Author Topic: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.  (Read 40249 times)

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Offline norma427

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Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« on: December 31, 2009, 09:30:55 PM »
What? ANOTHER pizza recipe?!

Hey, pizza is like chocolate layer cake, Chinese food, and macaroni and cheese: you can eat it your whole life, and somehow never get tired of it.

Still, variations on the theme are always welcome. And Pizza Sfincioni, with its thick layer of crunchy bread crumbs on top, is unusual indeed.

Alternately called Palermo Christmas pizza; Sfincione di San Giovanni; or just plain Sfincione, this thick, soft, Sicilian-style pizza is traditionally served on Christmas Eve, New Yearís Eve, Good Friday, and  on the feast of San Giovanni, June 24.

Making the New Yearís pizza, now..  Happy New Year!  Will post pics later..

Norma
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Offline norma427

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Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #1 on: December 31, 2009, 11:38:48 PM »
This recipe is on the King Arthur Flour website.  I decided to try this recipe because it had Japanese Bread Flakes as a dressing.  Since I havenít tried much with Sicilian pizza and the King Arthur Flour website said this pizza was a favorite for New Years Eve, I thought the pizza is fitting for tonight.
The crunchy crust was very tasty.  The Japanese Bread Flakes gave this pizza a totally different crunch on top.  We enjoyed the pizza.  The cheese goes on the dough first, sauce with onions, more cheese and Japanese Bread Flakes on top.
Norma
« Last Edit: January 01, 2010, 02:15:11 PM by norma427 »
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Offline norma427

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Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2009, 11:40:38 PM »
The rest of the pictures.
Happy New Year
Norma
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Offline norma427

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Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #3 on: January 01, 2010, 06:54:03 AM »
 This thick, Sicilian-style pizza ? "Pizza Sfincione" ? is filled with a simple mixture of tomato sauce, onions, and cheese. Sounds familiar so far, right? Here comes the twist: it's sprinkled with bread crumbs bathed in olive oil, which bake into a crunchy, tasty topping.

Sfincione, loosely translated as "thick sponge," refers to the pizza's thickness and texture. Soft and just mildly chewy, it's a Sicilian tradition on Christmas Eve, New Year's Eve, and Good Friday. The rest of the year, it's a staple at bakeries, where it's prepared in large rectangular pans, and sold by the square.
Ingredients View by: Volume Weight
Crust

    * 3 cups King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
    * 1 1/4 teaspoons salt
    * 2 teaspoons instant yeast
    * 4 teaspoons Pizza Dough Flavor, optional but delicious
    * 2 tablespoons olive oil
    * 3/4 cup + 2 tablespoons to 1 cup + 2 tablespoons lukewarm water*
    * *Use the lesser amount in summer (or in a humid environment), the greater amount in winter (or in a dry climate), and somewhere in between the rest of the year, or if your house is climate controlled.

Topping

    * 2 large sweet onions
    * 28-ounce can chopped or diced tomatoes
    * 2 teaspoons Pizza Seasoning, optional
    * 2 cups shredded mozzarella
    * 4 ounces provolone, shredded
    * 3/4 to 1 cup freshly shredded Parmesan cheese
    * 3 cups coarse dried bread crumbs, such as Panko
    * 6 tablespoons olive oil
    * 1 tablespoon Pizza Seasoning, optional

Crust

    * 12 3/4 ounces King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
    * 1 1/4 teaspoons salt
    * 2 teaspoons instant yeast
    * 4 teaspoons Pizza Dough Flavor, optional but delicious
    * 7/8 ounce olive oil
    * 7 to 9 ounces lukewarm water*
    * *Use the lesser amount in summer (or in a humid environment), the greater amount in winter (or in a dry climate), and somewhere in between the rest of the year, or if your house is climate controlled.

