Author Topic: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.  (Read 47000 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Matthew

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 2250
Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #250 on: January 05, 2011, 05:20:37 PM »
Norma,
Beautiful crumb!  My next pizza in teglia will be a starter dough.  If you have it, add some semola (15-20%) & a bit of malt syrup to your next mix.

Matt
« Last Edit: January 05, 2011, 05:23:33 PM by Matthew »


Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23692
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #251 on: January 05, 2011, 08:27:03 PM »
Norma,
Beautiful crumb!  My next pizza in teglia will be a starter dough.  If you have it, add some semola (15-20%) & a bit of malt syrup to your next mix.

Matt

Matt,

Thanks for you kind words about the crumb.  :)  Good to hear your next attempt will include a starter.  I only have that kind of semola on hand that I tried about a year ago and donít have any malt syrup right now to try out.  I can understand both choices would be good to try out.  What are your opinions about the percent of oil to add?  That still has me wondering for my next attempt.

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline Jose L. Piedra

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 364
  • Location: Montreal, QC
  • Ebeddu e cavuru, e beddu davveru!
Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #252 on: January 05, 2011, 09:28:13 PM »
Re: lightness: Judging by the pics, those slices appear to be pushing the limit of just how light a pizza crumb can get, and I can think of no reason why Pizzarium's pies would be much lighter (if at all) or even could be. Norma, your most recent effort is nothing short of astonishing, and I hope you find the results to be reproducible. With respect to the latter point, I have one more question: how did you go about shaping the finished dough and fitting it to the pan?

JLP
Scarsu d'ogghiu, e riccu di provolazzu ::)

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23692
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #253 on: January 05, 2011, 09:48:51 PM »
Re: lightness: Judging by the pics, those slices appear to be pushing the limit of just how light a pizza crumb can get, and I can think of no reason why Pizzarium's pies would be much lighter (if at all) or even could be. Norma, your most recent effort is nothing short of astonishing, and I hope you find the results to be reproducible. With respect to the latter point, I have one more question: how did you go about shaping the finished dough and fitting it to the pan?

JLP

Jose,

Thanks for your kind words.

Judging by pictures isnít always accurate.  Although my attempt last week at market, didnít have the same crumb look, that pizza actually was lighter.  That is what makes me wonder if I need to go up in the oil percent.  In my opinion the starter also helped to get a more irregular crumb, but I could be wrong.  I still am deciding what to try next.  When I look at bread making techiniques with a longer ferment time and using a starter in combination with higher hydrations, there is usually an irregular crumb structure, but in bread making they donít usually use the higher amounts of oil.  That is what has me stumped.

This dough was sticky in the beginning, as can be seen on the pictures, but with each stretch and fold, the dough became less sticky.  On the last stretch and fold at home, I did use flour on my home table to finally form the dough, but did give another stretch and fold at market with flour also.  I didnít use a lot of flour, but enough to make sure the dough came together well.  With the final two stretch and folds, I could see more air pockets forming in the dough.  This dough was very soft when opening it.  I opened this dough just like I would any other pizza.  It almost fell open by itself.  That is why the dough in the pan wasnít even.  I am not used to opening a dough that was this easy.

I will make another attempt next week, to see if I can reproduce some of the same results.  I am not to sure if I can or how I will go about it, at this time. I am going to use the milk kefir starter though and probably kept it at 20%.

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline Matthew

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 2250
Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #254 on: January 06, 2011, 05:58:17 AM »
Matt,

Thanks for you kind words about the crumb.  :)  Good to hear your next attempt will include a starter.  I only have that kind of semola on hand that I tried about a year ago and donít have any malt syrup right now to try out.  I can understand both choices would be good to try out.  What are your opinions about the percent of oil to add?  That still has me wondering for my next attempt.

Norma

Hi Norma,
In my last exchange with Massimo from Bosco pizzeria he recommended using 25 grams for every liter of water which is about what I've been using.  He also confirmed that he does not use a starter & that his dough undergoes a minimum of 48 hours under cold refrigeration.  He also told me that the flour that he uses is the pizza in teglia mix from Molino sul Clitunno.

Matt

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23692
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #255 on: January 06, 2011, 08:34:22 AM »
Hi Norma,
In my last exchange with Massimo from Bosco pizzeria he recommended using 25 grams for every liter of water which is about what I've been using.  He also confirmed that he does not use a starter & that his dough undergoes a minimum of 48 hours under cold refrigeration.  He also told me that the flour that he uses is the pizza in teglia mix from Molino sul Clitunno.

