Author Topic: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website  (Read 15796 times)

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Offline tikidoc

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #20 on: December 07, 2009, 11:03:50 AM »
I actually found the CI dough to be quite tender.  The laminating process only involved a couple turns so it did not make the dough tough or bready.  Traditional technique, no, but the end product (again, minus the corn meal) was really pretty authentic tasting, if you ignore the grittiness from the corn meal.  The corn meal was a major distraction though.  I am planning to try the recipe with all regular flour, with semolina and with the semolina/rice flour mix.  I'll let y'all know how it goes.
« Last Edit: December 07, 2009, 11:06:06 AM by tikidoc »


Offline PizzaSecretAgent

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #21 on: December 07, 2009, 05:38:53 PM »
I appreciate the responses because Pete-zza's reverse engineering of the laminating process was buried within interesting but detailed
information that most home pizza cooks do not need. For some reason, this particular post doesn't come up on the search.

Pete-zza's butter-in-between the layers is essentially the technique in Cook's Illustrated. I'll let you know
how my pizza turns out. Thanks Pete-zza!

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #22 on: December 08, 2009, 10:17:58 AM »
BTB requested recently via PM that I provide assistance in attempting to convert the CI deep-dish dough recipe to baker's percent format so that the recipe can be scaled up or down to make any number of pizzas using any sizes of deep-dish pans, with either straight sides or sloping sides. BTB also requested that I post my results for the benefit of other members.

There are a couple of ways of doing the conversion but in response to BTB's request I elected to combine the flour and cornmeal (or whatever one might choose to use as a substitute for the cornmeal) and base the rest of the baker's percents on the blend rather than the flour alone. That is the way that BTB has been doing it in other threads and I think it makes sense to stick with that method so as not to confuse anyone. Also, in doing the conversion, I used 8.15 ounces of water per cup rather than 8 ounces, mainly for accuracy (although technically one cup of water weighs 8.345 ounces). I also left out the oil in the conversion process because none of the oil is mixed directly into the dough (one teaspoon is used to oil the bowl and dough and the rest is used to oil the pans). Using the deep-dish dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/dd_calculator.html, I came up with the following, for two pizzas:

Flour Blend* (100%):
Water (53.6184%):
IDY (1.39803%):
Salt (1.55428%):
Butter** (18.4373%):
Sugar (1.48026%):
Total (176.48827%):
538.65 g  |  19 oz | 1.19 lbs
288.82 g  |  10.19 oz | 0.64 lbs
7.53 g | 0.27 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.5 tsp | 0.83 tbsp
8.37 g | 0.3 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.5 tsp | 0.5 tbsp
99.31 g | 3.5 oz | 0.22 lbs | 7 tbsp | 0.44 cups
7.97 g | 0.28 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2 tsp | 0.67 tbsp
950.65 g | 33.53 oz | 2.1 lbs | TF = N/A
* The Flour Blend comprises 16.25 ounces unbleached all-purpose flour and 2.75 ounces cornmeal
** Three tablespoons melted (used in the dough) and four tablespoons softened (used in the lamination process)
Note: For two pizzas: no bowl residue compensation

For a single pizza, the numbers are as follows:

Flour Blend* (100%):
Water (53.6184%):
IDY (1.39803%):
Salt (1.55428%):
Butter** (18.4373%):
Sugar (1.48026%):
Total (176.48827%):
269.33 g  |  9.5 oz | 0.59 lbs
144.41 g  |  5.09 oz | 0.32 lbs
3.77 g | 0.13 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.25 tsp | 0.42 tbsp
4.19 g | 0.15 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.75 tsp | 0.25 tbsp
49.66 g | 1.75 oz | 0.11 lbs | 10.5 tsp | 3.5 tbsp
3.99 g | 0.14 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1 tsp | 0.33 tbsp
475.33 g | 16.77 oz | 1.05 lbs | TF = N/A
* The Flour Blend comprises 8.13 ounces unbleached all-purpose flour and 1.38 ounces cornmeal
** One and a half tablespoons melted (used in the dough) and two tablespoons softened (used in the lamination process)
Note: For one pizza; no bowl residue compensation

