Author Topic: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website  (Read 17053 times)

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Offline BTB

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New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« on: December 04, 2009, 11:10:16 AM »
I noted this new Chicago Deep-Dish Pizza recipe on the Cook's Illustrated website today.  It looked interesting except I am suspicious that a "copy-cat" or "cloned" recipe was used as the basis because of the incorrect addition of corn meal in the recipe.  As most of us on this site know, it has been proven time and time again that corn meal never has been part of the crust recipe of any of the great Chicago deep-dish pizzerias.  That is a myth that has been perpetuated for decades for some unknown reason and is a clear sign that one of the old "copy-cat" recipes that have long lingered on the internet, which have never been close to reality, was referred to when pulling together a Chicago deep-dish recipe. 
 
I will probably try this out sometime, minus the corn meal, which to me gives a very undesirable sandy and gritty texture to the crust unlike any Chicago deep-dish pizza that I have ever eaten. Also, I will use the traditional slices of cheese, rather than shredded cheese.  Strangely, in one section they advise against using "preshredded" cheese but the recipe itself calls for using shredded cheese.  In my experience, only the "stuffed" Chicago deep dish pizzerias, like Giordano's, use shredded cheeses.  But their recipe here is not for stuffed pizza.
 
The lamination technique describe herein and on their website looked interesting.  I remember Peter describing such in other recipes on this site.  But I truly have not witnessed nor believe it is practiced at the major Chicago deep dish pizzerias.  But it's interesting to see what the results may be.  Am anxious to hear from anyone who may try this out.  I don't know if this link will work, but check out at http://www.cooksillustrated.com/recipes/detail.asp?docid=21349
 
Chicago-Style Deep-Dish Pizza
 
Makes two 9-inch pizzas, serving 4 to 6.   Published January 1, 2010.   From Cook's Illustrated.

Place a damp kitchen towel under the mixer and watch it at all times during kneading to prevent it from wobbling off the counter. Handle the dough with slightly oiled hands, or it might stick. The test kitchen prefers Dragone Whole Milk Mozzarella; part-skim mozzarella can also be used, but avoid preshredded cheese, as it does not melt well. Our preferred brands of crushed tomatoes are Tuttorosso and Muir Glen. Grate the onion on the large holes of a box grater.

Ingredients

Dough 
3 1/4 cups (16 1/4 ounces) unbleached all-purpose flour 
1/2 cup (2 3/4 ounces) yellow cornmeal 
1 1/2 teaspoons table salt 
2 teaspoons sugar 
2 1/4 teaspoons instant or rapid-rise yeast 
1 1/4 cups water (10 ounces), room temperature
3 tablespoons unsalted butter , melted, plus 4 tablespoons, softened
1 teaspoon plus 4 tablespoons olive oil 

Sauce
2 tablespoons unsalted butter 
1/4 cup grated onion , from 1 medium onion
1/4 teaspoon dried oregano 
 Table salt 
2 medium garlic cloves , minced or pressed through garlic press (about 2 teaspoons)
1 (28-ounce) can crushed tomatoes 
1/4 teaspoon sugar 
2 tablespoons coarsely chopped fresh basil leaves 
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil 
 Ground black pepper 

Toppings
1 pound mozzarella cheese , shredded (about 4 cups) 
1/2 ounce grated Parmesan cheese (about 1/4 cup)
 
Instructions

1. FOR THE DOUGH: Mix flour, cornmeal, salt, sugar, and yeast in bowl of stand mixer fitted with dough hook on low speed until incorporated, about 1 minute. Add water and melted butter and mix on low speed until fully combined, 1 to 2 minutes, scraping sides and bottom of bowl occasionally. Increase speed to medium and knead until dough is glossy and smooth and pulls away from sides of bowl, 4 to 5 minutes. (Dough will only pull away from sides while mixer is on. When mixer is off, dough will fall back to sides.)

2. Using fingers, coat large bowl with 1 teaspoon olive oil, rubbing excess oil from fingers onto blade of rubber spatula. Using oiled spatula, transfer dough to bowl, turning once to oil top; cover tightly with plastic wrap. Let rise at room temperature until nearly doubled in volume, 45 to 60 minutes.

