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Author Topic: gluten free pizza - I have achieved the Holy Grail!!  (Read 192 times)

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Offline canadave

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gluten free pizza - I have achieved the Holy Grail!!
« on: October 03, 2017, 10:48:42 AM »
Some background first. For a long time, I've been trying to recreate the most delicious gluten-free pizza I've ever had: namely, that of Keste Pizza in New York City. All I knew for sure is that they used FioreGlut gluten free flour. I tried lots of different recipes, oven temps, etc., and wound up with efforts that were pretty good, tasty enough, but not quite at "perfection".  Well, that has all changed! And who knew the solution would be so simple.

My big mistake (a really stupid one, in retrospect) was assuming Keste would use a recipe that was altered from the very basic one that is printed on the FioreGlut bag itself. That basic recipe just has flour, water, yeast, oil, and salt. I figured there was no way that Keste would go with that, and besides, the Keste pizzas I've tasted were so delicious, so flavourful, I figured it had to have something else in it. So I did lots of experimenting, with only limited success as I mentioned.

But with some inside info, with the help of this forum, I have finally achieved perfection--the perfect, delicious, ultimate gluten free pizza, that tastes exactly like Keste!

Here's the recipe and the secret:

1,000 grams (entire bag) of FioreGlut gluten free flour
800 grams warm water
9 grams yeast
25 grams salt
20 grams olive oil

I mixed everything together in my DLX stand mixer. It didn't want to mix at first--just formed a blob that wouldn't mix together. I coaxed it with my hands, which caused a lot of the blob to glom onto my fingers--it's quite sticky--but I finally got it to start mixing together. Once it mixed for about 4 minutes, I covered the bowl and let it rise in a warm place for an hour. The big dough ball almost doubled in size.

While it was rising, I preheat my 1/2" thick steel plate in my oven, on lowest rack. Now here's the other crucial trick--my oven goes to 550 degrees, but I was able to get it another 35 degrees hotter by calibrating the oven higher. That got me to 585 degrees. I can't guarantee this "Holy Grail" recipe will turn out quite so delicious if you don't have a steel plate and an oven that goes up to 585 after calibration.

Anyway, once the dough was risen and oven preheated, I turned the big dough ball out onto my kitchen countertop, well-dusted with GF flour, and divided into four smaller balls (I may be able to get five balls rather than four--will try that next time). I put three in the fridge and started prepping the fourth ball for baking.

The dough was VERY soft and supple, easy to shape, but very sticky due to the high hydration content. I oiled my hands, which helped, and also it helped having the countertop dusted with flour. I was able to gently shape it with my fingers on the dusted pizza peel, but had to pat it down gently in places because it slightly tore in spots as it got more stretched. I finally used a rolling pin, GENTLY, for the last bit of stretching.

After that it was just a matter of topping it with sauce and cheese, drizzling with olive oil, and putting some slightly moistened basil leaves on top. Then into the oven. I switched the oven to broil just after putting it in, to try to get the cheese melting and bottom charring to happen at the same time.

Within about 3 minutes of going into the oven, it was all done!!  And oh my god...it was perfection. Good charring on bottom, soft and chewy inside, slight crisp to the crust outside.  And an incredible taste that was just like Keste; it was indistinguishable from, and I would venture to say perhaps even better than, regular gluten pizza. Let's put it this way--if you didn't tell anyone it was a gluten free pizza, no one would have any way of knowing it was gluten free.

I don't have pictures right now, but will try to do a photo shoot next time I make it.

If you're fiending for gluten free pizza that tastes even better than the real thing, and have access to FioreGlut flour, a hot oven, and a steel plate, your prayers are answered.

« Last Edit: October 03, 2017, 11:38:56 AM by canadave »

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: gluten free pizza - I have achieved the Holy Grail!!
« Reply #1 on: October 03, 2017, 11:30:30 AM »
Thanks for this. One question, when you say "easy to stretch" do you mean easy to shape? I've used Fiore Glut a number of times, and in my hands, the dough has almost no shear strength - it will tear under even slight attempts to stretch it. For me, opening the ball is a matter of shaping not stretching.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
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Offline canadave

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Re: gluten free pizza - I have achieved the Holy Grail!!
« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2017, 11:38:30 AM »
Thanks for this. One question, when you say "easy to stretch" do you mean easy to shape? I've used Fiore Glut a number of times, and in my hands, the dough has almost no shear strength - it will tear under even slight attempts to stretch it. For me, opening the ball is a matter of shaping not stretching.
Sorry--yes, I suppose "shape" would be a better and more precise word than "stretch". I basically place the dough ball on the floured peel and then just hand-shape it into a disc and gently use my fingers to shape it into an ever-larger disc.

I'll update my post.

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