Author Topic: Reverse Engineering DiFara's Pizzas  (Read 82007 times)

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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Reverse Engineering DiFara's Pizzas
« Reply #300 on: December 19, 2014, 03:29:06 PM »
The cut tomatoes taste fresher and brighter than the rest of sauce.  A nice contrast.
There is an underlying meaty smokiness and slighlty fatty taste to the sauce, I identify it as pork.  I'm fairly certain the sauce is cooked with a small block of pancetta and removed after.  This is what my former boss used to do as well back in the 80's. 

I would think a ham hock is more likely.
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Offline Arctic Pizza

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Re: Reverse Engineering DiFara's Pizzas
« Reply #301 on: December 19, 2014, 04:03:16 PM »
I would think a ham hock is more likely.

Makes sense, a roasted ham hock would probably be better on a commercial scale.  Dom Demarco is from Caserta, which is in Campania.  They cook pork in almost everything.







Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Reverse Engineering DiFara's Pizzas
« Reply #302 on: December 19, 2014, 04:07:18 PM »
They cook pork in almost everything.

Hard to find much fault in that  ;D
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Offline Arctic Pizza

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Re: Reverse Engineering DiFara's Pizzas
« Reply #303 on: December 21, 2014, 11:46:31 PM »
Hard to find much fault in that  ;D

The 20 year minimalist trend is ending in pizza world.  Welcome back animal trans fats, indulgence and all things "bad" for you


Offline Obsauced

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Re: Reverse Engineering DiFara's Pizzas
« Reply #304 on: December 27, 2014, 12:57:30 AM »
There could very well be a blend, but I would guess it's mostly Caputo 00, or an equivalent 00 flour with maybe some hi-gluten cut in but I'd say it's 25% or less.  Also, contrary to popular belief, Caputo 00 is not a low gluten flour, it is equivalent of KABF at 12.5% protein, so it stands somewhere in the middle.  I have had Di Fara enough times in the past 10 years and twice in past week to discern a texture difference in their pies vs the vast majority of NY street pizza made with hi-gluten flour boosted with potassium bromate additive.  Unfortunately, this can't be explained or described in pictures, but by words or you'll have to just try it yourself.   Ive observed that most people on the board don't actually talk about the other senses, like taste, the bite, the texture in the mouth, and are focusing more on visual aspects.  The one obvious difference in the Di Fara crust compared to 99% of NY street pizza places is that it is not chewy and heavy.  The crust is crispy, thin but not too thin, and much lighter than most NY pizza.  If had to define on what side of the flour spectrum that Di Fara pies are at, I'd say they are more akin to what you'd expect when using an AP flour.

I did sit down interview with maggie about three years ago and they use a blend of a 00 flour and all trumps if that helps with the clone. There's nothing like Di faras in the world and it's nearly impossible to replicate it
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Offline rparker

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Re: Reverse Engineering DiFara's Pizzas
« Reply #305 on: January 21, 2015, 11:02:32 PM »
On the matter of pork, I've known two people from the Penn-NJ-NYC area to use a Boston Butt as a base meat for a meat-sauce. About the only thing I recall is that the roast was browned in the pan before other ingredients got added. This would obviously be something not for pizza, especially NY-style as I like it, but something I thought may have some relevance.

I do wonder something, though. Is there any chance that the pork-fat element in the sauce help to keep the dough and sauce elements from combining too much? Perhaps act as some sort of shield?
Maybe they should just make white T-shirts with pizza juice stains already on them.