Topping

    * 2 pounds sweet onions
    * 28-ounce can chopped or diced tomatoes
    * 2 teaspoons Pizza Seasoning, optional
    * 8 ounces shredded mozzarella
    * 4 ounces provolone, shredded
    * 3 to 4 ounces freshly shredded Parmesan cheese
    * 6 ounces coarse dried bread crumbs, such as Panko
    * 2 5/8 ounces olive oil
    * 1 tablespoon Pizza Seasoning, optional

Directions

1) To make the crust: Combine all of the ingredients and mix and knead to make a smooth, soft dough, using a stand mixer, bread machine, or your hands.

2) Place the dough in a lightly greased bowl or large 8-cup measure (or leave it in the bread machine), and let it rise till it's very puffy, about 90 minutes.

3) While the dough is rising, prepare the toppings. Start by peeling and slicing the onions, and frying them with a bit of olive oil till they're golden brown. This will take about 20 minutes. Midway through, add salt and sugar to taste, if desired; about 1 tablespoon sugar will heighten their flavor.

4) Add the tomatoes to the fried onions, along with the Pizza Seasoning, if desired. Simmer and stir for a couple of minutes. If the sauce seems overly liquid, continue to cook till it's firmed up a bit. You don't want it totally dry, like scrambled eggs, but neither do you want it swimming in liquid. Use your judgment. Turn off the heat, and let the mixture cool while the dough rises.

5) Stir together the bread crumbs, oil, and Pizza Seasoning, if you're using it. Set it aside.

6) Spray a large rimmed baking sheet (a 13" x 18" half sheet pan is perfect) with non-stick vegetable oil spray. Drizzle it with olive oil, tilting the pan so the oil spreads out a bit.

7) Gently deflate the risen dough, and stretch it into an oval in your hands. Plop the oval onto the baking sheet, and press it towards the edges. When it starts to fight back, walk away for 15 minutes. When you return, you should be able to press it to the edges and nearly into the corners. If you can't, give it another short rest, and try again. You want the dough to cover as much of the pan's bottom as possible (without making yourself too crazy about it).

8) Cover the dough, and let it rise till puffy, about 90 minutes. Towards the end of the rising time, preheat the oven to 425̊F.

9) Uncover the dough, and sprinkle it with the shredded mozzarella and provolone. Then spread the tomato/onion sauce over the cheese.

10) Top with the Parmesan, then the bread crumbs.

11) Bake the pizza for 35 minutes, or until the crust and crumbs are brown. Remove it from the oven, and serve it hot or warm. Hint: to prevent a soggy bottom crust, cut the pizza in half crosswise, then lift each half onto a cooling rack. Cut individual slices with a pair of scissors.

Yield: about 12 servings.
            
I tried to look for the recipe on King Arthur Flour homepage under recipes.  I couldnít find the recipe with a link.  I received a newsletter in my email from King Arthur Flour and it linked me to this recipe.  I also tried to copy the link and paste on word.  It still didnít work.  If anyone is interested in this recipe, here are the directions to make the pizza.

The changes I made to this recipe were to mix the yeast, water, and about 3 tablespoons flour (from the volume measurements ) first and let that rest for about 45 minutes.  Didnít use the Pizza Dough flavor.  Used 9 ounces of warm water.  Sea salt for pizza dough.  Only one large sweet onion, and added some crispy toasted onion bits near the end of frying the sweet onion.  No pizza seasoning in the topping.  Used Italian seasoning added to the Japanese Bread Flakes with oil. Used provolone, mozzarella, grated Parmesan and shredded Parmesan.  Pam to spray baking sheet, then more olive oil drizzled on baking sheet than they called for. Didnít bake over a stone, just on the middle oven rack.  The dough was very sticky and tried to open it like a pizza.  That didnít work, so just put in pan and pushed with my fingers until the dough was spread on the pan.   When the dough was rising the second time on the pan, it rose to about double in size. Added some Italian seasoning, sugar, and sea salt to tomato mixture.  Kneaded the dough by hand.
Some of things I like about this pizza were the really crunchy crust, blend of cheeses, and I really liked the crunchy top made with the Japanese Bread Flakes mixed with Italian seasoning and olive oil.  Will have to try those on another pizza.

