A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Author Topic: visit to Uno Pizza Napoletnana  (Read 6214 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Tom Grim

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 32
  • I Love Pizza!
visit to Uno Pizza Napoletnana
« on: February 24, 2005, 03:49:58 PM »
    This place is special.  I don't say that about many pizzarias. 
     I bought Ed Levin's book (Slice of Heavan) last week, and he raved about this place, so I had to try it while in NY.  I called to find out when they were open and the message said they were "open at 5 until the fresh dough runs out"  They are only open Thurs, Fri, Sat, Sun.  No reservations taken.
    This place has just relocated from New Jersy to the lower east side of Manhattan.   It is small with about 8 tables in the front with a wood burning oven in the rear.  The oven was visible from the dining area.
     Ony two people work there, the pizza maker(the owner) and the waiter.  There is a sign on the wall that says "Great pizza is our specialty, not great service"   The menu is minimal.  Four pizzas offered, two wines, two italian beers.  Thats it.  No toppings, no salads, nothing else but four pizzas.  One pizza with just sauce, one with sauce and motz, one with Buffalo motz and cherry tomatotes and one with just motz.  Thats it.  No choice between big and small, one size fits all.  They are about 12 inches.  Each pizza cost $16.50
    I watched him make several of the pizzas.  He doesn't pick up the dough to stretch it, rather he pats it on the table until it becomes round, flips it over and pats it some more.  He then put some what appeared to be garlic and salt on the crust, and then a litte sauce, that looked uncooked.  He then put loose chunks of motz on the sauce and then several whole basil leaves.  The last thing he did was add a generous amount of olive oil and into the oven it went.
      My wife, who loves food, but didn't want to go for pizza was raving about it.  It is the most unusual pizza i have ever had.  It was light, subtle, delicate.  This is the first time that I had buffalo motz, and it was incredible.   
     The crust had a wonderful smoky taste.  It was thin, but not crisp. I ususally prefer crispy crusts.  The crust was soft and kind of light.  It sort of melts in your mouth. It was nicely cooked with a few burned places, but not as burned as I usually like it. My wife doesn't like burned crust so it was a good compromise
      We both were delighted at how good this pizza was.  We had ordered two different pizzas and finished them off.  We decided to order the third pizza on the  menu.  It took a while because there is only one pizza maker. the owner.
     I talked to the owner for a bit. He is young, maybe 30, maybe.  I asked him the temp of his oven, and he said he thought it was about 900 degrees.  He told me that he and his father built a brick oven when he was a kid. 
     I asked him how many pizzas he makes a night and he said he wasn't sure, but at least 100.  I asked him how he learned to make pizzas and he replied that his whole family is Italian.  He said things were going well in the new location but it was a lot of work.
       This pizza has me rethinking how pizza should taste.  It is so diferent than any pizza than I have ever had.  Light, delicious, subtle, flavorful.  It would take more of a writer to descripe it.  If you love pizza, you need to get there and try it.  It might change your life.
Tom
       

Online Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 27488
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: visit to Uno Pizza Napoletnana
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2005, 04:23:01 PM »
Tom,

Were you able to get any idea from Mangieri, the owner of Una Pizza Napoletana, of how the dough is made? I was told recently by the NY area distributor of the Caputo 00 flour that Mangieri is one of his customers, and that Mangieri makes the dough entirely by hand, starting at 1 AM. He uses pieces of old dough to make the new dough. That labor intensity, and high rent, help to explain the high cost of the pizzas.

I have read that the crust is extremely tasty, reflecting the fact that the dough goes through two rises, one for around 24 hours and another for around 12 hours, entirely at room temperature, which may be the reason why Una Pizza can run out of dough from time to time. The long fermentation period should produce a lot of fermentation by-products and crust flavor. Did the crust flavor stand out with the pizzas you tried, beyond the smokiness you mentioned? With the dough at room temperature of around 36 hours, I would think that the flavor would have a kind of a sourdough aspect to it.

Peter


Offline bigpix

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 32
Re: visit to Uno Pizza Napoletnana
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2005, 01:37:15 AM »
What is the address for this wonderful place?

Offline Tom Grim

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 32
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: visit to Uno Pizza Napoletnana
« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2005, 11:04:20 AM »
     If my memory serves me correctly, Uno Pizza is on 12th between 1st and 2nd ave in the East Village.  It  is small and easy to miss.
     I didn't ask him about the flour, but I guessed that it was 00 due to the semi-softness of the crust.  He is a very nice guy, and I bet he would share if asked. I asked him how much the dough balls weighed and he said he didn't weigh them, but he guessed they were between 8 & 10 ounces.  He keeps his dough in a big plastic box with a lid.  The looked breast like, fully raised.  He was busy, and  I didn't want to keep him from his pizzas.
    The dough was very good, flavorful, but was not sourdough-ish.  I don't care for sourdough, so I would have noticed.
     You need to go there and try it if you can.  I would love to hear other opinions.
Tom 

Offline Janran

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: visit to Uno Pizza Napoletnana
« Reply #4 on: March 27, 2005, 09:42:28 AM »
I was very disappointed.  I was there in January.  Although the pizza looked great, the charred crust was soft and raw tasting on the interior.  I've eaten pizza in Naples, so I think I'm able to compare it to the real thing--and this wasn't it for me.  I'm looking for a pizza restaurant to go to in a couple of weeks for by b'day with about 8 friends.  I'm thinking of Otto Enoteca (Mario Battali's place).  Any opinions?