3. FOR THE SAUCE: While dough rises, heat butter in medium saucepan over medium heat until melted. Add onion, oregano, and 1/2 teaspoon salt; cook, stirring occasionally, until liquid has evaporated and onion is golden brown, about 5 minutes. Add garlic and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Stir in tomatoes and sugar, increase heat to high, and bring to simmer. Lower heat to medium-low and simmer until reduced to 2 1/2 cups, 25 to 30 minutes. Off heat, stir in basil and oil, then season with salt and pepper.

4. TO LAMINATE THE DOUGH: Adjust oven rack to lower position and heat oven to 425 degrees. Using rubber spatula, turn dough out onto dry work surface and roll into 15- by 12-inch rec-tangle. Using offset spatula, spread softened butter over surface of dough, leaving 1/2-inch border along edges. Starting at short end, roll dough into tight cylinder. With seam side down, flatten cylinder into 18- by 4-inch rectangle. Cut rectangle in half crosswise. Working with 1 half, fold into thirds like business letter; pinch seams together to form ball. Repeat with remaining half. Return balls to oiled bowl, cover tightly with plastic wrap, and let rise in refrigerator until nearly doubled in volume, 40 to 50 minutes.

5. Coat two 9-inch round cake pans with 2 tablespoons olive oil each. Transfer 1 dough ball to dry work surface and roll out into 13-inch disk about 1/4 inch thick. Transfer dough to pan by rolling dough loosely around rolling pin and unrolling into pan. Lightly press dough into pan, working into corners and 1 inch up sides. If dough resists stretching, let it relax 5 minutes before trying again. Repeat with remaining dough ball.

6. For each pizza, sprinkle 2 cups mozzarella evenly over surface of dough. Spread 1 1/4 cups tomato sauce over cheese and sprinkle 2 tablespoons Parmesan over sauce. Bake until crust is golden brown, 20 to 30 minutes. Remove pizza from oven and let rest 10 minutes before slicing and serving.


Offline loowaters

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2009, 11:20:07 AM »
I think the "Don't use pre-shredded cheese" refers to packaged shredded cheese which doesn't come together very well in a DD pie because of the cellulose used to reduce the clumping.  Nothing wrong with cellulose it just creates a barrier and doesn't allow for a solid mass of cheese to form under those toppings and sauce.  I've had no problems with it topping a traditional, cheese on top pizza.

I've got a buddy that uses preshreded and he'll bring in the leftovers to work and I'll tease him about cooking the crust, sauce, and toppings without melting the cheese.  "How do you do that?"  Pizzamaking.com username: "WrongSauce"!

Loo
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Offline vcb

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #2 on: December 04, 2009, 12:08:33 PM »
I love watching America's Test Kitchen, but I just gotta shake my head here.
Laminating the dough? Are we making pizza or croissants?

Even before you consider laminating, the instructions tell you to knead the dough for an ADDITIONAL 4 to 5 minutes after combining? That's WAY too much overworking of the dough.  You'll probably end up with a chewy risen dough, maybe something like a detroit or sicilian style.

There are so many things wrong with this Cooks Illustrated recipe, I wonder if they even bothered to consult anyone from Chicago about it.

If you survive this recipe, please post pics and your impressions.  :chef:
« Last Edit: December 04, 2009, 12:15:39 PM by vcb »
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Offline BTB

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2009, 12:45:17 PM »
vcb, you're right on many points, of course.  They seemed to be sensitive to the "bready" dough avoidance in their lead article to the recipe.  But I'm not sure the recipe/technique gets them there.  Also from Step No. 5 above, it seems to say take the dough from the refrigerator, roll out and put in pan, dress and bake right away.  In my experience, baking cold dough is very undesirable for any Chicago style deep-dish or thin pizza and will not give you the superior results that dough warmed up out of the refrigerator (if one uses such) for an hour or two will.  But still it is somewhat interesting and only time and testing will tell. I wonder if there will be a TV show demonstrating this.  Here's the lead off article to the recipe given above.

Chicago-Style Deep-Dish Pizza

Published January 1, 2010.

Deep-dish pizza was born in Chicago, where it boasts a distinctively rich, flaky, biscuitlike crust. The problem? No pizzeria in Chicago would tell us how to make it.

