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Author Topic: Equipment for new business?  (Read 3297 times)

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Offline jonesmi

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Equipment for new business?
« on: September 24, 2010, 12:24:56 PM »
I many not have enough information yet to be asking some of these questions but thought I would.  I am working with a couple of people on opening a gourmet delivery/carry out pizza business.  My role would primarily be more of an investor and general manager.  I am not a pizza chef, so these might be some pretty basic questions (I am a pastry chef)...

We are trying to differentiate ourselves in the market by offering a more gourmet product than pizza hut, dominoes, etc.  That being said, we have been talking about wood fired ovens.  My personal experience is that this produces the best pizza, but I am trying to determine if this is practical for a delivery business.   I know you can cook pizza really fast in these ovens, but is the capacity adequate?

Also, curious about mixers.  I have always been told that spiral mixers make the best doughs for bread.  Is this true for pizza dough as well?

Thanks!

Offline scott r

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Re: Equipment for new business?
« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2010, 04:23:18 PM »
Spiral mixers are really good, and definitely have the advantage in the US of being locally produced, therefore not too expensive.   Still, I think a diving arm mixer or fork mixer would be the ultimate best.   The differences between them are slight enough that you might not even notice if you were using bromated or typical american high gluten pizza flour.   With import costs they can be very very expensive unfortunately. 

Wood fired ovens can make an amazing pizza, but its really all about even heat and the ability to get higher heat than a typical american deck oven that tops out at 600 or so.  Lately there are lots of new ovens becoming available to us here in the US that can do high temps, but are not wood burning ovens.   Beware, though.   Especially for take out and delivery faster is not always better.   If you spend some time making high temp pizzas you may find that they do not hold up nearly as well to 30 minutes+ from oven to mouth which can be quite common.   Higher temp is good, but HIGH temp can actually be very bad for a pizza that is going to sit around for a while before its eaten.   I think you will find that most neapolitan pizzerias do very little take out, and almost never do delivery.   

To sum it all up, you might find that you really like an artesian medium temp (higher than typical) pizza the best, as it can still be done without the high costs of wood (wood works too if you really want it but adds lots of expense and extra employee training).   

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Equipment for new business?
« Reply #2 on: September 24, 2010, 05:16:06 PM »
I think you will find that most neapolitan pizzerias do very little take out, and almost never do delivery.   

scott r,

I remember several years ago raising the matter of delivery of Neapolitan style pizzas with Charlie Restivo, then the chief pizza maker at Naples 45 in NYC (and now with the parent company's Orlando operation), when I saw that Naples 45 delivered pizzas. At the time, Naples 45 was using a blend of the Caputo 00 Pizzeria flour and the Caputo Rosso (Red) 00 flour and using Earthstone ovens (if I recall correctly). I couldn't imagine how a cooled down Neapolitan style pizza could taste any good but Charlie told me that many of his customers actually liked the delivery pizzas better than the ones baked in the restaurant. I did a check today at the Naples 45 website at http://naples45nyc.com/food-delivery/Naples-45-New-York-City.309.r?QueryStringValue=2mQFl3oySeE+OjgFOZ6StQ==, and it appears that they are still delivering pizza.

Peter

Offline cranky

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Re: Equipment for new business?
« Reply #3 on: September 26, 2010, 09:39:52 AM »
scott r,

I remember several years ago raising the matter of delivery of Neapolitan style pizzas with Charlie Restivo, then the chief pizza maker at Naples 45 in NYC (and now with the parent company's Orlando operation), when I saw that Naples 45 delivered pizzas. At the time, Naples 45 was using a blend of the Caputo 00 Pizzeria flour and the Caputo Rosso (Red) 00 flour and using Earthstone ovens (if I recall correctly). I couldn't imagine how a cooled down Neapolitan style pizza could taste any good but Charlie told me that many of his customers actually liked the delivery pizzas better than the ones baked in the restaurant. I did a check today at the Naples 45 website at http://naples45nyc.com/food-delivery/Naples-45-New-York-City.309.r?QueryStringValue=2mQFl3oySeE+OjgFOZ6StQ==, and it appears that they are still delivering pizza.

Peter

All pizzas, not just Neapolitan, lose a lot in delivery in my opinion, some more than others.  It is difficult for a crispy crust with crunch covered with sauce and moist ingredients to hold up in a box full of steam.   What would happen to a pastry that was put in a closed box hot out of the oven?  Breads are the same.   They lose their crust in a sealed bag.  Gourmet home delivered pizza is going to be difficult. 

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Equipment for new business?
« Reply #4 on: September 26, 2010, 10:59:38 AM »
cranky,

What I neglected to mention is that Naples 45 is located in the MetLife building in Mid-town Manhattan, right near Grand Central Station. There are a ton of office buildings and professional offices nearby. I woudn't be surprised if the pizzas are delivered mainly to offices rather than homes. The pizzas might hold up better under such conditions.

