A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Author Topic: Substitutions and/or Additions (Flour/Yeast/Sugar/VWG)  (Read 6708 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline FRGus723

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 9
Substitutions and/or Additions (Flour/Yeast/Sugar/VWG)
« on: March 07, 2008, 11:56:59 AM »
I apologize if this has been answered in this forum already but I am at work and am short on time for my daughters first birthday party tomorrow.  I am a fairly new owner of KitchenAid Pro and Pizza Stone and Peel and by the looks of this forum I have way too much to learn.  Pete-zza you're a genius.

I have a basic NY Style pizza recipe (Alton's actually)  on Food Network (you can google Alton Brown Pizza and it is the Pizza Pizzas link.  Can't post links as a new member sorry.

The questions I have are with substitutions. 

His recipe has 5 1/2 teaspoons of sugar.  How would I substitute honey?

His recipe has 2 cups bread flour.  If I wanted to add some semolina for flavor can I simply substitute 1 cup AP and 1 cup Semolina?  Is a whole cup of semolina too much?  Maybe 1/4 or 1/2 cup instead?

He has no vital wheat gluten in his recipe and the pizzas I have made in the past here in Colorado seem to be more pliable with VWG.  How would I add that?  It says to use 1 teaspoon per cup of all-purpose or 1- 2 teaspoons per cup of bread flour.  I am using Hungarian High Altitude Flour which is a bread flour.  I do realize it has nothing to do with altitude but since I'm in CO and the wheat is from CO area it just makes me feel like I am utilizing local products :-)  Would I just add this in or do I need to remove 2 teaspoons of flour to accommodate for the added dry ingredients.

The last question is, if I am going to make this dough four times to accommodate all the people coming.  Should I make each dough, let each rise in the fridge overnight, take out tomorrow, separate into dough ball sizes and individually wrap in a ziploc bag and refrigerate until 2 hours before the party and let them come to room temp?  I guess I am trying to find out what the best way to store 4 whole dough recipes in the fridge the easiest would be (gooder grammar huh?).  Can I combine all of them into one giant dough ball and then separate tomorrow.  Should I keep them separate.  Can I divide them into portions before they've had time to cold rise?  Is it better to let the dough balls rise before splitting them.  Need help !!!

That's all for me.  I hope I get a response by tonight when I get home and start the insanity.

Thanks so much guys, this is one of the most helpful forums I have ever been on, great job.
FRGus723

Offline Pizza_Not_War

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 388
  • Location: Portland OR
Re: Substitutions and/or Additions (Flour/Yeast/Sugar/VWG)
« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2008, 01:10:11 PM »


The questions I have are with substitutions. 

His recipe has 5 1/2 teaspoons of sugar.  How would I substitute honey?


How should one substitute honey for sugar in recipes? - From Suebee Honey website!

Simply substitute honey cup for cup in place of sugar. As a rule reduce the liquid by a quarter cup for every cup of honey used. In baked goods add 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda for every cup of honey used and bake at a temperature 25 degrees lower than instructions call for. In cookie recipes using eggs and no additional liquid, increase the flour by 2 tablespoons per cup of honey or enough flour to give the desired consistency. Chill before shaping and baking. Helpful Hint: Honey can be measured easily by using the same cup used for measuring the oil in a recipe or by coating a cup or spoon with non-stick vegetable spray.


Good luck and enjoy the party, they get harder as they get older.

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 28857
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Substitutions and/or Additions (Flour/Yeast/Sugar/VWG)
« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2008, 03:11:06 PM »
FRGus723,

Here is the link to the Alton Brown pizza dough recipe:
http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recipes/recipe/0,,FOOD_9936_13823,00.html.

My practice is not to modify a dough recipe for the first time that I plan to use to make pizzas for guests. However, I will try to address your questions as best I can and let you decide what to do. .