The instructions for the recipe say to use a 9" cake pan (which I take to be straight-sided) and, after forming a dough piece into a 13" disk with a 1/4" thickness, pressing the disk into the pan up to 1" depth. Based on these instructions, I entered different values of thickness factors into the deep-dish dough calculating tool until I got a total dough piece weight of 16.77 ounces. Doing this, I came up with a thickness factor of 0.1977. All of the numbers lined up, so I feel confident that the thickness factor number is correct. It may not be exactly right because I used a bit more water and some oil from the bowl may end up in the dough, but the differences should be minimal. I also did not include any bowl residue compensation, which one may want to do to compensate for minor dough losses during the preparation of the dough. BTB has previously used 1.5% bowl residue compensation. I would say that that is a reasonable number to use for a stand mixer application.

As an example of a different pan size, such as a 12" straight-sided pan with a dough depth of 1", the numbers would look like this:

Flour Blend (100%):
Water (53.6184%):
IDY (1.39803%):
Salt (1.55428%):
Butter (18.4373%):
Sugar (1.48026%):
Total (176.48827%):
448.96 g  |  15.84 oz | 0.99 lbs
240.72 g  |  8.49 oz | 0.53 lbs
6.28 g | 0.22 oz | 0.01 lbs | 2.08 tsp | 0.69 tbsp
6.98 g | 0.25 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.25 tsp | 0.42 tbsp
82.78 g | 2.92 oz | 0.18 lbs | 5.83 tbsp | 0.36 cups
6.65 g | 0.23 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.67 tsp | 0.56 tbsp
792.36 g | 27.95 oz | 1.75 lbs | TF = 0.1977
Note: No bowl residue compensation

Of course, one would have to allocate the Flour Blend between its two components and do the proper allocation of the butter in the same manner as noted above. I will further note that the percent of cornmeal in all of the above examples is 14.47% of the total Flour Blend. I see no reason why one might not replace the cornmeal with an equal weight of all-purpose flour or semolina flour. However, if semolina flour is used, and although it has a tendency to hydrate similarly to other flours, it may be necessary, based on my experience working with semolina flours, to slightly increase the hydration of the total dough formula, or simply tweak the amount of water in the mixer bowl.

Peter

Offline tikidoc

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #23 on: December 08, 2009, 09:03:05 PM »
So version #2 was an improvement.  I did the CI recipe except substituted semolina for the corn meal (by weight).  I thought the crust was a little better.  No annoying grittiness but it was a little bit less flaky.  Overall, I liked it a bit better.  The only other change I made was the pan.  I used a dark nonstick spring form pan.  The dark surface improved browning but the two piece pan leaked out some of the oil in the bottom of the pan, creating a lot of smoke.  My range hood is pretty good so it was not a terribly big deal, but I need to get some real deep dish pans...


Offline mrmojo1

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #24 on: December 08, 2009, 10:31:31 PM »
Nice lookin pies!!!  they had to be a big hit!! good job!!

Offline vcb

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #25 on: December 08, 2009, 11:53:07 PM »
but I need to get some real deep dish pans...


Amazon has the AMCO pans that I use pretty cheap (though it looks like they're out of stock right now):

http://www.amazon.com/Amco-Food-Service-14-Inch-Round/dp/B00188CAC4/ref=sr_1_19?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1260333666&sr=8-19

I own one 14" and two 12" pans. They're great!
I've never had a problem using them without blacking the outside of the pans.
I just make sure I've oiled the bottom of the pan well.
The pans are slowly getting darker on their own.

If you're shopping for a similar pan, look for aluminized steel cake pans. Steel carries the heat better than straight aluminum.