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Online Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 27488
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: visit to Uno Pizza Napoletnana
« Reply #5 on: March 27, 2005, 11:20:56 AM »
Janran,

Welcome to the forum.

I have only read about Otto's but it seems from the reviews that the pizza made there is more Roman style than Neapolitan. The pizzas are cooked on some sort of griddle arrangement rather than in a wood-fired oven, and the skins are apparently formed using some sort of sheeting equipment. You might get some insights by going to the Otto website at http://www.ottopizzeria.com/pizzeria.html. You might also want to check the eGullet (http://forums.egullet.org/index.php) and chowhound (http://www.chowhound.com/main.html) forum websites and do searches there to see what the reviewers on those forums have to say.

Peter
« Last Edit: March 27, 2005, 11:28:32 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline Arthur

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 253
  • When Brooklyn Was the World
Re: visit to Uno Pizza Napoletnana
« Reply #6 on: March 28, 2005, 09:07:10 AM »
That's funny that you didn't taste the sourdough.  There are 2 distinct flavors in my opinion - salt and sourdough.  The sourdough is subtle, but it's there.  The salt - well the salt is heavy because he puts some on top in addition to (adding it to) the dough.  The cooked dough is soft - softer than Pasty's - Pasty's is softer than totonnos and john's.   

It's funny how the more pizza places you visit the more specific you can get about pizza...
i.e., I like the salt and artisan quality from Uno.
I like watching the artist at di fara
I like the sauce at pasty's.
I like the square at L&B's (and the atmosphere :) )
I like the dough at totonnos
....

Patsy's is a business.  John's is a business.  UPN and Di Fara's are for the love of pizza.  There's a difference.  You may not like UPN or Di Fara's (in my case Di Fara's is not to my tasting) but I have great respect for those places.  Although with UPN charging $17 a pie, they do a good business ;)

« Last Edit: March 28, 2005, 09:13:17 AM by Arthur »

Online scott r

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3309
  • Age: 47
  • Location: boston
  • I Love Pizzafreaks!
Re: visit to Uno Pizza Napoletnana
« Reply #7 on: July 29, 2005, 04:33:03 AM »
I was just looking at these older posts and saw a few things that I wanted to comment on.   I found Anthony's dough to be really sour just like peter suspected.  It was very pleasant, though, and not overly sharp.   The flavor of these pies was the best I have ever had, but I will be in Naples in a few weeks so I can't wait to compare.  I got four pies while I was there, and had at a taste of each of them.  None of these pies were at all raw on the interior, in fact each was cooked perfectly.

Offline ciro

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 8
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: visit to Uno Pizza Napoletnana
« Reply #8 on: November 17, 2005, 08:39:08 PM »
I went to UPN hoping to be blown away. What I found was a good pizza, nothing more. The flavors seem bland. The dough did not speak to me, usuall every little bubble  of a neapolitan crust holds flavour. IT lacked a smokey signature, and the sauce also seemed under seasoned. I have eaten pizza from Naples all my life, something is missing at UPN.

Ciro

Offline David

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 966
  • What’s So Funny ‘Bout Pizza Love and Understanding
Re: visit to Uno Pizza Napoletnana
« Reply #9 on: November 18, 2005, 08:24:34 AM »
IT lacked a smokey signature, and the sauce also seemed under seasoned. I have eaten pizza from Naples all my life, something is missing at UPN.

Ciro

That's interesting that you found the sauce under seasoned.I have always felt that the salt was a bit too prominent for my taste.The Basil and Olive oil were fine to me.
Ed Levine stated at the New York Pizza Show that he surmised  "That the one thing he thought UPN had added to the US Artisan Pizza movement was the salt - the sea salt he used".That seemed somewhat of an odd and uninspiring statement to me?I came away thinking that for  someone who had just surveyed and commented on the whole US Pizza market,that was either lame comment or maybe a Diplomatic way of confirming my own thoughts.I have my own mixed opinions about UPN,and one is that the guy is trying harder than anyone else that I've visited in the US to create an authentic Neapolitan Pizza.It may not be the greatest Pizza ever,as the hype surrounding it (and probably led to you slight dissapointment Ciro ) would have you believe,but the guy has at the very least "Raised the bar" here,which IMO is a lot more defining than the type / amount of salt he is using.I look forward to your comments on visits elsewhere Ciro.Regards,
                                                                                                                  David
« Last Edit: November 18, 2005, 09:03:02 AM by David »
If you're looking for a date... go to the Supermarket.If you're looking for a wife....go to the Farmers market

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Offline pizzanapoletana

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 984
  • Location: London -UK
  • Pizza Napoletana as it was made in 1730!
    • Forno Napoletano - Pizza Ovens
Re: visit to Uno Pizza Napoletnana
« Reply #10 on: November 18, 2005, 11:23:26 AM »
Davis,

I had my worst pizza ever when visiting "Ed's best pizzeria in Naples" last week at L'Europeo, near Piazza Borsa.