First, as to the matter of replacing sugar with honey, one would think that that question would be simple to answer. However, the answers vary quite widely. For example, if you ask a producer and seller of honey, like Suebee, the honey producer mentioned by Pizza_Not_War, the advice is usually to replace sugar with the same amount of honey. However, since honey on average is 1 to 1.5 times sweeter than sugar (it contains high levels of fructose), it makes sense to me to use less honey than sugar. It is also commonly recommended that one substituting honey for sugar in a recipe for the first time replace only half of the sugar with honey, since doing a hundred percent substitution may adversely affect the results. Moreover, since honey is acidic, it is also commonly recommended that a pinch of baking soda be added to the recipe, as also noted by Pizza_Not_War. In your case, if you decide to substitute only one half of the sugar with honey, you may also want to reduce the formula water a bit since honey contains around 17% water. For 2 ĺ t. honey (one half of the amount of sugar), that comes to about 0.12 oz. of water, or around 2/3 t. If you decide to use even less honey, say, 2 t., the amount of water reduction comes to about 1/2 t. Since you are using volume measurements, those amounts may not mean very much, but to be technical, you would reduce the formula water by those amounts.

Second, as to the matter of using semolina flour, I would be very careful, especially if you also plan to use vital wheat gluten. From what I have been able to determine, the Hungarian High Altitude bread flour you plan to use has a protein content of around 12%. Semolina flour can vary quite widely in protein content, depending on the variety, class, environmental conditions, and other factors, however, according to the nutritiondata.com database, semolina flour has a protein content of around 12.8-13%. So, by adding semolina flour to your Hungarian High Altitude flour, you will be raising the protein content of that flour. By how much will depend on how much semolina flour is added. It is usually recommended that one not replace more than 25% of the base flour with semolina flour. Otherwise, the finished crust can be too chewy and leathery. Adding both semolina flour and vital wheat gluten will have the effect of increasing the total protein content of the blended flours even more, depending on the brand and amount of vital wheat gluten you use. If you decide to use semolina flour, I would use it rather sparingly, perhaps below 10%.

Third, as to the matter of vital wheat gluten supplementation, I am aware that vital wheat gluten is sometimes used in high altitude baking. What I donít know is how much is typically recommended in such a situation. When I supplement flours with vital wheat gluten, my practice is to use member Novemberís Mixed Mass Percentage Calculator at http://foodsim.toastguard.com/. If you weigh the flour you use in your recipe (after measuring it out), you should be able to use that tool to determine how much vital wheat gluten to use to achieve a desired targeted protein content.  In your case, you may have to do a couple of calculations if you also decide to also use semolina flour. You will notice that Novemberís calculator lists several brands of vital wheat gluten in the pull-down menu, which may help you in using the calculator. You may discover that you can safely use both semolina flour and vital wheat gluten with your Hungarian High Altitude flour, but I canít tell you how much of those ingredients to use. Since the Alton Brown recipe calls for using bread flour, the protein content of such flour should be around 12-12.7%. Going above that range moves you toward high-gluten flour, of something between bread flour and high-gluten flour.

Whether you use semolina flour, vital wheat gluten, or both, you should reduce the amount of the Hungarian High Altitude flour in the recipe by the amounts of semolina flour and vital wheat gluten used. You may also find that you may have to adjust the hydration used in your recipe, since the addition of semolina flour and vital wheat gluten may yield a drier dough. I might add that when vital wheat gluten is added to a base flour, it is often recommended that the amount of the formula water be increased by one and a half times the weight of the vital wheat gluten.

Finally, as to the matter of how to manage the dough, I note that Alton Brown instructs one to make the dough batch, refrigerate it, and divide it into two dough balls after the dough comes out of the refrigerator. I personally would do the division up front, before the dough goes into the refrigerator. In your case, for four dough batches, that would mean eight dough balls. You should be able to place the eight dough balls on a sheet pan and, after brushing the dough balls with a bit of oil, cover the sheet pan with plastic wrap so that the dough balls are not exposed to the outside air. I would then put the sheet pan with the dough balls into the refrigerator.

Good luck, whatever you chose to do. I hope you will report back on your results.

Peter
« Last Edit: March 14, 2013, 08:34:14 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline FRGus723

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 9
Re: Substitutions and/or Additions (Flour/Yeast/Sugar/VWG)
« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2008, 03:21:11 PM »
See...That is why I love this forum.  Look at that response.  Wow, thank you so much for putting in the time to A. research the issue and B. respond to me.