Another supplier I found:
14"
http://www.katom.com/268-901425.html

12"
http://www.katom.com/268-901225.html

9"
http://www.katom.com/268-909025.html
« Last Edit: December 09, 2009, 12:02:24 AM by vcb »
-- Ed Heller -aka- VCBurger -- Real Deep Dish - Deep Dish 101
http://www.realdeepdish.com/
http://facebook.com/realdeepdish/
http://virtualcheeseblogger.com/

Offline BTB

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #26 on: December 09, 2009, 07:17:45 PM »
Hey Jess, I'm following with keen interest your experiments and trials with this recipe.  My spring-form pans BTW are collecting dust and I don't know if I should sell them at a garage sale or what, altho many here love using them.  Suggest coating lightly with shortening instead of oil if you use them again.

One reservation that I had with this recipe was the low level or rather lack of oil in it.  Chicago style deep dish pizza has ALOT of oil in their formulations, generally . . . upwards of 25%, altho I've been reluctant to go that high.  This has no oil incorporated in it at all, altho there is somewhere near 6 to 7% of melted butter mixed directly with the ingredients.  The remainder of the softened butter is used for lamination purposes and I don't know if that counts for or is the same as having it "incorporated" into the dough formulation.  What do you think adding 4 to 6% of oil (olive, vegetable, corn, canola or combination) would do for it?  (i.e. in addition to the suggested level of butter.)

Pictures looked great in any event.                           --BTB

Offline tikidoc

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #27 on: December 10, 2009, 06:04:00 AM »
25%?  Wow!  Yea, I could add some more oil (not 25% though!) to the dough next time.  I think a blend of olive and a flavorless oil might work well.

I will certainly not be adding as much to the pan next time, unless I get a solid pan.  What I liked about the springform pan was the ease of removal, and the fact that it was fairly cheap, but I think you need the extra oil in the pan to get the crust right, and 90% of it leaks out with this pan.

I might give the cast iron pan a try next time.  I have a pretty nice collection of well-seasoned cast iron pans in various sizes, so I may try those before I invest in more pans.  I am running out of places to store things in my kitchen!

I would like to add that we had leftovers last night, and the pizza was better the second time around.  We have a little convection oven that has a wire pan to hold the food, and used it to reheat the pizza.  I think the time in the convection oven improved the crust's texture even more.
« Last Edit: December 10, 2009, 06:13:09 AM by tikidoc »

Offline tikidoc

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #28 on: December 20, 2009, 07:45:20 PM »
OK, did the 12% semolina 8% rice version today.  The best yet.  I used a total of 19 ounces of flours for two 9" pies, with 15.2 oz AP, 2.3 oz semolina, and 1.5 oz rice flour.  The rest was per the CI recipe, but I ran out of butter and was 1 TB short on the laminating step.  I will post pics later, but the crust was tender and flaky, and had a better texture than previous versions. 

Of note, the only flour in the house was the Eagle Mills Ultragrain blend stuff discussed in http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6290.0.html and it worked well.  I was supposed to pick up a bag of KASL flour yesterday but we have been snowed in all weekend, so that was all I had.  I did not detect any whole wheat flavor and neither did my very picky husband who is not a fan of whole wheat.

Offline tikidoc

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #29 on: December 22, 2009, 08:29:17 PM »
Pics of the most recent effort.  Fillings - sausage, spinach and mushrooms.  The mozzarella is home-made with raw milk from our cow.



Offline BTB

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #30 on: December 20, 2010, 05:35:02 PM »
About a year ago I came across the deep dish pizza recipe recited first above from Cook's Illustrated, a publication of the American Test Kitchen (ATK).  And I have a lot of respect for that organization, but I've never found their pizza recipes to be that exciting or good, but that's just in my personal humble opinion.  While that's just how I feel regarding their pizza recipes (and I didn't find the recipe first reported above to be that great, esp. with corn meal added), I have found their other cooking recipes, techniques, advice, etc. to be generally excellent, so I have a lot of regard for much of their work.  So when I see something in their publications, TV or on the internet, I pay special attention to it. 
 