Matt

Matt,

I watched all the videos from Pizzeria Boscos and saw how sticky his fermenting dough looked and how all the fermenting bubbles were in his doughs.  I also watched how he handled his doughs.  I saw he bakes his pizza in teglia in some kind of metal pans.  I donít know if they are steel or not. 

Since you have had exchanges from him and he told you his dough undergoes a minimum of 48 hours of cold refrigeration, I can understand how his pizza in teglia comes out with so many irregular holes in the crumb.

I have been trying to study about making a high hydration focaccia dough.  I know most places that I have been reading about say focaccia does add high amounts of oil.  In some of the articles it said to mix the oil upfront with some of the flour and mix until some gluten is formed and then add the flour later and give the dough stretch and folds to develop the gluten more. 

I wonder how Campo de Fior makes about the same kind of pizza in teglia and then they just bake on the deck.  I can see in the last two experiments I did at market that both methods might work.  I also wonder if Campo de Fior or Pizzarium does use a starter.  PizzeriaBosco, Campo de Fior, and Pizzarium pizza in teglia all look quite similiar.

If I have time I would like to try some of the methods I read about, and try to bake in my home oven.  I donít know if I will have time before I attempt this kind of pizza at market again.

I wonder what kind of flour would be the closest to Molino sul Clitunno.

Thanks for your insight.  :)

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline dellavecchia

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2631
Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #256 on: January 06, 2011, 08:49:04 AM »

I wonder what kind of flour would be the closest to Molino sul Clitunno.


I looked on the website to see if I could find the characteristics of their pizza in teglia mix, but to no avail. They do, however, have a recipe posted using the mix which is quite similar to what Bosco is using.

John

Offline Matthew

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 2250
Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #257 on: January 06, 2011, 08:55:19 AM »
Matt,

I watched all the videos from Pizzeria Boscos and saw how sticky his fermenting dough looked and how all the fermenting bubbles were in his doughs.  I also watched how he handled his doughs.  I saw he bakes his pizza in teglia in some kind of metal pans.  I donít know if they are steel or not. 

Since you have had exchanges from him and he told you his dough undergoes a minimum of 48 hours of cold refrigeration, I can understand how his pizza in teglia comes out with so many irregular holes in the crumb.

I have been trying to study about making a high hydration focaccia dough.  I know most places that I have been reading about say focaccia does add high amounts of oil.  In some of the articles it said to mix the oil upfront with some of the flour and mix until some gluten is formed and then add the flour later and give the dough stretch and folds to develop the gluten more. 

I wonder how Campo de Fior makes about the same kind of pizza in teglia and then they just bake on the deck.  I can see in the last two experiments I did at market that both methods might work.  I also wonder if Campo de Fior or Pizzarium does use a starter.  PizzeriaBosco, Campo de Fior, and Pizzarium pizza in teglia all look quite similar.

If I have time I would like to try some of the methods I read about, and try to bake in my home oven.  I donít know if I will have time before I attempt this kind of pizza at market again.

I wonder what kind of flour would be the closest to Molino sul Clitunno.

Thanks for your insight.  :)

Norma

There are many variations on focaccia.  To my knowledge focaccia alla genovese uses the highest amount of oil.  The pizza at Campo de Fior is technically pizza stirata romana.  I am not sure of their process but it's traditionally an indirect dough using a biga.  This dough has similar characteristics as pizza romana in teglia & is interchangeable.  The fundamental difference is the way it's baked on a stone instead of in a pan.  
As far a starters go; Gabriele uses a mother dough given to him by a bakery in Italy that is said to date back to WW1.

Hope this helps,
Matt

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23692
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #258 on: January 06, 2011, 09:08:07 AM »
There are many variations on focaccia.  To my knowledge focaccia alla genovese uses the highest amount of oil.  The pizza at Campo de Fior is technically pizza stirata romana.  I am not sure of their process but it's traditionally an indirect dough using a biga.  This dough has similar characteristics as pizza romana in teglia & is interchangeable.  The fundamental difference is the way it's baked on a stone instead of in a pan.  
As far a starters go; Gabriele uses a mother dough given to him by a bakery in Italy that is said to date back to WW1.

Hope this helps,
Matt

Matt,

Yes, your post was a help!  :) The way these three different pizzerias or bakeries go about making something similar is what gets me all mixed up. Since I never will be able to actually taste any of their pies, I will never be sure if I can make anything really like theirs.