Peter

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Offline cranky

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Re: Equipment for new business?
« Reply #5 on: September 26, 2010, 05:03:34 PM »
cranky,

What I neglected to mention is that Naples 45 is located in the MetLife building in Mid-town Manhattan, right near Grand Central Station. There are a ton of office buildings and professional offices nearby. I woudn't be surprised if the pizzas are delivered mainly to offices rather than homes. The pizzas might hold up better under such conditions.

Peter

Peter,
They are probably delivered one or a few at a time and never go into a car and sit in traffic.  If a dozen pizzas are loaded in a car and especially in those plastic thermo jackets you see, the conditions are very different.  A few minutes in a box is different from 20.  The last time I had a pizza delivered was to a hotel room in Annaheim.  I got in late, was too beat to go out, and needed to get up for an early morning meeting.  Never again!
Cranky

Offline quietdesperation

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Re: Equipment for new business?
« Reply #6 on: September 28, 2017, 12:47:57 PM »
scott r,

I remember several years ago raising the matter of delivery of Neapolitan style pizzas with Charlie Restivo, then the chief pizza maker at Naples 45 in NYC (and now with the parent company's Orlando operation), when I saw that Naples 45 delivered pizzas. At the time, Naples 45 was using a blend of the Caputo 00 Pizzeria flour and the Caputo Rosso (Red) 00 flour and using Earthstone ovens (if I recall correctly). I couldn't imagine how a cooled down Neapolitan style pizza could taste any good but Charlie told me that many of his customers actually liked the delivery pizzas better than the ones baked in the restaurant. I did a check today at the Naples 45 website at http://naples45nyc.com/food-delivery/Naples-45-New-York-City.309.r?QueryStringValue=2mQFl3oySeE+OjgFOZ6StQ==, and it appears that they are still delivering pizza.

Peter

peter,

  I'd occasionally take clients to naples45 for lunch, thought it to be the typical, overpriced midtown restaurant but the food was pretty good. I was visiting my client in the metlife building one day around 3pm, hadn't had time for lunch, popped into naples45 takeout corner and found what I think of to this day as the best lunch deal in NYC: after 2pm, $1.25 for one of their very good neo-Neapolitan (closer to ny stye really) slices (a bit more for toppings). The price slowly rose but when I retired, it was still a wonderful deal.

best,
« Last Edit: September 28, 2017, 12:51:56 PM by quietdesperation »
"Is that a pie fit for a king
A wondrous sweet
And most particular thing?" - sweeney todd

Offline quietdesperation

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Re: Equipment for new business?
« Reply #7 on: October 30, 2017, 11:23:51 AM »
stopped by naples45 for a slice last week, the price is now $1.50, unfortunately, the pizza wasn't as good as I remembered it, they still use quality ingredients but the crust of the elite style ny slice had far too much chew. Next time, I'll try one of their neo-style slices.
"Is that a pie fit for a king
A wondrous sweet
And most particular thing?" - sweeney todd

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Equipment for new business?
« Reply #8 on: October 30, 2017, 02:12:04 PM »
Strange that I should have just opened this question and I just recently submitted a Dough doctor Article for Pizza Today Magazine on exactly the same topic.
DELCO (delivery carry-out) pizzas take a terrible beating form being literally steamed in the box during the period between store and home.
In my opinion, anything gained be using a wood fired oven, or baking at thigh temperatures is totally lost once the pizza goes into the box or goes into DELCO. Air impingement ovens rule supreme in this arena as they offer excellent moisture control on the finished pizza making for a drier pizza to start with which CAN possibly result in a better customer experience once the pizza arrives at the customer's home. With that said, IF your customers have access to a pizza stone AND they re-freshen the pizza using the stone once they get the pizza to their home they CAN have a better experience with a pizza of the type which you describe. Even without a pizza stone a bit of consumer education will go a long ways in making your pizzas all that much better in the eyes of your customers. How to get pizza stones into the hands of your customers? Give them one for free......well, not exactly free. Have on hand a supply of pizza stones, here's the offer, buy a pizza stone for ($10.00/your cost or whatever it is) and get $1.00 off on each of your next ten pizza purchases, or make it $2.00 off on each of the next five pizza purchases....you see the picture. They will buy the stone, hopefully they'll use it (be sure to provide directions for YOUR pizzas) and then at $2.00 off on each of their next five pizza purchases they will come back to you for their pizzas, hopefully you can get them "hooked" on your pizzas with five purchases.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline woodfiredandrew

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Re: Equipment for new business?
« Reply #9 on: April 18, 2018, 11:24:28 PM »
once they have stone and learned to heat pizza up, next to make pizza on their own so they dont need to order..... :-D
just a flip side of equation :'(

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