Well, I came across the 2010 Cook's Illustrated edition of "Italian Favorites" on the magazine stand recently and noticed a new recipe in an article entitled "Bringing Deep-Dish Pizza Home" and it piqued my interest.  They don't represent it to be like anything at any famous pizzeria or any given geographic area that may be well known for deep-dish pizza and just put it out "for what it's worth," I guess.  I have to again question their methodology as here's how they expressed it in the article:

"After scouring various cookbooks, my colleagues and I in the test kitchen made five different pizza dough's and baked them in deep-dish pans. To our disappointment, none delivered the flavorful, crisp brown crust that we felt was needed.  Even pizza dough recipes developed exclusively for deep-dish pizzas were terrible." 
I'm not sure about that last sentence but they must have been referring to the many erroneous corn meal crust recipes that flood the internet.  And they must not have paid any attention to this website and it's many, many great deep-dish pizza crust recipes.  Go figure.
 
But anyway, after they "scoured" the "various cookbooks," what did they settle on?  A recipe that includes a boiled, drained, and a cooled potato that is put thru a potato ricer and added to the formulation.  Now my first reaction to this was not positive and as a matter of fact, I have not yet tried this recipe out.  But I am a little skeptical as I haven't previously experienced any good pizza recipe from the highly respected ATK yet and my skepticism continues.  Where did they get this from?  What well known pizzerias serve pizzas made with potatoes?  Where on this planet does this potato style deep dish exist?  Or was this just a product of an off the cuff experiment.  I know a lot of artisan and specialty breads are made in part with potatoes (and some very good), but frankly haven't heard of any deep-dish pizzerias with it.  Hopefully many out there reading this will report on many that I and others had not been previously aware of.  Because I have to reserve judgment on the benefit of this until I learn more, I realize.
 
The recipe given in the article is for making one 14-inch deep dish pizza and is as follows:
 
1 medium baking potato (about 9 ounces) peeled and quartered
1 & 1/2 tsp rapid-rise yeast
3 & 1/2 cups (17-1/2 ounces) unbleached AP flour
1 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees)
6 Tbs extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for oiling bowl*
1 & 3/4 tsps table salt
    *Only 2 Tbs of the 6 are added into the ingredients, however

I do wish they would use baker's percentages and weights as it would be nice to make a smaller size than this large pizza without wasting time and ingredients.  While there's a lot of weights given here, I'm not good at converting it into other size pizzas without the weights and percentages.  That's the big advantage of the dough calculation tools on this website and its methodology.
 
If anyone is interested in trying this out, please share your experience or otherwise comment here.
 
                                                                                   --BTB
« Last Edit: December 21, 2010, 08:07:39 AM by BTB »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #31 on: December 20, 2010, 07:11:37 PM »
BTB,

The use of potatoes for deep-dish doughs has come up on several occasions on the forum. For example, see the following:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6111.msg52457.html#msg52457 and related thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,2014.msg17762.html#msg17762

Reply 4 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1549.msg14102.html#msg14102 (re potato flour)

Reply 100 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,524.msg16071/topicseen.html#msg16071

Reply 4 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1483.msg15851.html#msg15851

It shouldn't be all that difficult to convert the CI recipe you posted to baker's percent format but the problem is that none of the dough calculating tools have potato in any form among the ingredients listed in the tools. If you were to make a smaller size deep-dish pizza, what would that size be?

Peter



Offline BTB

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #32 on: December 20, 2010, 07:35:05 PM »
Interesting.  So it's been discussed before.  Can one see a boiled potato providing a "crisp brown crust," which was one of their stated goals at the onset?  I would like to just experiment doing this with just one of my small 6" diameter pizzatool deep dish pans.

                                                                                      --BTB

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #33 on: December 20, 2010, 08:15:31 PM »
BTB,

Does the CI recipe state 1) whether the 14" deep-dish pan is straight-sided or tapered, 2) the depth of the 14" deep-dish pan, and 3) how far up the sides of the pan the dough is pushed? Also, how deep is your 6" deep-dish pan and is it straight-sided or tapered? If tapered, what are the top and bottom diameters?