I have read about other people tasting pizza at all three places and from what they describe, all three sound very similar.  I believe they are all high hydration doughs.  At least in my opinion, it looks like they are.

Thanks for your help.

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!


Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23692
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #259 on: January 06, 2011, 12:13:12 PM »
I started another attempt this morning with starting to make a poolish with the milk kefir.  This milk kefir is over 4 weeks old.  I have kept it in the refrigerator for 4 weeks to see what would happen with it, and if it was still good.  I did taste some of the over 4 week old milk kefir and so far it hasnít seemed to do anything bad to me.  :-D  The taste of the milk kefir doesnít seem to change, no matter how long it is left in the refrigerator.  I still donít understand milk kefir, but it is interesting to me.  The first picture is of milk kefir grains I drained and fed last evening.  The second picture is of the over 4 week old milk kefir, this morning. The last picture is of the milk kefir poolish for my next attempt at home, mixed with KASL.  I am going to try and use my 12" deep-dish pan and bake on the stone when the dough seems ready.  I kept all the percents the same as my last attempt, but decreased the oil a little. From my other attempt at market, when I used no oil and my last attempt at market using a lot more oil, I will see what happens to this formula when it is mixed and baked.  I will post my results whether good or bad and also post the formula after I have tried it.  I havenít decided what flour or flours to use in this next attempt.

If anyone has any ideas what I am doing right or wrong, let me know.  ::)

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23692
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #260 on: January 07, 2011, 10:05:35 PM »
My next attempt for this kind of pizza was made at home this evening.  This dough was also sticky, but it came around after doing more stretch and folds than my last attempt. I just dumped the dough into the deep-dish pan and then spread it around with my fingers.  I used 85% Durum flour and 15% Caputo flour for this attempt. My home oven can only go a little over 500 degrees F, so I baked this pie in the pan on the stone. This pie was also leavened with milk kefir, but it took way over 24 hrs.for it to ferment, at room temperature. I hadnít planned on this dough taking so long to ferment.

The dressing were simple on this pizza. I used fresh rosemary, sea salt, and grape tomatoes.

Pictures below

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23692
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #261 on: January 07, 2011, 10:07:56 PM »
rest of pictures

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23692
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #262 on: January 07, 2011, 10:33:15 PM »
I don't know why some of my pictures came out blurry, but I took 2 more pictures of a slice, after it cooled down.  The slice tastes good cold.

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline Jose L. Piedra

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 364
  • Location: Montreal, QC
  • Ebeddu e cavuru, e beddu davveru!
Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #263 on: January 08, 2011, 10:10:40 PM »
Looks like the interior blossomed nicely. What were its eating characteristics? (lightness, crispiness or softness, taste, etc.).

JLP
Scarsu d'ogghiu, e riccu di provolazzu ::)

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23692
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #264 on: January 09, 2011, 07:51:01 AM »
Jose,

The eating characteristics of this attempt were the interior was soft and light.  The bottom was crisp.  The taste of the crust was excellent, but I wasnít satisfied with this last experiment because there wasnít enough oven spring or as many irregular holes in the crumb (which makes this kind of pie lighter).  Since this last attempt wasnít baked at higher bake temperatures, it makes me wonder if my home oven doesnít get high enough to bake this kind of pizza right, or if my techniques arenít right.  I didnít change that much in this current formula. This dough felt elastic and did rise well after a long room temperature ferment. The dough could even windowpane while in the pan. I donít know if that makes a difference or not, how well this dough was mixed and handled. I know even one variable can change any pizza, but I did have better results at market, both times with baking at a higher temperature on the stone and in a pan.  This has me puzzled if I ever will be able to bake a decent pizza at home at my limited bake temperatures. The pie did taste good cold, even the next day. This pie took 14 minutes to bake. If anyone is interested I will post the formula I used.

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Online Jackie Tran

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 7136
  • Location: Albuquerque NM
Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #265 on: January 09, 2011, 08:08:07 AM »
This dough felt elastic and did rise well after a long room temperature ferment. The dough could even windowpane while in the pan. I donít know if that makes a difference or not, how well this dough was mixed and handled. I know even one variable can change any pizza, but I did have better results at market, both times with baking at a higher temperature on the stone and in a pan.  This has me puzzled if I ever will be able to bake a decent pizza at home at my limited bake temperatures. The pie did taste good cold, even the next day. This pie took 14 minutes to bake. If anyone is interested I will post the formula I used.