The Problem
Bad deep-dish pizzas are doughy and tasteless, while recipes for the good versions are staunchly protected by the people who make them.

The Goal
We wanted a facsimile of the best of Chicago deep-dish pizzas: a thick crust with an airy, flaky inside, lightly crisp outside, and a rich taste that can hold its own under any kind of topping.

The Solution
The recipes we came across in our research sounded an awful lot like classic pizza dough: Combine flour, cornmeal, salt, sugar, and yeast in a large bowl, then add melted butter and water, transfer the ingredients to a stand mixer, and knead them into a dough. Allow the dough to rise, divide it in half, and let it rise again until doubled in size, then press the dough into a 9-inch round pan on a baking stone in a 500-degree oven.

Our first impression when we followed these steps? Not bad. The butter flavor came through, and the cornmeal added a nice earthiness and crunch, but we wanted a crust with more flake and less chew. It occurred to us to try laminating. This baking term refers to the layering of butter and dough that creates ultra-flaky pastries through a sequence of rolling and folding. After melting part of the butter, we mixed it with the dough, allowed the dough to rise, and rolled it into a rectangle. We spread the remaining butter over the surface and rolled the dough into a cylinder to create layers of buttery dough. To amplify this effect, we then flattened the cylinder into a rectangle, divided it in half, and folded each half into thirds, like a business letter.

There was just one small setback. All that handling caused the temperature of the dough to rise, so by the end of the process, the dough had warmed so much that almost all of the butter had melted, leading to a crust that was more tender and breadlike than flaky. The solution? Moving the dough into the refrigerator for its second rise so that any butter that had melted or gotten overly soft could firm up again. Our only additional tweak was adding oil to each pan to crisp the edges, which worked so well that we didn’t even need to use a pizza stone.

With our crust all set, we considered the pizza’s other components. We favored freshly shredded mozzarella for its smooth texture and the way it formed a consistent barrier between dough and sauce. And we decided to use a thickened version of our Quick Tomato Sauce, which creates surprisingly complex flavor in a mere 15 minutes from canned crushed tomatoes. Spread over the cheese, this bright-tasting sauce won rave reviews from tasters.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2009, 11:17:39 AM by BTB »

Offline FLAVORMAN

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #4 on: December 04, 2009, 01:12:45 PM »
I agree that corn meal is not used in Chicago Deep Dish pizza. I believe one reason for years people have included it in their recipe is that Lou's crust had a yellow color to it. Today not so. I at one time used cold pressed coconut oil that I was told gave their crust flavor and color. Today I cannot find a source for that oil. Many ingredients in their pizza's have changed with new label requirements and health issues with ingredients that were used way back when. I don't know if anyone has also tried coconut oil but it wasn't bad. Today we have our family recipe thanks to  all of your contributions to this web site...

Offline vcb

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #5 on: December 04, 2009, 01:27:27 PM »
Interesting, I've heard of using coconut oil for popcorn, but not in deep dish.

Have you tried corn oil, Flavorman? That adds the right flavor profile for me in my crusts.

I agree that corn meal is not used in Chicago Deep Dish pizza. I believe one reason for years people have included it in their recipe is that Lou's crust had a yellow color to it. Today not so. I at one time used cold pressed coconut oil that I was told gave their crust flavor and color. Today I cannot find a source for that oil. Many ingredients in their pizza's have changed with new label requirements and health issues with ingredients that were used way back when. I don't know if anyone has also tried coconut oil but it wasn't bad. Today we have our family recipe thanks to  all of your contributions to this web site...
-- Ed Heller -aka- VCBurger -- Real Deep Dish - Deep Dish 101
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Offline FLAVORMAN

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #6 on: December 04, 2009, 01:58:03 PM »
A blend of corn and Olive is all we use today...tastes the best .... back then we did use coconut but things have changed..I am talking about early 80's...but I have to give a whole bunch of credit to BTB for the semolina idea..we love it ..but hard to find in south Florida..

Offline DKM

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #7 on: December 04, 2009, 10:45:38 PM »
Cornmeal was added to early cookbook "home" recipes less for color and more for texture.