Peter
« Last Edit: December 20, 2010, 08:36:14 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline BTB

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #34 on: December 21, 2010, 08:11:48 AM »
Peter,

They don't say whether it's a straight-sided 14 inch deep dish pan or a tapered one and the pictures appear either straight-sided or slight taper.  My 6" pan is essentially straight-sided being 5.875" at the bottom and 6" at the top with a depth of 2.25".  Their instructions indicate to "pull up into edges and up sides of pan to form 1-inch-high lip."  I most often go up 1.5" up the side. 

Looking at the article again leaves me a little confused on the amount of olive oil to add into the formulation.  The recipe printed in the article was as I recited above, but the step by step explanation only recites the addition into the ingredient mix of 2 Tbs of olive oil and later recites to use the remaining 4 Tbs to line the bottom of the 14" deep dish pan.  So there isn't much oil in this formulation and the recipe above should probably be changed to recite 2 Tbs instead.  I modified the posting and so noted that with a footnote in Reply #30 above.

                                                                                    --BTB

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #35 on: December 21, 2010, 08:27:12 AM »
BTB,

I think I might be able to scale down the CI recipe you posted using the deep-dish dough calculating tool, with a couple of tricks, but it would help to know what the "lip" means. Is that the same as the height of the dough in the pan at the sides or is it something more than that? For now, I will a assume that the 14" pan is straight-sided since that seems to be the traditional design. Is there anything in the CI article that says how deep the 14" pan is?

BTW, the ingredients listed in the deep-dish dough calculating tool includes potato flour. I'm sure we added that ingredient based on what Tom Lehmann and possibly others wrote on its use in deep-dish doughs.

Peter

Offline BTB

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #36 on: December 21, 2010, 09:31:42 AM »
From the pictures, the lip appears to be a partially pinched or crimped raised rim of the pizza, although not as tightly or thinly pinched or crimped as I normally do it.  It is definitely not the same height as the rest of the dough in the pan, but considerably higher.

While there is nothing in the CI article that says anything about the depth of the deep dish pan, the illustration of putting the dough in the pan and forming the "standing edge" (as they put it) would seem to suggest or rather shows that there was a further inch above the 1-inch raised dough skin rim, meaning to me that the pan is a 2" deep one.

I'm wondering if potato flour has the same effect as the actual baking potato.  They could have easily found and used potato flour, but didn't.  And a side note in the article recites:

"Potatoes in Bread?  You Bet.
Boiled potatoes in this pizza dough had a distinct effect on the flavor and texture of the final crust.  The result:  a moister, more tender, sweeter, and softer dough than one made with just wheat flour.  I wanted to know why the boiled potatoes made such a difference in the pizza dough.  According to Dr. Al Bushway, professor of food science at the University of Maine, potatoes contain more starch than wheat flour.  Since starch traps moisture during baking, this made for a moister dough.  Potatoes also contain less protein than flour.  This results in less gluten being formed in the dough, which in turn produces a softer, more tender product.  Finally, potatoes add another dimension of flavor in two ways.  For one, the free sugars in the potatoes cause faster fermentation, resulting in a more complex flavor in a shorter period of time.  Second, the sugars that are not consumed by the yeast in the fermentation process add sweetness to the final dough."


So one must wonder why they didn't use potato flour if the difference wasn't that significant.  The AP flour in their recipe weighed 17.5 ounces and the boiled potato that was added to it weighed "about 9 ounces" as recited in the article.

They do recommend placing the deep dish pizza pan with the dough skin only on a low oven rack lined with baking tiles, stone or rimless cookie sheet at 425 degrees F and par bake it for about 15 minutes, then dressed with cheese, sauce and topping and returned to the oven at the same temperature for another 10 to 15 minutes, then raising to the top oven rack for 5 minutes to achieve a more golden brown coloring.