Since I am sort of new to this I may heed your advice and go with a tried and true pizza dough recipe...

Do you got a simple NY Style recipe to start off with that takes into account 5000 ft  elevation with high mountain desert dryness?  Since I suck at math, volume measurements as well as weight measurements would help.

I promise I will take the advice you gave prior and tinker when others won't be subjected to my potential sugar pizza and post results.

Again, I am very appreciative of your time.

Thanks,
Erik

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 28857
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Substitutions and/or Additions (Flour/Yeast/Sugar/VWG)
« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2008, 04:19:17 PM »
Erik,

For those of us who live at low elevations, it is hard to get a feel for the challenges that people living at high elevations have when making baked goods. Unfortunately, other than member Bill/SFNM, who lives in New Mexico and understands the effects of high altitude baking, we have had very few members report on their results making pizza dough at high elevations. However, one of our (inactive) members, Tim Wurtz, after having several problems developing a workable dough formulation for his pizzeria in Idaho, did manage to come up with a dough formulation that he was happy with, as he reported at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3066.msg26615.html#msg26615 (Reply 24). In that member's case, the pizza crust was of medium thickness. If you'd like, I think I can modify the dough formulation posted there for any number of dough balls, and for a thin/medium thick crust, but I can't tell you how well the recipe will work for you where you are. I know it will work where I live (outside of Dallas) without even trying the recipe.

You might also want to take a look at the following thread where I tried to assist another (inactive) member who, at the time of his post, lived in Colorado: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1186.msg10625.html#msg10625. In that case, the member did not report back on whether he followed the recipes I gave him. So, I have no way of knowing whether the recipes will work where you live. However, the basic recipe is for a thin NY style. I can modify that recipe as well. It is a solid recipe and one with which I have had a great deal of experience. There is also a thread that is devoted to how to prepare and manage the dough made using that basic recipe, at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,2223.msg19563.html#msg19563.

If either of the abovementioned recipes appeals to you to the point where you are willing to give the recipe a shot, I will need to know what size pizzas you plan to make.

Peter

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Offline FRGus723

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 9
Re: Substitutions and/or Additions (Flour/Yeast/Sugar/VWG)
« Reply #5 on: March 07, 2008, 05:00:03 PM »
Ideally I would like to make enough dough for a 16 inch pie so I can cut in half and make two 8 inch pies.  NY Style thin crust.  With a mixer and active yeast as I can't seem to locate instant, only rapid rise yeast.

Thanks again Pete, you're a lifesaver.

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 28857
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Substitutions and/or Additions (Flour/Yeast/Sugar/VWG)
« Reply #6 on: March 07, 2008, 05:04:16 PM »
Erik,

The amount of dough to make one 16" pizza will not make two 8" pizzas. It's not linear like that. So, I assume that you want to make enough dough for eight 8" pizzas. Is that correct?

Peter

Offline FRGus723

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 9
Re: Substitutions and/or Additions (Flour/Yeast/Sugar/VWG)
« Reply #7 on: March 07, 2008, 05:05:24 PM »
I told you I was new to this :-)  Yes that is correct.

Offline November

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1892
  • Location: North America
  • Come for the food. Stay for the science.
    • Uncle Salmon
Re: Substitutions and/or Additions (Flour/Yeast/Sugar/VWG)
« Reply #8 on: March 07, 2008, 05:15:34 PM »
Do you got a simple NY Style recipe to start off with that takes into account 5000 ft  elevation with high mountain desert dryness?

An estimate you could use based on the pressure change at 5000 ft would be 16.8% additional protein.  So if you are working with a recipe that's designed for sea level baking and 12% protein, you would add enough VWG or some other source of wheat protein to increase the total to 14.016%.

Offline November

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1892
  • Location: North America
  • Come for the food. Stay for the science.
    • Uncle Salmon
Re: Substitutions and/or Additions (Flour/Yeast/Sugar/VWG)
« Reply #9 on: March 07, 2008, 05:23:26 PM »
However, since honey on average is 1 to 1.5 times sweeter than sugar (it contains high levels of fructose), it makes sense to me to use less honey than sugar.

