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Author Topic: Ideal temperature for cold proofing  (Read 8241 times)

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Offline Jeep Pizza

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Ideal temperature for cold proofing
« on: November 01, 2010, 10:25:24 AM »
1. What is the ideal temperature for cold proofing pizza dough ( dough that is put in refrigerator for slow rise) ?
2. What would be the ideal temperature to proof bread dough?

I want to see if my temperature in the beer fridge is good for pizza dough or if it is to cold, and if it is to cold  I want to build a proofing box that could work for both pizza and bread. If that is not possible then I will have to build 2 proofing boxes.
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Ideal temperature for cold proofing
« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2010, 10:53:07 AM »
Jeep Pizza,

Commercial coolers used by professional pizza operators tend to run from 36-40 degrees F with a target temperature of 38 degrees F. Most standard home refrigerators run several degrees warmer because they are less efficient than commercial coolers. There will also be wider temperature variations with home refrigerators depending on how often the door is opened and closed, the types and number of items in the refrigerator, the way that such items are replenished, seasonal temperature variations, and where in the refrigerator items are physically placed in relation to the door. If you have a beer fridge that can be dedicated to dough (as well as beer, of course), you should see fewer temperature variations.

What is just as important as the refrigerator/cooler temperature is the finished dough temperature of the dough balls that are stored in the refrigerator/cooler. Professionals who monitor these temperatures strive to achieve a finished dough temperature of around 80-85 degrees F. Because of warmer operational temperatures, the corresponding numbers for a standard home refrigerator would be 75-80 degrees F.

Others may be able to help you with the corresponding information for bread doughs.

Peter
« Last Edit: November 22, 2010, 09:20:37 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline Jeep Pizza

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Re: Ideal temperature for cold proofing
« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2010, 12:04:07 PM »
Pete
   By finished dough temperature do you mean the temp before going into the fridge or the temp of the dough while in the fridge?
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Offline Guts

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Re: Ideal temperature for cold proofing
« Reply #3 on: November 01, 2010, 12:24:20 PM »
What I have found; The colder the temperature, the slower it will ferment. I do a three day (each) ferment at 33°f (with my three step feeding and dough)   at day 4-5 hooch will start to form on top. At warmer temperatures 40+ and up the hooch may form in a day or so. This is what I have found, others may not agree.

(with my three step feeding and dough) first feed, second feed, intermediate dough, finished dough.
..........................................................3days.......3days..........3days......................3days............total 12 days start to finish, but the finished dough may be used within 3-4 hours after being made. But better the next day or two.
« Last Edit: November 01, 2010, 12:31:13 PM by Guts »
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Ideal temperature for cold proofing
« Reply #4 on: November 01, 2010, 12:39:10 PM »
By finished dough temperature do you mean the temp before going into the fridge or the temp of the dough while in the fridge?

Jeep Pizza,

I mean the temperature when the dough comes out of the mixer and goes into the refrigerator. What Guts says is also true. If the finished dough temperature of the dough is below 75-80 degrees when it is placed in the refrigerator, or if the refrigerator operates at lower than normal temperatures, the dough will ferment more slowly because the activity of the yeast and enzymes slow down at the lower temperatures. If the dough ball is also small, that will also result in a longer window of fermentation because the dough ball will cool down faster than a larger dough ball. Using small amounts of yeast will have similar effects. A combination of these factors can lead to a dough ball that can last well over a week in the refrigerator.

Peter

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Offline mitchjg

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Re: Ideal temperature for cold proofing
« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2014, 11:41:49 AM »
Jeep Pizza,

Commercial coolers used by professional pizza operators tend to run from 36-40 degrees F with a target temperature of 38 degrees F. Most standard home refrigerators run several degrees warmer because they are less efficient than commercial coolers. There will also be wider temperature variations with home refrigerators depending on how often the door is opened and closed, the types and number of items in the refrigerator, the way that such items are replenished, seasonal temperature variations, and where in the refrigerator items are physically placed in relation to the door. If you have a beer fridge that can be dedicated to dough (as well as beer, of course), you should see fewer temperature variations.

What is just as important as the refrigerator/cooler temperature is the finished dough temperature of the dough balls that are stored in the refrigerator/cooler. Professionals who monitor these temperatures strive to achieve a finished dough temperature of around 80-85 degrees F. Because of warmer operational temperatures, the corresponding numbers for a standard home refrigerator would be 75-80 degrees F.

Others may be able to help you with the corresponding information for bread doughs.

Peter

Old thread here but it is along the lines of my question.

Normally, I use my fridge when I cold ferment and it is at 38 degrees.  When I do that, I typically use 0.25% IDY, generally following Jeff Varasano's approach on his website.

I usually use the dough after 3 days.

I am thinking of putting the dough balls in my beverage center/ wine fridge (2 doors, side by side, at 2 temperatures).  The beverage center only cools down to around 40-42.  I am unclear how much, if at all, to adjust the yeast amount.

I am thinking of 0.2% and then monitoring, etc. (but I do not want to open the door much, etc.).  If it looks like it is going too fast, I can scramble / shift all the dough to the fridge.

Any guidance here?
Mitch

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Offline mkevenson

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Re: Ideal temperature for cold proofing
« Reply #6 on: February 20, 2014, 06:15:29 PM »
My box gets to 40 F on max cold settings. That is ideal for me.
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Offline mitchjg

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Re: Ideal temperature for cold proofing
« Reply #7 on: February 20, 2014, 10:58:28 PM »
Not surprising it is in the same territory.  I was actually seeking whether or not to adjust the yeast level for the difference in fermentation temperature - not seeking to validate that I was in the right vicinity.

I decided to double check my regular fridge, set at 38.  Readings with my laser thermometer were around 42 +/2 in various spots.  So, the gap between the two fridges is less than I thought.  My guess is the fridge is just fine (sub zero, blah blah) - I would think it is the laser gun is not perfectly accurate.  Shrug.

I did decide to use 0.2% instead of 0.25%.  I figure I can begin warming the dough balls sooner if they need a boost near the end.

I am obsessing over this one more than usual since I am having a pizza party on Saturday.  10 dough balls stacked up in the fridge half of the beverage center beginning their vigil..................... :(

- Mitch
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Offline dmckean44

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Re: Ideal temperature for cold proofing
« Reply #8 on: February 21, 2014, 12:07:10 AM »
I wouldn't bother with adjusting the amount of yeast unless you were over five degrees different than what was assumed in the recipe.

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