This, together with the discussion I had with him last year, confirms that he was not the best person to talk about neapolitan pizza, has he has not any idea about the things to look at in a Quality Pizza Napoletana (Light, Soft, melt in the mouth, crust flavour, superior tomato, fresh mozzarella di Bufala or fior di latte dell'appennino meridionale...)

Ciao

Offline David

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 966
  • What’s So Funny ‘Bout Pizza Love and Understanding
Re: visit to Uno Pizza Napoletnana
« Reply #11 on: November 18, 2005, 11:46:37 AM »
Well I think I'm right in saying that as an invited speaker to the Pizza Expo,he is regarded as somewhat of a recognized "Authority" on Pizza here in the US and therefore his opinion is respected (and accepted unquestionably ) by many.Just as a Food writer in a Daily newspaper,comments and Reviews by these people can carry a lot of weight and can often influence the success / failure of a new business,especially in the highly competitive media driven New York restaurant scene.The success of Zagats ,its ratings and (independent) reviews are revered here and eagerly awaited-IMO just proving how much weight is carried by the written word.Right or wrong ,I guarantee that many will read his book, go to Naples, seek out L'Europeo and agree with the author on his opinion,
                                                                                                 David
If you're looking for a date... go to the Supermarket.If you're looking for a wife....go to the Farmers market

Offline Explorer

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: visit to Uno Pizza Napoletnana
« Reply #12 on: December 11, 2005, 02:50:16 PM »
Ciro- I visited UPN a month ago in early November, and I was very disapointed vs. the real one in Naples- which I have been to and visited several of them. At UPN, although it is the closest you might get to a Napoletan pizza, there's something screwed-up in it- definitely too raw (he doesn't stretch it enough); and the tomato sauce is a joke.

Pizzanapoletana- I was at L'Europeo exactly this year in January, and it wasn't the best pizza at all. The owner (forgot his name) is big on show and tell, and less on delivery. Have you tried Pizza Starita (capodimonte) or Trianon? I spent 5 days in Naples, just going to Pizzerias- perhaps we did 14 of them!

Online Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 27488
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: visit to Uno Pizza Napoletnana
« Reply #13 on: September 24, 2006, 12:48:12 PM »
During a recent visit to NYC I had an opportunity to visit Una Pizza Napoletana and to meet and speak with Anthony Mangieri about his pizzas. I arrived at UPN on a Saturday night, at around 6:30 PM, just before a line started to form outside of the pizzeria. As noted previously by Tom Grim, the pizzeria is fairly small, with about 36 seats. Since no reservations are taken, it pays to get to the pizzeria early.

As is my practice when trying out a new pizzeria, I ordered the DOC Pizza Margherita (with the bufala di mozzarella cheese). I agree with everything that Tom Grim said about Anthony’s pizzas. I found the Margherita pizza to be of exceptional quality. The sauce was tangy, the bufala soft and delicate, and the crust was soft and chewy with a decent amount of charring. When I commented to Anthony on the small amount of sauce he uses on his pizzas, which some people have criticized, he said that he was trying to strike a balance for the pizza where no single ingredient overtakes any other.

There’s not much to be added to what is already known about Anthony’s dough. He uses the Caputo 00 Pizzeria flour and a combination of a locally-generated preferment and old dough as a leavening agent. A typical dough ball weight is around 10 ounces which, for a roughly 12” pie, translates to a thickness factor of about 0.088. Anthony appears to deal with sources for his ingredients other than standard foodservice companies. Hence, it will be difficult to determine the brands of tomatoes, cheese, and olive oil (it is Sicilian) and find them in the usual marketplace. I don’t blame Anthony if he prefers to keep these brands secret. There’s really not that much of a competitive advantage in what he is doing.

There has been some criticism of the high prices of Anthony’s pizzas. That doesn’t bother me personally but I can understand that it would be costly to feed an entire family. I also realize that NYC is a high-cost city, and that Anthony is using very high quality ingredients, almost all of them imported. The importer of the Caputo flour also once told me that Anthony is in a high-rent section of the city. With a glass of wine, my tab was less than what I would have spent on another type of meal elsewhere. I will certainly make return visits to UPN when I am in NYC.

I invited Anthony to join the forum. Alas, that is highly unlikely. He doesn’t own a computer and doesn’t know how to operate one.

Peter

A D V E R T I S E M E N T