Peter,

I often see this logic given, but I don't know if you're taking into consideration that the honey is part water when talking about sweetness.  I know you talk about the water when it comes to overall hydration of the dough.  The way I see it, you can substitute honey for sugar on an equal weight basis because it's only the sugars in the honey that are sweeter than sucrose alone, not the sugars plus the water.  Looking at the data for honey, I can't see where it would be up to 1.5 times sweeter than sucrose.  Honey powder on the other hand I can see.  See the following document and note that they talk about sweetness on a dry weight basis:

http://www.honey.com/downloads/carb.pdf

- red.november

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 28857
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Substitutions and/or Additions (Flour/Yeast/Sugar/VWG)
« Reply #10 on: March 07, 2008, 06:06:27 PM »
Erik,

I used the Lehmann dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/dough_calculator.html to come up with a dough formulation that you should be able to use to make a dough batch from which you should be able to make four 8Ē pizzas. For eight pizzas, you will need to make a second dough batch. As you will note below, I used a thickness factor (TF)--which is a measure of crust thickness--of 0.105, which is quite typical of a NY street style. I also used a bowl residue compensation of 1.5%, which has the effect of increasing of the amounts of all of the ingredients by 1.5% and thereby compensate for minor dough losses in the bowl. I assumed that you will be using ADY instead of IDY. That means that you will have to rehydrate the ADY in a small amount of the formula water, at around 105 degrees F, for about 10-15 minutes before adding it to the rest of the formula water, which can be on the cool side (e.g., tap water temperature if that is what you will be using). For salt, I assumed that you will be using either ordinary table salt or sea salt. The oil can be essentially any oil, including olive oil or vegetable oil.

The dough formulation is as follows:

Flour (100%):
Water (62%):
ADY (0.375%):
Salt (1.75%):
Oil (1%):
Total (165.125%):
Single Ball:
367.9 g  |  12.98 oz | 0.81 lbs
228.1 g  |  8.05 oz | 0.5 lbs
1.38 g | 0.05 oz | 0 lbs | 0.36 tsp | 0.12 tbsp
6.44 g | 0.23 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.15 tsp | 0.38 tbsp
3.68 g | 0.13 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.82 tsp | 0.27 tbsp
607.49 g | 21.43 oz | 1.34 lbs | TF = 0.106575
151.87 g | 5.36 oz | 0.33 lbs
Note: Dough sufficient to make four dough balls for four 8Ē pizzas; bowl residue compensation is 1.5%

If you have a scale, I recommend that you use same to weigh the flour and water. For the rest of the ingredients, you should use the volume measurements noted in the above table (you may have to use your best estimates in measuring out those ingredients with your measuring spoons).

On the assumption that you donít have a scale, I used member Novemberís Mass-Volume Conversion Calculator at http://foodsim.toastguard.com/ to convert the weights of flour and water in the above table to volumes. Since that tool does not include the Hungarian High Altitude bread flour in the pull-down list, I used the Harvest King (Better for Bread) flour as a proxy because that flour is also a bread flour and it also has a protein content of about 12% (itís actually 12% +/- 0.3%). On that basis, 12.98 oz. of flour in the above table converts to 3 cups and 2/3 of a teaspoon. In measuring out the flour, it is important that you follow a very specific sequence of steps. You should start by stirring the flour within the bag to loosen it. You should then lift the flour from the bag into your measuring cup (a 1-cup measuring cup in your case) using a standard kitchen tablespoon. You should fill the measuring cup to the point of overflowing, and then level off the top of the measuring cup with the flat edge of a standard kitchen knife. For the 2/3 t. of additional flour, you should just estimate that quantity using a one-teaspoon measuring spoon.

The water quantity recited in the above table, 8.05 oz., converts to 1 c., plus Ĺ c., plus 2 2/3 t. In measuring out the water, you should view the markings on your measuring cups (I assume you have glass measuring cups for liquids) at eye level on a flat surface.