Norma
« Last Edit: January 01, 2010, 07:36:56 AM by norma427 »
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Offline tdeane

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Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #4 on: January 01, 2010, 02:03:41 PM »
They made a pizza like this at Ben's on 7th Ave in Park Slope, Brooklyn. I used to get a slice quite often and I loved it. I've thought quite often about doing something similar at my place. They used to call it something else, but i can't remember what.

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Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #5 on: January 01, 2010, 02:09:25 PM »
tdeane,
If you can think of what it was called or have other ideas for what you might add, please post. 
I found this fairly easy to make and the crunchy Japanese Bread Flakes really seemed to add to the final pizza.
Norma
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Offline tdeane

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Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #6 on: January 01, 2010, 02:20:32 PM »
tdeane,
If you can think of what it was called or have other ideas for what you might add, please post. 
I found this fairly easy to make and the crunchy Japanese Bread Flakes really seemed to add to the final pizza.
Norma
I'll try to remember. It's possible that they called it a Palermo slice, but that doesn't seem quite right. I am almost positive that there was no mozzarella on the pizza. It was just there normal Sicilian crust with tomato sauce, caramelized onions and a nice slightly crispy bread crumb and parm(possibly pecorino) topping(lot's of olive oil too). It was delicious.

Offline norma427

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Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #7 on: January 01, 2010, 02:28:46 PM »
tdeane,
Thanks for the additional information.  Since you have tasted many Sicilian pizzas, do you mind telling me what your favorite was?
Norma
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Offline tdeane

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Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #8 on: January 01, 2010, 11:41:47 PM »
tdeane,
Thanks for the additional information.  Since you have tasted many Sicilian pizzas, do you mind telling me what your favorite was?
Norma
Well, Ben's in the Village used to have a good Sicilian slice but they have gone way down hill. Bleeker Street pizza has good Sicilian and Grandma slices. There was a place in Park Slope I went to once, I think it was near 5th and Union(it may have been 4th Ave) that had a good Sicilian slice. Does anyone remember this place? It was dingy with lots of wood paneling but the pizza was pretty good. Of course Di Fara has a great Sicilian pie but I usually had the regular slice there.
I was always more of a round pie kind of guy but that Sicilian pie with the caramelized onions and bread crumbs was one of my favorite things ever. Your version looks very good too Norma. You should send me one! lol I would also add that I don't think I have ever had a real Sicilian pizza made with semolina flour but just the NY Sicilian style pizza. Terry

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Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #9 on: January 01, 2010, 11:53:17 PM »
Terry,
Thanks for the compliment.  I would sure like to send you a slice and also taste your pizza.  :P Thanks for telling me where you think the best Sicilian pies are.  I have a daughter that lives in Brooklyn.  Maybe the next time I get to Brooklyn, I will give one of these places a try.  I also want to be able to experience Di Fara's.
Norma
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Offline ninapizza23

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Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #10 on: January 02, 2010, 09:05:23 PM »
Hi Norma427, remember me? I make sfincione very often after all I am from Palermo! When my mother eats my sfincione she says it is better than eating a steak. You can make the crust any way you want it but I like mine about 1/2" high and then crunchy in the bottom but soft dough. As far as the topping goes I make my life a little easier. For a 12x18 tray, I use 800g of dough, i chop 1 onion in cubes and fry it until it becomes translucent with some EVOO, than I put the onion in a plate and add a cup+  bread crumbs and mix it, than I add small pieces of CACIOCAVALLO cheese but if you don't have it you can use pecorino, to that I add oregano and pepper. I mix everything in the plate. Then, I spoon the tomato sauce on the dough, on top I spoon the mixture of onion,etc, I sprinkle some oil on top and then I put pieces of anchovies all over, then I put it in the oven. IT IS NOT SFINCIONE IF YOU DON'T PUT ANCHOVIES ON TOP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!.  I have some pix on my cell if you want to see them let me know.