I still make some of my deep dish pizza's with cornmeal because I like it.
I'm on too many of these boards

Offline BTB

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #8 on: December 05, 2009, 12:19:34 PM »
Regarding the Cook's Illustrated research for this project, I suspect what that involved in large part was searching the internet and returning with a zillion Chicago deep-dish recipes, of which 99% included reference to adding a certain amount of corn meal.  Try it yourself and that's what you'll find.  That's a key indicator of "going down the wrong road," however.  And I think I know the couple of Chicago chefs who during the 70s and 80s wrote extensively about Chicago deep-dish pizza and mistakenly gave guesstimate recipes in newspapers and magazines across the country which served the basis for today's internet "copy-cat" recipes, all of which included cornmeal, and all of which were wrong, wrong and then . . . again . . . wrong. 
 
I don't know why and I know many like cornmeal, but I've eaten many (too many) deep dish pizzas starting from the original Gino's on Rush St. (before Gino's East) and Uno's/Due's, Malnati's, etc. and none ever had cornmeal in their crust formulations.  And I know some people like cornmeal added and I have no problem with that.
 
No one in the know would seriously think that the lamination process reported above is done at any of the great Chicago deep dish pizzerias.  But it may be interesting to try it out none the less.  For home oven cooking, we often have to resort to different methods to arrive at commercial baking results.  (I don't know if that makes any sense.)
 
I have the greatest respect for the American Test Kitchen and the Cooks Country or Illustrated group.  I've learned some incredibly great recipes and techniques for chicken, beef, and pork meals that are absolutely fantastic.  All their pizza recipes to date, however, are the exception and have proven to be . . . well, not so good . . . or off the mark . . . at least on anything resembling great deep-dish or Chicago style pizza.  But their recent attempt here is interesting none-the-less and look forward to hearing any experience with it.

Flavorman, up here in the Tampa Bay area we have a great Italian deli called Mazzaro's (http://www.mazzarosmarket.com/ ) and they have every type of oil imaginable, coconut, sesame, etc.  I will have to try the coconut oil next time I'm there as that sounds very interesting (altho like everything these days, it is pricey).
« Last Edit: December 06, 2009, 11:17:35 AM by BTB »

Offline tikidoc

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #9 on: December 06, 2009, 08:34:01 AM »
Hi, all.  I am new to this website, and relatively new to trying to make deep dish pizza (although not new to consuming them - I grew up in Urbana-Champaign, home of the great Papa Del's).  My homemade pizzas are usually thin crust.

I tried this recipe last night.  The only change I made was to not bake immediately after rolling out the dough - I had another thin crust pizza for the kids in the oven and my timing was a bit off, so the pan pizzas sat for about 45 minutes before baking.  In general, when I make a recipe from Cook's Illustrated, I try to follow it exactly the first time, then make changes the next time around.

Overall, it was a good pizza but, as several have pointed out, the corn meal needs to be left out the next time.  It gave an unpleasant grittiness to the dough.  I did like the laminating idea.  There are nowhere near as many turns (or as much butter) as in a croissant, so it only adds a little flakiness to this dough.  I think that aspect was good, and I will repeat this on my next try.  The sauce was quite good, with a concentrated tomato flavor that I like.  I grated my cheese as instructed and I don't know that it makes any difference as compared to using slices.  Either way, it melts into a cohesive mass of cheese.  I will probably use slices next time because that is easier than grating, and a knife is easier to clean than a box grater.  Plus no risk to my knuckles.

I also need to get a proper dark pan for this before my next attempt.  I used a straight sided 9" cake pan as instructed, which is a bright aluminum (all I had, and good for making cakes that you don't want too brown).  The crust definitely needed to brown more, and I think this will be much better using the appropriate pan.  If anyone has any suggestions as to the best place to purchase an appropriate pan, I would appreciate it.

Sorry, I did not take any pictures.  I do have a couple slices left over, so when I warm them up, I'll take a shot if they still look nice.