Volume measurements can rarely approach the accuracy of weights, because no two people measure out volumes exactly the same, so even with the accuracy of the conversion data given above, you may have to make minor adjustments in the mixer bowl. Also, as noted above, I used the Harvest King flour as a proxy. I have no idea whether that is an effective proxy but I would be surprised if the differences are material.

I hope that you succeed with the above dough formulation, and that you will report back to us on your results.

Peter
« Last Edit: March 14, 2013, 07:52:26 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 28857
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Substitutions and/or Additions (Flour/Yeast/Sugar/VWG)
« Reply #11 on: March 07, 2008, 06:21:03 PM »
November,

I saw your intervening posts but posted a dough formulation for Erik to see since he plans to make the dough this evening.

If Erik decides to use vital wheat gluten, and can tell us what brand he has available to use, it should be easy enough to modify the dough formulation to incorporate vital wheat gluten.

You are indeed correct on the honey. When I researched the point, the range of 1-1.5 in the material I read was not related to honey on any basis (dry or wet). Since I was thinking of liquid honey, I took the range to refer to liquid honey. I was actually more concerned about how much of the sugar could safely be replaced with honey without adversely affecting the finished dough (and possible browning effects on the finished crust).

Peter

Offline sourdough girl

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 664
  • Location: Marysville, WA
  • First the bread, NOW the pizza dough!
Re: Substitutions and/or Additions (Flour/Yeast/Sugar/VWG)
« Reply #12 on: March 07, 2008, 06:46:15 PM »
Pete-zza,
Erik says he can find only rapid-rise yeast, not instant.  Isn't rapid-rise what he wants to use for instant, or IDY?  As I recall, there was some discussion after AB's pizza show was on last time because he suggested using a yeast that is difficult for the home pizza maker to find, so didn't we decide that rapid-rise (or bread machine) yeast could be used in place of the instant thereby eliminating the need for the rehydrating step?  You can probably find that thread more quickly than I... and, being "of a certain age" makes it easy to confuse all the different AB shows that have been discussed on many threads!

If I'm off base here, I apologize for muddying the waters, but my curiosity is piqued!

~sd
Never trust a skinny cook!

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 28857
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Substitutions and/or Additions (Flour/Yeast/Sugar/VWG)
« Reply #13 on: March 07, 2008, 07:20:15 PM »
sourdough girl,

I did note Erik's comment about the rapid-rise yeast, which I usually treat as being substitutable for IDY when someone doesn't have IDY, but since I was never satisfied when I researched the matter some time ago that the two forms of yeast were virtually identical, I did not want to suggest to Erik that he use the rapid-rise yeast in a high elevation environment where it is common to use less yeast. The yeast sold in supermarkets that is actually IDY is the bread machine yeast. However, since Erik said that he was planning to use ADY, it was simple enough to provide a dough formulation using that yeast. Under the circumstances, I just felt more comfortable going with the ADY than the rapid-rise yeast.

Peter

Offline FRGus723

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 9
Re: Substitutions and/or Additions (Flour/Yeast/Sugar/VWG)
« Reply #14 on: March 08, 2008, 12:45:25 AM »
Thank you all so much for all the helpful advice.  I used Pete-zza's formula above and gave her a shot.  All your assumptions were correct, I do have a Soehlne scale, I did use Active, I passed on but do have Bob's VWG 75-80% protein.

One question I have is so many recipes I see using stand blenders say to knead for 15 minutes on speed 2 with dough hook, where I thought Lehmann's logic was the fewer the better, maybe 2-3 minutes with a stand mixer.

still confused

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 28857
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Substitutions and/or Additions (Flour/Yeast/Sugar/VWG)
« Reply #15 on: March 08, 2008, 09:58:33 AM »
Erik,

I know that there are some people who try to keep their kneading down to an absolute minimum, but in most cases two or three minutes of kneading will not be enough, even for a small amount of dough. If you are looking for a test of how much to knead a dough, you may want to take a look at this post: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3560.msg30582/topicseen.html#msg30582 (Reply 7). To see the test in action, but in a commercial mixer environment, you may also want to take a look at the video at http://www.pizzatube.com/view_video.php?viewkey=086079795c442636b55f&page=&viewtype=&category=.

