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Author Topic: Press pizza  (Read 485 times)

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Offline LasTuk

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Press pizza
« on: September 26, 2017, 04:16:13 AM »
Is there a press (cold) for thick pizzas (like Neapolitan or American)? All that I look at - makes only thin (Italian) crust.

Offline vtsteve

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Re: Press pizza
« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2017, 08:33:49 AM »
I saw your post in the other thread - dough presses are *not* the way to make a top-quality pizza.
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Offline LasTuk

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Re: Press pizza
« Reply #2 on: September 26, 2017, 09:33:44 AM »
I saw your post in the other thread - dough presses are *not* the way to make a top-quality pizza.
why?

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Press pizza
« Reply #3 on: September 26, 2017, 12:56:01 PM »
Presses create a cell structure that is more like that of bread than pizza which is open and porous, especially true with New York style pizzas. The porosity of the crumb structure has a significant influence on the mastication and crispiness characteristics of the finished crust. Yes, it is possible to achieve a more open crumb structure using a press but it is achieved by allowing the pressed skin time to proof/rise after pressing (much like we proof bread prior to baking), for that reason pressed dough skins are wither pressed on an oiled pan (cold press) or placed onto an oiled pan (hot press) for proofing. There are some applications where presses are employed successfully such as in the fast casual concept and in making thick crust and pan style pizzas (the thick crust and pan style pizzas are allowed to proof for 45 to 70-minutes after pressing to achieve the desired finished crust height and crumb structure characteristics.. If you want to see what a cold press crust looks like just go to your local supermarket and buy a couple of frozen pizzas such as Tombstone and turn them over, if you see a series og concentric circles pressed into the bottom of the crust you are looking at a cold pressed crust, for a hot pressed crust look for Home Run Inn or even Digiorno's as they are formed using a hot press.
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Offline nick57

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Re: Press pizza
« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2017, 12:22:55 PM »
 Sam's uses a pizza press on their pies. The crust is dense and has a bread like texture. I have had a few slices, nothing to write home about. It was very unsatisfying. I've had better frozen pies. I would stay away from a press if you are looking to make a quality pizza that makes your customers want to come back again and again.

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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Press pizza
« Reply #5 on: October 03, 2017, 02:34:29 PM »
Is there a press (cold) for thick pizzas (like Neapolitan or American)? All that I look at - makes only thin (Italian) crust.

Neapolitan is pretty much as thin as it gets.
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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Press pizza
« Reply #6 on: October 03, 2017, 02:39:34 PM »
I saw your post in the other thread - dough presses are *not* the way to make a top-quality pizza.

While I generally agree with this statement, I wouldn't go so far as to say that you can't necessarily make a pizza that is very good to great relative to the situation. Do you want to compete on NP next door to to Motorino using a dough press? Probably not, but how about where the competition really sucks? I'd say the latter represents a pretty large opportunity.

Perhaps with a press like this that leaves a cornicione at least somewhat in tact.

« Last Edit: October 03, 2017, 02:41:53 PM by TXCraig1 »
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
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Online jsaras

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Re: Press pizza
« Reply #7 on: October 03, 2017, 04:54:50 PM »
As if that guy needs a machine to do it
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Offline jkb

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Re: Press pizza
« Reply #8 on: October 03, 2017, 09:39:12 PM »
I'm so glad I bothered to get the headphones out before I started that video.  :-D

Offline nick57

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Re: Press pizza
« Reply #9 on: October 06, 2017, 08:08:53 PM »
That press makes a pretty good looking skin.

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Offline Giggliato

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Re: Press pizza
« Reply #10 on: October 15, 2017, 01:05:20 PM »
Yeah that press looks allright, Does it use less pressure than the standard ones?

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