                                                                                                               --BTB

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #37 on: December 21, 2010, 03:24:10 PM »
BTB

Without quite having a full grasp mentally of how the lip is formed and sized in relation to the rest of the dough that is pushed up the sides of the CI 14" pan, I decided nonetheless to take a stab at converting the CI deep-dish dough recipe you posted and to use the deep-dish dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/dd_calculator.html to come up with a thickness factor for the dough made using that recipe. I will tell you how I did all this in case you want to repeat what I did but possibly using better data. For purposes of what I did, I assumed that the 14" CI deep-dish pan is straight-sided with a depth of 2". Here is what I did:

1. I converted the volume measurements in the CI recipe to weights, and used the weights of all of the ingredients to come up with a baker's percent version. For the water, I assumed one cup is 8.15 ounces by weight. That is about what I get when I weigh a cup of water in my one-cup Pyrex glass measuring cup. The total weight of all of the ingredients came to 36.11 ounces, or 1023.61 grams.

2. I selected the Thickness Factor option of the deep-dish dough calculating tool, for purposes to be discussed below.

3. I entered the baker's percents for all the ingredients in the CI recipe. As a proxy for the baked potato, I used the box called Potato Flour. That will give the correct weight but the conversion to volumes will not be correct and can be ignored (as noted below).

4. I entered 14" as the size of the deep-dish pan. As noted above, I assumed that the pan is straight-sided, and noted such in the deep-dish dough calculating tool

5. I treated the "lip" of the dough in relation to the rest of the dough pressed up the sides of the 14" pan as being tantamount to pushing the dough up the entire depth of the pan (2") but without a lip. This is where you might develop better data for purposes of using the deep-dish dough calculating tool to get a more accurate set of data.

6. As the final step, I kept putting numbers in the Thickness Factor box until the final dough weight registered 36.11 ounces and its metric value of 1023.61 grams. The value of thickness factor that yielded those results was 0.156366. The overall dough formulation, with some rewording of the ingredients, and deleting the volume conversions for the baked potato, was as follows:

Unbleached All-Purpose Flour (100%):
Water (46.5714%):
IDY--Rapid-Rise (0.91071%):
Salt (1.96875%):
Extra Virgin Olive Oil (5.44318%):
Baked Potato (medium) (51.4286%):
Total (206.32264%):
496.12 g  |  17.5 oz | 1.09 lbs
231.05 g  |  8.15 oz | 0.51 lbs
4.52 g | 0.16 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.5 tsp | 0.5 tbsp
9.77 g | 0.34 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.75 tsp | 0.58 tbsp
27 g | 0.95 oz | 0.06 lbs | 6 tsp | 2 tbsp
255.15 g | 9 oz | 0.56 lbs
1023.61 g | 36.11 oz | 2.26 lbs | TF = 0.156366

Of course, there is no need for you to try to completely replicate the shaping of the dough in the pan to get a lip. For example, if you want to use your 6" deep-dish pan with the diameter measurements you posted (5.875"/6"), and you want to push the dough up the sides of the pan by 1.5", then, entering the required inputs to the deep-dish dough calculating tool yields the following dough formulation:

Unbleached All-Purpose Flour (100%):
Water (46.5714%):
IDY--Rapid-Rise (0.91071%):
Salt (1.96875%):
Extra Virgin Olive Oil (5.44318%):
Baked Potato (51.4286%):
Total (206.32264%):
108.17 g  |  3.82 oz | 0.24 lbs
50.37 g  |  1.78 oz | 0.11 lbs
0.99 g | 0.03 oz | 0 lbs | 0.33 tsp | 0.11 tbsp
2.13 g | 0.08 oz | 0 lbs | 0.38 tsp | 0.13 tbsp
5.89 g | 0.21 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.31 tsp | 0.44 tbsp
55.63 g | 1.96 oz | 0.12 lbs
223.17 g | 7.87 oz | 0.49 lbs | TF = 0.156366
Note: Dough is for use in a deep-dish pan with a top diameter of 6" and a bottom diameter of 5.875", with the dough pushed up the sides of the pan by 1.5"

For your information, according to the data at the SelfNutritionData website at http://nutritiondata.self.com/, a baked potato, flesh only (i.e, no skin) and no salt, is about 75.4% water. How that plays out in the dough remains to be seen. You will also note that I did not try to account for the oil that is put in the pan itself. No doubt, some of that oil will end up in the dough. I just don't know how much.

