beginning of 1900, the word "PIZZA" was not included in the most popular Italian dictionary(Della Crusca), because according to the authors it was a word only typical of Naples.

you also need to know that in Italy there are many association that offer pizza courses and each of them is in competition to attract more students, especially foreigners, thus they'll convince you that their methods are the better.


im italian as well

yes i went to Caorle and i attended Scuola Italiana Pizzaioli..and i learned the basics..the proper methods where i can make a pizza dough that comes out perfect every single time ...but then i expanded my knowledge by working in Tuscany  under Danilo Pagano....captain of the Pizza National Acrobat Team and who has made pizzas since age 13...ok?....he's the best....and he and all his pizza master associates call it Pizza Italiana..thats my source..so you can call it what you want..we can agree to disagree...you can call every pizza Pizza Napoletana if you want too...thats your choice

Offline pizzanapoletana

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Re: Roman Pizzas
« Reply #17 on: March 02, 2005, 07:24:07 AM »
I would never dream to call every pizza a Pizza Napoletana.

You just confirm my suspect! One master, on learning methods. That school has the interest of calling a PIzza Italiana,  whatever it is not Italian. I am not disputing that Danilo Pagano may be good, but saying he is a best is a bit overestimating... How many italian pizzamaker have you ssen working???

Natianal Acrobat Team??? I do not think that pizzamaker in Italy are measured on their acrobatic skills!

Are you Italian? If it so, and you had the chance to travel around Italy, you would know that there is not such a thing as Pizza Italiana. Every region has their interpretation of what a pizza is: More crispy or more thinner then other etc...
Until 10 years ago, then, everywhere a pizza baked in a wood burning oven was called Pizza Napoletana and that is a fact!

If we then start talking about focaccia, then we can explain the difference from the Sicilian one, Roman and Ligurian for example...

By the way I have been making pizza since I was a kid, but I would never dream of saying that I am the best one.

Can I give you one tip? Start using word like "in my opinion is the best...or " for what my experience is, I believe..."

Offline pftaylor

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Re: Roman Pizzas
« Reply #18 on: March 02, 2005, 07:42:42 AM »
DC PM, pizzanapoletana,
I have been reading your recent posts with great interest. As an Italian American I need to ask you both a question and a favor: Can't we all just get along?

I respect and admire each of you but this topic is not worth arguing over. You are both right. It seems to me that both of you have some merit to your position and let's leave it at that. I do not want to see either of you leave because you both add greatly to our special community.

Now, could we get back to discussing ways to reproduce great pizza? For instance, would either of you have any insight into the recipes of the great pizza houses in Italy? I have all the tools to produce great Italian pizza yet I do not have the knowledge to do so. I would also be interested in thoughts on a biga started with Caputo 00 flour. Have you ever heard of anyone successfully starting a biga with Caputo 00? Do the great pizza houses of Italy use a biga? If not, how do they get their great taste?
 
« Last Edit: March 02, 2005, 07:44:22 AM by pftaylor »
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Offline itsinthesauce

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Re: Roman Pizzas
« Reply #19 on: March 02, 2005, 09:27:20 AM »
PF, well said. I think that both of you have tremendous knowledge that can be shared. Let us pick your brains.


 

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