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Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #11 on: January 02, 2010, 09:27:31 PM »
ninapizza23,
Yes, I remember you.  You commented favorably on my submission with the squash on the November Challenge. 
I didnít know it couldnít be called Sfincione if it didnít have anchovies on top.  ::)  I was just following what the recipe said and and what ingredients were supposed to be used.
Thank you for all your information.   :) It is really helpful for me and others. 
Do you caramelize the onions?  I had cooked mine slow for about 25 minutes and then added sugar and salt for about another 10 minutes.  It made the onions very sweet.
I would be interested in seeing your pies.  If you can post them, I would appreciate seeing them.
Thanks,
Norma
« Last Edit: January 02, 2010, 09:29:06 PM by norma427 »
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Offline Matthew

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Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #12 on: January 03, 2010, 07:58:11 AM »
Hi Norma427, remember me? I make sfincione very often after all I am from Palermo! When my mother eats my sfincione she says it is better than eating a steak. You can make the crust any way you want it but I like mine about 1/2" high and then crunchy in the bottom but soft dough. As far as the topping goes I make my life a little easier. For a 12x18 tray, I use 800g of dough, i chop 1 onion in cubes and fry it until it becomes translucent with some EVOO, than I put the onion in a plate and add a cup+  bread crumbs and mix it, than I add small pieces of CACIOCAVALLO cheese but if you don't have it you can use pecorino, to that I add oregano and pepper. I mix everything in the plate. Then, I spoon the tomato sauce on the dough, on top I spoon the mixture of onion,etc, I sprinkle some oil on top and then I put pieces of anchovies all over, then I put it in the oven. IT IS NOT SFINCIONE IF YOU DON'T PUT ANCHOVIES ON TOP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!.  I have some pix on my cell if you want to see them let me know.


Could you also please post your formula & regimen as well.  I am also from Sicily....I haven't had sfincione in ages & would love to make some.

Matt

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Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #13 on: January 03, 2010, 12:52:54 PM »
Matt,
I would like to hear how ninapizza23 makes her Sfincione, also.  I searched the web and came up with a few recipes.  Maybe ninapizza23 can reply as to their authenticity. 
I donít know if any of these Sfincione Sicilian recipes are authentic, but the ingredients sound good to me.  They seem to call for bread crumbs that are toasted or fried.  In the first recipe they call for the leavened dough to be wrapped in a woollen cloth.  I wonder what that means?   
Norma


Recipe 1

Measure   Ingredient
1 pounds    Leavened Bread Dough
1 pounds    Tomatoes; fresh, skinned and chop
4 ounces    Caciocavallo or Provola or other savory cheese; sliced
Ĺ cup    Pecorino or Parmesan cheese; grated
Ĺ cup    Dry bread crumbs
4     Anchovy fillets; chopped
1 medium    Onion; sliced
1 bunch    Parsley; chopped
Ĺ cup    Olive oil
     Salt
     Pepper

Work a glass of olive oil and the grated cheese into the leavened dough. Leave to prove for about an hour, wrapped in a woollen cloth. Meanwhile, in a little oil in a frying pan, gently fry the sliced onion, then add the parsley and the skinned tomatoes, cut into pieces. Season with salt and pepper and leave to simmer over low heat for 20 minutes. At this point, add the anchovies cut into pieces and the sliced caciocavallo or other cheese. Mix well and draw off the heat. In an oiled, deep-sided baking tin or dish, spread out the paste to the thickness of about an inch-and-a-quarter. With your fingers, make a few holes in the top, pour over half the sauce and bake in a hot oven. After about 15 minutes, take the tin out, pour in the remaining sauce and dredge with fried breadcrumbs. Trickle over a little oil and replace in the oven for 30 minutes. Recipe by: Sicilian Cookery Posted to MC-Recipe Digest V1 #1048 by Lisa Minor <lisa@...> on
   

Recipe 2       

Remove Formatting from selectionOne of my regular readers (from Philadelphia) is passionate about Sicily. She has sent me some wonderful photographs from her trip (mainly from Palermo) and she has very kindly given me permission to use them on my blog.

