A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Author Topic: New Haven apizza  (Read 1718 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Florida9

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 2
New Haven apizza
« on: December 22, 2012, 10:43:39 PM »
Forgive me if all of this is somewhere else on these boards, but I searched and couldn't find a decent answer.

What makes a New Haven "apizza?"

Is the general consensus that the dough is essentially NY-style dough? Is there any modification to the dough? Oil? Salt? Hydration level? Anything?

Also, what about the sauce? It seems to me the sauce is cooked, though it's clearly not a long cooked sauce. Again, somewhere along the lines of NY-style.

So, where is the difference in these two styles? (aside from the lack of cheese on the New Haven) How can I make a New Haven that isn't just a NY without the mozz?

Thanks for any assistance.



Offline ALCxKensei

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 3
  • Location: Connecticut
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: New Haven apizza
« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2017, 11:14:25 PM »
I grew up and live next to New Haven.  When I visit NYC I try to hit up the famous NYC pizzerias. That said, I would say that New Haven Style Apizza is different from traditional New York Style pizza but the distinctions can tend to blur depending on which NH and NY pizzerias you are care comparing. Let me explain...
 
New Haven style apizza varies among New Haven pizzerias if you really want to compare them.  In my personal opinion, New Haven style apizza falls on a pizza spectrum in between traditional NY style and true Neapolitan style pies. Like NY pies, they come in sizes of small, medium, and large, and are thin crust pizzas, but maybe just slightly thicker on average. Like Neapolitan pies, they are chewy, but it's a heavier chewiness accompanies by a nice crunch from the charring.   New Haven style pizzerias (which can be found throughout new haven county; I frequent places in Derby and West Haven) vary in these characteristics.   

1) The best examples of distinct NH style apizza are Pepe's and Sally's.  --> Brick Oven, Coal heated, thin crust, no thickness to the rim of crust, good char
2) NH apizza places like Bar, Modern, Zuppardi's, Roseland, and Ernie's start drifting more towards the New York side of the pizza spectrum. --> gas brick oven, wood fire brick oven, baker's pride; still thin crust, but maybe some thickness to the rim of crust; varying amounts of more or less char depending on the location
3) Then a place like Da Legna is probably most close to the Classic Neapolitan style side of the spectrum --> Brick wood fire oven, only smaller pies, more of a light Neapolitan chewiness to the crust, some puff to the rim

I think in general, New Haven apizza has a nice balance of greater chewiness to crunchiness than NY style pies.  I think these properties might be do to a combination of higher hydration in the dough recipe, a slightly longer cold ferment or use of cold water in the dough recipe, and generally a slightly hotter oven temperature. (Posts on this site suggest 65 to 68% hydration.) Honestly, new haven style dough/crust is where it's at in my opinion.  I'm still trying to figure it out. I'm usually unimpressed with the dough at a lot of NY places. Di Fara's pies in Brooklyn have the freshest tasting "tomato sauce and cheese" flavor experience of any pizza I've tasted, but their crust was very unremarkable in my opinion. Not bad by any means, but not noticeably better than many random convenient no name by-the-slice joints that populate NYC.   

One think I learned from working in an ok pizzeria is how fickle dough can be and the inevitability of certain thinks being off.  Even Pepe's has bad dough days where the dough is not up to standards. That's the nature of dough. Sometimes the person who mixes it is less experience or messes up the amounts without knowing. Other times the dough used to make your order was too young or too old.   

Offline foreplease

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2268
  • Age: 58
  • Location: St. Joseph, MI
Re: New Haven apizza
« Reply #2 on: October 18, 2017, 06:26:16 AM »
Great first post. Welcome to the forum ALCxKensei and Florida9
-Tony
I find it easier to imagine a diet of nothing but ice cream than one without ice cream

Offline Jersey Pie Boy

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3711
  • Location: New Jersey
Re: New Haven apizza
« Reply #3 on: October 18, 2017, 11:26:42 PM »
Thanks guys and welcome!


ALC, I've made a couple of pligrimages with the amount of pizza tried limited only by my time and appetite, LOL. I must have had an off-night at Pepe's because our half sausage/half clam was uninspiring..and the clam side just plain wet..doggone it. Zuppardi's was excellent on two trips, and yes, thicker. Didn't get to Sally's, but did grab a to-go pie at Modern. The take out department uses a seprate oven. The pie was unfortunate, partly burned...not charred, I love char, this was not that. The cheese and sauce slid off the pie when it was taken out of the box. Gummy crust, ugh. It was however, pirchased for research purproses and had no appetite-filling requirements. We'd eaten very well next door at DaLegna..love it on both visits. Plus, it made for a nice night out. Great place.


When we take our next trip north, what place(s) should we be sure not to miss? 

Offline rparker

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2408
Re: New Haven apizza
« Reply #4 on: October 19, 2017, 10:11:03 AM »
Welcome to the forum!

One think I learned from working in an ok pizzeria is how fickle dough can be and the inevitability of certain thinks being off.  Even Pepe's has bad dough days where the dough is not up to standards. That's the nature of dough. Sometimes the person who mixes it is less experience or messes up the amounts without knowing. Other times the dough used to make your order was too young or too old.   
This one still surprises me. Delicate balance.

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3639
  • Location: Manhattan, KS
    • Dough Doctor
Re: New Haven apizza
« Reply #5 on: October 19, 2017, 12:33:35 PM »
Florida9;
Welcome to the board!
I've always looked at a New Haven pizza as a New York style pizza but with a crispy crust. I make them in essentially the same manner but adjust the baking slightly to give me the characteristic crispy crust.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


 

wordpress