Peter




Offline BTB

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #38 on: December 28, 2010, 09:14:14 AM »
Peter, thanks for all the help and effort in developing the CI potato deep dish formulation. 
 
I made two small deep dish pizzas yesterday, one to try out the CI recipe with the use of some potato and another more traditional kind (at least to me) with which to compare it to.  The formulation for the CI potato recipe was the one that Peter last gave above, only I used ADY instead of IDY (a little shy of 1/2 tsp).
 
Unbleached All-Purpose Flour (100%)
Water (46.5714%)
IDY--Rapid-Rise (0.91071%)
Salt (1.96875%)
Extra Virgin Olive Oil (5.44318%)
Baked Potato (51.4286%)
 
I followed CI article's procedure fairly faithfully, save for the semi-autolyse technique, and boiled the potato for about 15 to 16 minutes, ran it through the ricer, and it afterwards incorporated nicely with all the rest of the ingredients.  It rose nicely after an hour in a slightly warmed oven, then after reforming the ball and letting it rise a couple of more times on the counter (and after about 6 hours), I par-baked the crust at around 440 degrees F in an oiled pan for about 10 minutes.  Prior to the par bake the dough was a little tacky and it was very difficult forming a lip on the skin, even after letting the dough rest for a while.  I even tried to crimp it a little harder onto the side of the pan but it wouldn't stay up very well.
 
After dressing the pizza, I baked it for about 18 to 20 minutes on the very bottom rack of my electric oven (with no visible heating elements).  I took it out near the end of the bake and used a small frosting spatula to check and pick up the pizza to view the bottom of it to ensure that it wasn't burning, which it wasn't but instead was nicely browning.
 
I didn't take many pictures, but here is the CI potato deep dish in the pan after pulling it from the oven.
One thing you won't see is any lip/rim on the pizza, which was dfficult to form.
« Last Edit: December 31, 2010, 10:14:05 AM by BTB »

Offline BTB

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Re: New Chicago Deep-Dish Recipe on Website
« Reply #39 on: December 28, 2010, 09:16:07 AM »
The second small pizza that I did was just a variation of one that I made and reported on at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6480.msg116667.html#msg116667 . I again tried the version with the King Arthur Extra Fancy Durum Flour, only I increased the proportion of the durum to 50% instead of 35%.  After lightly mixing all the ingredients, I similarly let it rise in the slightly warmed oven for about an hour, reformed the ball and let it similarly rise on the counter for a number of hours before baking.  I didn't par bake the dough skin like one is instructed to do with the CI potato recipe and after placing the "durum" skin in the oiled pan, crimping the rim of the skin up the side of the pan (which was easy to do),  and dressing the pie, it similarly baked at about 440 degrees F for around 18 to 20 minutes.  The recipe that I used was as follows:
 
Flour Blend* (100%) 
Water (45%)
ADY (.6%) 
Salt (1%) 
Olive Oil (6%) 
Corn Oil (12%) 
Butter/Margarine (6%)   
Sugar (1.5%)                     
*The flour blend consisted of  50% KAAP and 50% KA Extra Fancy Durum
 
I similarly checked the bottom of the pizza near the end of the bake cycle with the small spatula to ensure that the bottom of the crust wasn't getting too browned.  It wasn't and after a few more minutes of baking, I pulled the pizza from the oven.  Nice, crispy and golden brown.  A photo of that pizza after pulling it out of the oven follows. It's probably just a personal thing, but me and my taste testers really love the thin, crimped and crispy pizza rim or edge and with this recipe was super easy to achieve.
« Last Edit: December 31, 2010, 10:17:25 AM by BTB »