Offline BTB

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #10 on: December 06, 2009, 11:54:04 AM »
I'm happy to hear from someone who did try this out.  Welcome to the site, tikidoc.  I think you'll find some useful and fun information here about pizzamaking.  Tell me, when you said your "timing was a bit off, so the pan pizzas sat for about 45 minutes before baking," did you mean it sat for about 45 minutes outside the refrigerator before baking?  I was wondering about the timing of when to start baking after the dough rested in the refrigerator and Cook's Illustrated instructions were not real clear on that point I didn't think.  The usual rule is that refrigerated dough should be allowed to come to room temperature before baking, approx. 45 to 90 minutes is the practice of many of us.  And I do find the results of doing such to be superior to baking the pizza right out of the refrigerator as I don't like the "affect" of baking cold dough.  But in this case, they want to keep the butter from melting into the dough too much.  Sounds like you had a pretty good experience with this recipe.

The 9" and 14" dark Chicago Metallic brand pans are available at all Bed, Bath and Beyond stores and do a very nice job I've found.  I do prefer those from Pizzatools.com, however.  You can order over the internet and get it usually within 7 to 10 days.  Practice using that digital camera as pictures can tell a thousand words as they say and our members here really like to see the commentator's results and what they are talking about.                                   --BTB

Offline tikidoc

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #11 on: December 06, 2009, 12:09:12 PM »
To clarify, I was juggling making thin pizzas for the kids and some other stuff for friends coming over.  I rolled out the dough for the Chicago style as the oven was preheating and got it ready for the oven when the kids declared that they were dying of hunger and had to eat ASAP.  So I threw together a thin pizza (had some "artisan bread in 5 min a day" dough ready to go) for them and baked it before baking the Chicago pizza.  As a result, the Chicago style pizzas sat fully assembled at room temperature before going in the oven.  It was hard to tell with the toppings, but it did appear to rise some before baking.

I will post pictures with my next attempt, the leftovers did not make it past 9 am and I never got pics taken.

I think the laminating technique has some merit, as the flakiness was a good thing.  I am thinking of substituting semolina for the corn meal in my next attempt.

Offline PizzaSecretAgent

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #12 on: December 07, 2009, 12:41:05 AM »
It seems the big secret about pizza crust is the technique for making the crust and not simply the ingredients.

While researching pizza dough recipes, I noticed the experts kept referring to "sheeting" but would only go into detail about
the amount of flour, type of flour, etc. They described sheeting as rolling the dough super thin but left the out the key steps of folding
the dough onto itself while sprinkling layers of flour in between.

The laminating process described in the recent Cook's Illustrated is actually what dough sheeting accomplishes.

I find it interesting that the Cook's recipe is criticized for laminating as a method when in fact "sheeting" with flour in between the sheets
of dough accomplishes the same exact thing. Each layer is not fully incorporated, regardless if the layers are separated by butter (laminating) or flour (sheeting). When placed in the oven, the layers (or sheets) of dough cook at different rates resulting in the flakey and bubbly appearance.


Offline BTB

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #13 on: December 07, 2009, 08:06:25 AM »
I find it interesting that the Cook's recipe is criticized for laminating as a method when in fact "sheeting" with flour in between the sheets of dough accomplishes the same exact thing. Each layer is not fully incorporated, regardless if the layers are separated by butter (laminating) or flour (sheeting). When placed in the oven, the layers (or sheets) of dough cook at different rates resulting in the flakey and bubbly appearance.
Interesting ideas PSA.  Thanks for sharing.  Please come back more often.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #14 on: December 07, 2009, 08:59:53 AM »
As BTB alluded to in an earlier post, I played around with laminated doughs to make different types of pizza crusts. I tried laminations in which I superimposed individual skins on top of each other with butter and/or flour in between the layers and also by folding skins onto themselves and rolling out the dough to form laminations that way. My experiences with a laminated dough in the context of a deep-dish pizza are detailed in Reply 22 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1585.msg14755.html#msg14755. I used a similar approach with skins for a cracker style pizza. When I experimented with Round Table clones, I used the alternative lamination approach in which I rolled out a piece of square dough and used the business letter type of lamination.

What I concluded from my experiments as noted above is that using a lamination approach to form pizza skins is a viable method but can be very labor intensive and maybe too time consuming for most people to implement in a typical home setting using a standard rolling pin. They might try the method once to test out the concept but not use it on a regular basis for all of their doughs where laminations might make sense. I also sense that there will also be some "purists" who will not use such methods for deep-dish doughs simply because none of the deep-dish places in the Chicago area use them. I could be wrong on this, but from my experience and observations on this forum over a period of several years people in general tend to favor the simplest and most convenient methods. However, that shouldn't deter one from forming their own opinions on this matter.