I asked her about this particular photograph because I could not identify what was being served. The photo was taken in front of Antica Focacceria San Francesco during Sunday brunch (al fresco). The piazzetta in front of the Antica Focacceria is across from the wonderful church of Saint Francis of Assisi which has the sculpture of Serpotta.

She has identified it as a sfincione di Palermo. It is a type of focaccia /pizza sold in the streets of Palermo but also known in some other parts of the north- western part of the coast. There are many bread dough /focaccia like pastries made all over Sicily with different fillings and called by different names.( See my previous post on Meat- Impanata).


She says that what is interesting and gives the sfincione a bit of a unique appearance is that it is baked for a short time with about 1/2 of the sauce, then taken out of the oven and recovered with the remaining sauce, "dredged with fried bread crumbs" and baked again. It is the bread crumbs in the end that give it the look.

She tells me that the ingredients are:
500 gr. bread dough, 500 gr. fresh tomatoes, 100 gr. fresh caciocavallo or provola cheese (cubed), 50 gr. pecorino (grated) 50 gr. bread crumbs, 4 anchovy fillets, 1 large onion, a bunch of parsley 125 ml olive oil.

Prepare a basic pizza dough using fresh or active dry yeast, warm water, a little salt and approx. 3 cups of good quality unbleached flour. Leave it to prove in a bowl covered it with a folded tea towel/ tablecloth for about an hour.
Work about 1 glass of olive oil and the grated cheese (the pecorino) into the leavened dough. Leave it to prove again till doubled in size.

The tomatoes are made into a salsa: soften the sliced onion until golden, then add the parsley and the peeled, chopped tomatoes. Simmer till thickened
(about 20 minutes). Allow to cool slightly.

Add the anchovies and the caciocavallo.

Oil a deep sided baking pan and spread out the dough to about 3cm thick. Using your fingers make a few depressions into the dough.

Pour half of the sauce over the dough and bake it in a hot oven. After about 15 minutes, pour on the remaining sauce and dredge with fried breadcrumbs.

Drizzle with a little more oil and bake it for about 30 minutes.

Recipe 3       

ANYONE FOR ANCHOVIES

Sicilian Pizza, or Sfincione as my grandmother called it, is a nice thick pizza almost more like a bread with the ingredient pushed into the top of the dough. Itís a bit of a change from the traditional thin crust pizza we all know and love but delicious just the same.

Traditionally this pizza is made with no mozzarella cheese and is topped with anchovies, onions and black olives. In many Italian recipes, if you have a desire for authentic Italian flavor, anchovies play a very important part. Many years ago they were very popular as toppings for pizza but through the years pepperoni turns out to be the number one favorite.

If your going to make this Sicilian Pizza make sure you use the anchovies or weíll just have to call it something else.

INGREDIENTS

# Basic Pizza Dough
# 1 large yellow onion, finely chopped
# 10 black olives, pitted and spliced
# 6 anchovies fillets, finely chopped
# 1 15oz can of tomato sauce
# 1/2 cup of bread crumbs, toasted
# 1 Tbls of dried oregano
# 1/4 cup of extra virgin olive oil

PREPARATION

# In a small frying pan sautť onions for 2 minutes.
# Rub a little oil on a cookie sheet or pizza pan.
# Gently shape the dough into a round or square shape
# Push the pieces of anchovy, olives and onions into the top of the dough. I just use the back of a knife to accomplish this.
# Spread the tomato sauce all over the top.
# Sprinkle with the oregano and breadcrumbs.
# Cover it up an let it sit for 2 hours to rise into a thicker dough.
# Pre-heat oven to 425 degrees
# Bake for 30 minutes and drizzle the remaining olive oil over the top before serving.
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Offline Matthew