Norma

Norma, I think you are doing a great job and making good progress.  I do empathize with your fustrations with experimentation in the home setting.  It often doesn't go my way and it's not due to lack of desire, willingness, or effort.  I'm left dumbfounded at my failures sometimes and also wonder if it's just my lack of skill or lack of specialize equipment. 

I think great products, including this particular pie, can be made in the home setting but it can also be much more challenging.   I agree that you may need a higher heat initially to boost the oven spring as well.  I have experimented with superheating the stone near the heat source and moving it away prior to loading your panned dough.  Or even loading the pan on a superhot stone with the top burner going for just the first 2-3 minutes of the bake to get that spring and then moving the pan away from the heat source with the temps dialed down for the remainder of the bake.  I don't know if these tricks do make a difference at this point but I try anyway.  :P

For me, not having the proper equipment forces me to be more aware of what I'm doing and why and therefore forces me to improve my techniques and understanding.  For this disability I am thankful and can really appreciate even more great products from home settings knowing the tremendous amount of effort and skill involved.

Keep it up Norma, I believe you WILL achieve your goals. 

Chau
« Last Edit: January 09, 2011, 08:36:01 AM by Jackie Tran »

Offline Jose L. Piedra

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 364
  • Location: Montreal, QC
  • Ebeddu e cavuru, e beddu davveru!
Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #266 on: January 09, 2011, 08:32:07 AM »
Quote
If anyone is interested I will post the formula I used.

I'd be very interested.

JLP
Scarsu d'ogghiu, e riccu di provolazzu ::)


Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23692
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #267 on: January 09, 2011, 09:00:19 AM »
Norma, I think you are doing a great job and making good progress.  I do empathize with your fustrations with experimentation in the home setting.  It often doesn't go my way and it's not due to lack of desire, willingness, or effort.  I'm left dumbfounded at my failures sometimes and also wonder if it's just my lack of skill or lack of specialize equipment. 

I think great products, including this particular pie, can be made in the home setting but it can also be much more challenging.   I agree that you may need a higher heat initially to boost the oven spring as well.  I have experimented with superheating the stone near the heat source and moving it away prior to loading your panned dough.  Or even loading the pan on a superhot stone with the top burner going for just the first 2-3 minutes of the bake to get that spring and then moving the pan away from the heat source with the temps dialed down for the remainder of the bake.  I don't know if these tricks do make a difference at this point but I try anyway.  :P

For me, not having the proper equipment forces me to be more aware of what I'm doing and why and therefore forces me to improve my techniques and understanding.  For this disability I am thankful and can really appreciate even more great products from home settings knowing the tremendous amount of effort and skill involved.

Keep it up Norma, I believe you WILL achieve your goals. 

Chau

Chau,

Thanks for your encouragement.  ;D  I am a lot like you, that I do enjoy experimenting and then seeing the results, but sometimes, the results are confusing, and then I donít know what plan of attack to try next.  :-D This dough looked the same as my dough at market, but I sure didnít know what was going on inside the dough, or if the lower bake temperatures were the difference in this attempt.

I also believe this kind of pizza can be made in a home oven, but havenít found the right combination of dough or either another kind of pan to try.  This kind of dough and pizza are harder to understand, in my opinion, than any other doughs I have tried.  The combination of high hydration and oil can make this dough tough to understand.  My first pizza at market didnít use any oil and it was the lightest pie made. The added oil does contribute to a soft crumb though.  That was my second attempt at market.

Thanks for giving me ideas about tricks to try.  :) I will take your advise, when I do the next attempt at home.  I am still going over what I could have done wrong.  I had watched many videos of people baking this type of pie in home ovens, and it looked like they were successful, but the crumb didnít look as irregular as the pizzerias. 

I know you have done many experiments to find out what works best and are very successful in trying out all your ideas for pizzas or breads.  I commend you for taking the time to learn and to help others on their journey to learn.  ;D

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23692
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #268 on: January 09, 2011, 09:06:05 AM »
I'd be very interested.

JLP

Jose,

This is the formula I used.  If you need to know to know anything else I did to this dough, let me know.

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline Jose L. Piedra

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 364
  • Location: Montreal, QC
  • Ebeddu e cavuru, e beddu davveru!
Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #269 on: January 09, 2011, 09:48:46 AM »
Norma: I was cruising through the Molino sul Clitunno site at http://www.molinosulclitunno.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=35&Itemid=55

I note that their 00 Pizza Classic flour, which the blurb says is recommended for pizza in teglia, has a protein rating of 13-14.5%. The 00 SR Pizza, which they recommend for pizza alla pala (i.e. the same style baked directly on a stone) has an even higher protein rating. Do you think using a flour high in protein would help get the results you want?

