A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Author Topic: What causes this?  (Read 528 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline bakersquality

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 10
  • I bleed pizza sauce
What causes this?
« on: March 16, 2017, 01:44:39 PM »
I've only come across this a couple times and I can't seem to nail down the cause. If I had to guess, to me it seems like too much dead yeast releasing glutathione and causing the dough to become rubbery and gummy. The only thing that's throwing me is that If I make two crusts from the same batch, one thinner and one thicker, only the thin one will come out looking like this and the thick one is just fine. Any thoughts?

A quick note... These are mixed, not proofed, sheeted and sent through a cryogenic freezer before packaging.
« Last Edit: March 16, 2017, 01:46:31 PM by bakersquality »

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
  • Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 2926
  • Location: Manhattan, KS
    • Dough Doctor
Re: What causes this?
« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2017, 06:08:23 PM »
With such a small portion of the crust shown it is hard to say for sure, but from what I see it appears that the crust (par-baked) is not fully baked. Par-baked crust is fully baked to set the structure but not enough to create significant browning on it. If you can send me a couple more photos showing the entire top and bottom of the crust I might be able be a bit more specific.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline bakersquality

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 10
  • I bleed pizza sauce
Re: What causes this?
« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2017, 10:03:44 AM »
I wish I had more pictures of this... I had taken this a while back and it's been sitting on my computer for a while. This is the bottom of a topped and cooked pizza. It was never parbaked. The crust was taken out of the freezer, thawed in a bag, formed into a high-walled pan and proofed on a bakery cart with a cover on it ambient temps of about 85 degrees for 3 hours. Then cooked in an old Fish rotating oven at 485 for about 16-17 minutes.

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
  • Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 2926
  • Location: Manhattan, KS
    • Dough Doctor
Re: What causes this?
« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2017, 08:12:58 PM »
It still looks under baked to me. Are you using any oil or shortening in the pan? Is your pan dark colored? A Fish oven can have one of three different deck surfaces, open grid, composite, steel. Which deck surface do you have on your shelves?
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline bakersquality

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 10
  • I bleed pizza sauce
Re: What causes this?
« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2017, 09:02:00 AM »
I used just a very little amount of soybean oil to coat the pan. The pan is not dark colored and the oven has steel decks.

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
  • Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 2926
  • Location: Manhattan, KS
    • Dough Doctor
Re: What causes this?
« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2017, 12:28:17 PM »
A dark colored pan will reflect heat away from it providing a somewhat poorer quality of bake to the crust in any given amount of time as compared to a dark colored pan. You might want to replace the pan with one having a dark colored anodized finish or you can also season the outside of your existing pan to achieve a darker color. You might also try using a little more oil in the pan too. The function of the oil is to breach any gaps between the dough and the bottom of the pan during the baking process which helps the crust to bake better and in many cases also provides for a crispier finished crust.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline bakersquality

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 10
  • I bleed pizza sauce
Re: What causes this?
« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2017, 12:30:27 PM »
Interesting, I didn't know that about the differences in pans! I will look into that.

Offline TXCraig1

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 21355
  • Location: Houston, TX
  • Pizza is not bread.
    • Craig's Neapolitan Garage
Re: What causes this?
« Reply #7 on: March 21, 2017, 12:33:37 PM »
A dark colored (I think Tom intended to write "shiny") pan will reflect heat away from it providing a somewhat poorer quality of bake to the crust in any given amount of time as compared to a dark colored pan. You might want to replace the pan with one having a dark colored anodized finish or you can also season the outside of your existing pan to achieve a darker color. You might also try using a little more oil in the pan too. The function of the oil is to breach any gaps between the dough and the bottom of the pan during the baking process which helps the crust to bake better and in many cases also provides for a crispier finished crust.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline bakersquality

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 10
  • I bleed pizza sauce
Re: What causes this?
« Reply #8 on: March 21, 2017, 12:34:45 PM »
Yeah, I figured that's what he had meant when he wrote it. Thanks

Offline TXCraig1

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 21355
  • Location: Houston, TX
  • Pizza is not bread.
    • Craig's Neapolitan Garage
Re: What causes this?
« Reply #9 on: March 21, 2017, 12:43:38 PM »
You might also try using a little more oil in the pan too. The function of the oil is to breach any gaps between the dough and the bottom of the pan during the baking process which helps the crust to bake better and in many cases also provides for a crispier finished crust.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Tom,

I've noticed somewhat the opposite with my Detroit, NY squares, and bar-style pizza. The less oil I use, the better the crust. I've attributed the difference to the fact that oil is a lousy conductor of heat.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Offline csnack

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 220
  • Location: Seattle
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: What causes this?
« Reply #10 on: March 21, 2017, 02:10:23 PM »
Tom,

I've noticed somewhat the opposite with my Detroit, NY squares, and bar-style pizza. The less oil I use, the better the crust. I've attributed the difference to the fact that oil is a lousy conductor of heat.
I've experienced the same thing with my pan pizzas. I use butter flavored crisco, but the less of it I use the better browning I get on the bottom crust. Once I put 4 oz of the crisco in the pan (gross) like the PH clone does and got really poor brown to blonde ratio. Even with the amount I was regularly using (approx 2.5 oz) I got better but still inadequate browning. When I tried smearing the crisco lightly around the pan I finally got a proper even browning across the bottom, which I now get consistently the less I use.

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
  • Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 2926
  • Location: Manhattan, KS
    • Dough Doctor
Re: What causes this?
« Reply #11 on: March 21, 2017, 02:29:28 PM »
Craig;
Aside from the obvious, the oil is used mostly to bridge any air gap between the dough and the pan surface where in that case the oil conducts heat much better than air which in turn results in a more evenly browned crust, additionally, if you have enough oil in the pan you can also achieve a fried effect upon the crust which increases the crispiness of the crust, but in this application oil works much better than shortening.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


 

A D V E R T I S E M E N T