If you have the Bob's Red Mill vital wheat gluten, the original 12.98 oz. of flour (the Hungarian High Altitude bread flour) would become about 12.57 ounces of that flour and 0.42 oz. of the Bob's Red Mill vital wheat gluten. Using Bob's Red Mill nutrition data, the 0.42 oz. of vital wheat gluten would translate to about 4 3/4 t. Since you indicated that you have a Soehnle scale, you should, of course, use that scale to weigh the flour and water. Technically, you should increase the formula water to reflect the addition of the vital wheat gluten. In this case, it would be about one tablespoon and 1/2 teaspoon of water. However, what I would do is hold back that water and add it only if the dough looks like it needs it.

Peter
« Last Edit: March 08, 2008, 10:25:10 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 28857
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Substitutions and/or Additions (Flour/Yeast/Sugar/VWG)
« Reply #16 on: March 08, 2008, 10:55:34 AM »
Further to sourdough girl's comment earlier, I found this FAQ section at the Fleishchmann's website at http://www.breadworld.com/FAQ.aspx. The explanations on the RapidRise and Bread Machine yeast are not as exact as I would like, but I interpret the explanations as saying that the RapidRise and Bread Machine yeast are not identical strains. That is consistent with what I was once told by a Fleischmann's customer service rep, but only after I pressed her on this point through several email exchanges.

It will also be noted that the FAQ's cover high-altitude baking.

Peter

Offline sourdough girl

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 664
  • Location: Marysville, WA
  • First the bread, NOW the pizza dough!
Re: Substitutions and/or Additions (Flour/Yeast/Sugar/VWG)
« Reply #17 on: March 08, 2008, 04:04:36 PM »
Peter,
Thanks for your further research.  As I have said in other threads, the most confusing part of making pizza, for me, is the yeast... and the differences between them.

That confusion is exacerbated by answers like this one on the Fleischmann's webpage:

"What is the difference between Instant Yeast, Bread Machine Yeast and RapidRise Yeast?
Mainly names, but these are all the same yeast! Use interchangeably "

"Mainly" names?  If they are all the same yeast, it should be "only" names...  sounds like weasel words to me, especially since my jar of Fleishmann's Bread Machine Yeast says "also ideal for all RapidRise Recipes" (underline theirs) and then gives DIFFERENT directions for use of each!  That means, to me, that they can't be used "interchangeably" and is therefore misleading.  Having worked in the grocery industry for many years, I understand the shelf strategies used in marketing products, including different names for the same product in order to capture a bigger market share by appealing to different shoppers, but since the same company markets "Bread Machine" and "RapidRise" and DOESN'T market "instant" (at least not on the grocery shelf) that just adds to the confusion. 

Thanks for trying to shed some light on this topic... it is appreciated!

~sd
Never trust a skinny cook!

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 28857
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Substitutions and/or Additions (Flour/Yeast/Sugar/VWG)
« Reply #18 on: March 08, 2008, 04:39:57 PM »
sourdough girl,

I reacted the same way to the "Mainly" characterization. Another interesting observation is that Fleishchmann's provides several pages of pizza and calzone recipes, starting at http://www.breadworld.com/RecipeSearch.aspx?cat=Pizzas%20and%20Calzones&query=, and, to the best of my knowledge from scanning them there is not a single recipe that uses cold fermentation. And most of the recipes require using a full packet or a couple of teaspoons of their RapidRise or Bread Machine yeast to make dough for about two 12" pizzas. It's clear that Fleischmann's does not want to market to home bakers the same way they market to professionals. I don't think they want home bakers to know that they can buy a full pound of ADY or IDY for not much more than the price of a three-packet strip at the local supermarket.

What I have found helpful in doing yeast conversions is the table at http://www.theartisan.net/convert_yeast_two.htm. In some cases, one has to extrapolate values but that can be done quite easily by using a basic calculator.

Peter
« Last Edit: March 08, 2008, 04:50:06 PM by Pete-zza »

A D V E R T I S E M E N T