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Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #14 on: January 03, 2010, 03:41:51 PM »
Hi Norma,
My family is from Sicily, & sfincione is something that is unfamiliar to me so I called up my grandmother to ask her.  She told me that it is something that is very popular in Palermo & is often referred to as "sfincione palermitano".  Like most pizzas, there are many dough variations, all of which are high hydration doughs; as high as 100%.  Authentic sfincione dough is made with strutto (reconstituted pork fat) that is diluted in tepid water.  It's topped firstly with acciughe (anchovies) & then with a fried onion, tomato puree, & pan fried toasted bread crumb mixture & of course sicilian olive oil.  It's baked for about half hour before being topped with finely diced caciocavallo cheese and then baked for a few more minutes to melt the cheese.  She said that next time I go over she'll make it for me.

Matt

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Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #15 on: January 03, 2010, 04:12:05 PM »
Hi Norma,
My family is from Sicily, & sfincione is something that is unfamiliar to me so I called up my grandmother to ask her.  She told me that it is something that is very popular in Palermo & is often referred to as "sfincione palermitano".  Like most pizzas, there are many dough variations, all of which are high hydration doughs; as high as 100%.  Authentic sfincione dough is made with strutto (reconstituted pork fat) that is diluted in tepid water.  It's topped firstly with acciughe (anchovies) & then with a fried onion, tomato puree, & pan fried toasted bread crumb mixture & of course sicilian olive oil.  It's baked for about half hour before being topped with finely diced caciocavallo cheese and then baked for a few more minutes to melt the cheese.  She said that next time I go over she'll make it for me.

Matt

Matt,
Thanks for the information.  The strutto, (reconstituted pork fat) sounds interesting.  I wonder if they use this instead of olive oil in the dough? 
Great to hear how original recipes are made from the places they started. 
Nice to hear your grandmother is going to make her authentic Sfincione for you.
Norma
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Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #16 on: January 03, 2010, 04:32:59 PM »
Norma,

I've not made the sfincione dough (with semolina) but I can vouch for adding pork fat to dough. It helps give a tender crumb. It's also used in neapolitan 'lard bread' and 'casatiello' (like a savoury brioche).

Cheers,

Toby

Offline Mare

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Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #17 on: January 03, 2010, 04:41:14 PM »

It's topped . . . with (anchovies) . . . fried onion, tomato puree, & pan fried toasted bread crumb mixture & . . . caciocavallo cheesea


Those are the ingredients in Nick Malgieri's recipe.  I've tried it, but felt the dough was too thick.  I really liked the anchovies, though!

Mare

Offline Matthew

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Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #18 on: January 03, 2010, 05:04:49 PM »
Those are the ingredients in Nick Malgieri's recipe.  I've tried it, but felt the dough was too thick.  I really liked the anchovies, though!

Mare


I have no idea who Nick Malgieri is, nor have I  ever read his recipe.  His topping are likely the same because they are the traditional toppings for sfincione alla Palermitana.

Matt

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Re: Felice Anno Nuovo! Pizza Sfincione to greet the new year.
« Reply #19 on: January 03, 2010, 05:18:54 PM »
Infidel,
I didnít use semolina in the dough I had made for the Sfincione.  I used regular King Arthur all purpose flour.  I must have had a high hydration because the dough was really sticky.  I used volume measurement.  Do you mind telling me how you added pork fat to the dough?  Was it from the pork being cooked, or fried?
Thanks for the information.
Norma

Mare,
Iím sure you could change one of these dough formulas or Nick Malgieriís recipe to get the desired type of crust you are looking for.  I am not an expert on changing formulas if you like something like Sfincione.
Great to hear you liked the anchovies.
Norma

Matt,
Did your grandmother say anything about using semolina in the dough?  Since you make Sicilian  pies you would know more than I do. Do Sfincione and (ďSfincione alla PalermitanaĒ) mean the same kind of pie?
Norma
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