Peter

Offline tikidoc

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #15 on: December 07, 2009, 09:36:26 AM »
The lamination method for the CI recipe is not very time consuming.  It only involves spreading one layer of butter and a few quick folds, so it only added a few minutes to the dough preparation.  Nothing like making croissant dough or puff pastry.  The goal is not to get the paper-thin layers of a French pastry, merely to introduce a few layers to the crust.  I thought the texture (ignoring the annoying addition of the cornmeal) was pretty close to what I have had in Chicago but quite a bit different than the more bread-like crust of Papa Del's in my hometown of Champaign-Urbana.  I think the recipe is a good starting place to tinker with, and I think the lamination process adds a lot.  I am debating if I should substitute semolina for the corn meal in my next attempt, or just make it with all regular flour.

I think Chris Kimball needs to make a trip to Chicago on a pizza sampling mission, then try his magazine's recipe again!

Offline BTB

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #16 on: December 07, 2009, 09:56:21 AM »
I am debating if I should substitute semolina for the corn meal in my next attempt, or just make it with all regular flour.
Suggest over time to try it both ways as there is a split of opinion.  I (and my taste testers) definitely prefer 80% white flour (KAAP) and 20% semolina flour.  And when you get more adventurous, try 80% white flour, 12% semolina, and 8% white rice flour. Then you're heading towards pizza heaven in my estimation.

Here is one I made that tasted as good as any in Chicago.  When in the pan and immediately right before baking, you need to pinch or tightly "crimp" the edges of the pizza to duplicate the results of real Chicago style.  No "fat lips" or large dough rims in real Chicago deep dish pizzas.                                                                                                     --BTB
« Last Edit: December 07, 2009, 10:11:40 AM by BTB »

Offline tikidoc

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #17 on: December 07, 2009, 10:19:33 AM »
Hmmm... I just may have some rice flour.  Maybe I'll try that next time around.  Is that what the pictured pizza is made with?  What does the rice flour add, in your opinion?  I have seen lots of discussions on the merits of semolina but none on rice flour.  Off to do a search...

Offline BTB

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #18 on: December 07, 2009, 10:52:59 AM »
Those particular pictures were with semolina but not rice flour.  But a picture with the little bit of rice flour wouldn't look much different at all.  See my report at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6480.msg83548.html#msg83548 .  I suggest going first with the semolina then later trying with a little added rice flour so you can properly "discern" the distinct little differences.  My taste testers prefer such with a little rice flour, but different tastes are what makes the world go around, right?  --BTB

Offline vcb

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #19 on: December 07, 2009, 10:53:31 AM »
I have no doubt that you've come across dough recipes that mention sheeting, but the thing is..
and other members of this forum can verify, deep dish pizza dough is different from a standard pizza dough.
"Sheeting" or "Laminating" is not part of the process for preparing deep dish dough,
as the dough is not supposed to be overworked or it typically becomes "chewy" or "bready".
That was the point I was trying to make.

It seems the big secret about pizza crust is the technique for making the crust and not simply the ingredients.

While researching pizza dough recipes, I noticed the experts kept referring to "sheeting" but would only go into detail about
the amount of flour, type of flour, etc. They described sheeting as rolling the dough super thin but left the out the key steps of folding
the dough onto itself while sprinkling layers of flour in between.

The laminating process described in the recent Cook's Illustrated is actually what dough sheeting accomplishes.

I find it interesting that the Cook's recipe is criticized for laminating as a method when in fact "sheeting" with flour in between the sheets
of dough accomplishes the same exact thing. Each layer is not fully incorporated, regardless if the layers are separated by butter (laminating) or flour (sheeting). When placed in the oven, the layers (or sheets) of dough cook at different rates resulting in the flakey and bubbly appearance.


-- Ed Heller -aka- VCBurger -- Real Deep Dish - Deep Dish 101
http://www.realdeepdish.com/
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http://virtualcheeseblogger.com/


 

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