Author Topic: N.Y Style pizza dough in my bread machine help  (Read 3777 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline mayersob

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 6
N.Y Style pizza dough in my bread machine help
« on: December 10, 2009, 04:23:08 PM »
I am new to pizza making. I have been using  King Arthur bread flour,and IDY with the the dough setting on my bread machine (1-1/2hr.)then rolling the dough (I havn't been able to toss yet),and using a baking stone in my electric oven preheated to 500 degrees. The results aren't bad. I would like the best recipe for N.Y style pizza dough using my bread machine w/IDY for 1 or 2 12" pizzas. Thank you.


Online Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 22126
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: N.Y Style pizza dough in my bread machine help
« Reply #1 on: December 10, 2009, 06:01:27 PM »
meyersob,

You might take a look at Reply 8 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5931.msg51034/topicseen.html#msg51034 where member Art discusses making a NY style dough in a bread machine. Using the expanded dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html, the corresponding dough recipe for a single 12" pizza is as follows:

Bread Flour* (100%):
Water (63%):
IDY (0.20%):
Salt (1.75%):
Olive Oil (2%):
Sugar (1%):
Total (167.95%):
190.91 g  |  6.73 oz | 0.42 lbs
120.27 g  |  4.24 oz | 0.27 lbs
0.38 g | 0.01 oz | 0 lbs | 0.13 tsp | 0.04 tbsp
3.34 g | 0.12 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.6 tsp | 0.2 tbsp
3.82 g | 0.13 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.85 tsp | 0.28 tbsp
1.91 g | 0.07 oz | 0 lbs | 0.48 tsp | 0.16 tbsp
320.63 g | 11.31 oz | 0.71 lbs | TF = 0.1
* Preferably King Arthur bread flour

For two 12" pizzas:

Bread Flour* (100%):
Water (63%):
IDY (0.20%):
Salt (1.75%):
Olive Oil (2%):
Sugar (1%):
Total (167.95%):
Single Ball:
381.82 g  |  13.47 oz | 0.84 lbs
240.54 g  |  8.48 oz | 0.53 lbs
0.76 g | 0.03 oz | 0 lbs | 0.25 tsp | 0.08 tbsp
6.68 g | 0.24 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.2 tsp | 0.4 tbsp
7.64 g | 0.27 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.7 tsp | 0.57 tbsp
3.82 g | 0.13 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.96 tsp | 0.32 tbsp
641.26 g | 22.62 oz | 1.41 lbs | TF = 0.1
320.63 g | 11.31 oz | 0.71 lbs
* Preferably King Arthur bread flour

As noted at Reply 8 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6401.msg54855/topicseen.html#msg54855, Art uses cold water from the refrigerator in making his dough. For other tips for making the NY style pizza dough in a bread machine, you might also take a look at the following posts: Reply 51 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,576.msg5486.html#msg5486 and Reply 260 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,576.msg17113.html#msg17113.

There are many other NY style dough recipes on the forum that can be converted to make two 12" pizzas if the recipes are in baker's percent format. You should be able to use the expanded dough calculator to do the conversions for any other recipe that strikes your interest. You can also make other selections of ingredients using that tool. For example, I believe that Art uses Kosher salt, whereas in the above dough formulations I specified ordinary salt.

Peter

Offline Steve973

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 56
  • Age: 41
  • Location: Baltimore, MD
  • I love brewing beer and making pizza!
Re: N.Y Style pizza dough in my bread machine help
« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2010, 10:27:18 PM »
I have used a bread machine to make my pizza dough, and I have also used a Kitechen Aid planetary mixer.  I definitely prefer the bread machine for making my pizza dough.  For some reason, the dough always seems to get hung up on the dough hook of the mixer, and I don't get the impression that it kneads thoroughly.  I never have these issues with the bread maker.  Additionally, it seems like there is nearly zero waste (bowl residue or whatever) in the bread maker.  I also use my bread maker on the dough setting, but I don't ever let it go for more than 20 minutes (maximum).  I allow it to knead, and when the dough ball takes on a smooth and satiny look, I stop the machine and form a tight dough ball, oil it, and let it rise (retarded in the fridge, or on the counter when I'm making an "emergency" dough, a.k.a. lack of planning).
"Right here, right now, from the very beginning, there is only one thing. Constantly clear and unexplained, having never been born and having never died, it cannot be named or described." - Zen Master So Sahn