JLP
Scarsu d'ogghiu, e riccu di provolazzu ::)

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23692
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #270 on: January 09, 2011, 10:07:20 AM »
Norma: I was cruising through the Molino sul Clitunno site at http://www.molinosulclitunno.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=35&Itemid=55

I note that their 00 Pizza Classic flour, which the blurb says is recommended for pizza in teglia, has a protein rating of 13-14.5%. The 00 SR Pizza, which they recommend for pizza alla pala (i.e. the same style baked directly on a stone) has an even higher protein rating. Do you think using a flour high in protein would help get the results you want?

JLP

Jose,

Thanks for referencing the link from Molino sul Clitunno. 

I am not sure what kind of flour will give the best results in trying to make this kind of pizza.  I have seen people that have used Caputo Red and Blue in combination and have gotten great results. 

In my opinion we could try experiments on combining higher and lower protein flours to see if the desired results could be achieved, but I donít know what my next attempt will include at this point. 

I am still trying to figure out how to bake this kind of pizza in temperature and whether to bake it on a stone or in a pan.  Also what oil percent to try, is confusing me.

Let me know if you have any ideas for me to try.

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23692
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #271 on: January 15, 2011, 09:09:05 AM »
These are 3 experimental pizzas I made that were Sicilian style, last evening.  All three used the poolish from my preferment Lehmann dough.  They were all high hydration doughs and had varying amounts of bulk room temperature and cold temperature ferments.  Each dough had different flours added.

I did post the other pictures at Reply 716 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,9908.msg123330.html#msg123330

These pictures were taken this morning after the slices were cold.  I will take these slices, (plus the rest of the slices) along with some of Lesís sauce and other foods to my great-granddaughterís first birthday today.

Pictures below,

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline Jose L. Piedra

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 364
  • Location: Montreal, QC
  • Ebeddu e cavuru, e beddu davveru!
Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #272 on: January 20, 2011, 11:45:14 AM »
Norma,

Your latest look very much like the ones Bakerboy sells commercially at Black Lab Bakeries, pictures of which you posted in this thread at reply 105 over a year ago. Did they eat as well as they photographed? You mentioned that they were made according to different formulas; although they all look similar, did some eat differently from the others?

JLP
Scarsu d'ogghiu, e riccu di provolazzu ::)

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23692
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #273 on: January 20, 2011, 12:25:59 PM »
Norma,

Your latest look very much like the ones Bakerboy sells commercially at Black Lab Bakeries, pictures of which you posted in this thread at reply 105 over a year ago. Did they eat as well as they photographed? You mentioned that they were made according to different formulas; although they all look similar, did some eat differently from the others?

JLP

Jose,

I donít know if you saw my post in the preferment Lehmann dough thread or not, but the first pizza pictured was the lightest pizza made.  At reply 721 I told about the three experiments and some of the things I learned from them. http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,9908.msg123366.html#msg123366

These were all good pizzas, but still not what I am trying to make.  The crust on the first pizza was light and there was a good taste in the crust. All three pizzas used a poolish. I donít know what would have happened if I would have made these three attempts thinner.  I think I would have gotten more oven spring, but donít know. 

All three did eat differently.  These really arenít like Bakerboyís, that I had tried awhile ago.  When I tried Bakerboyís although they did have good oven spring they were drier. 

I only did these experiments because I had leftover poolish from market last week.  I baked all three pizzas on an upside down steel pan in my home oven.

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 23692
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #274 on: January 24, 2011, 09:04:55 PM »
I made this dough yesterday and use the formula posted below.  I used the slowly mixing in of the flour over stages to strengthen the dough.  I could see by adding the flour slowly how much better the gluten formed.  The dough was sticky, but became less sticky after folding it over on itself different times. The pictures of the dough were taken yesterday.  Now it is cold fermenting. This dough did feel strong this morning.  It did rise about three times its initial size until lunch today.  Until this afternoon the dough had hit the lid on the container.  I am going to try and bake this dough tomorrow and see if it get anything like a Pizzarium pizza.  If it doesnít I will post the pictures under this thread.  If this dough behaves it will get some Prosciutto Di Parma placed on it.  :-D

Iíve had enough problems trying to make a pizza something like Pizzarium.  That is why I am posting under this thread, until I see the results tomorrow.

I will see if the sun sets on this dough like the last picture.

Pictures and formula below

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!


 

pizzapan