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Author Topic: I got a pizza stone, now what?  (Read 187 times)

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Offline mileniarista

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I got a pizza stone, now what?
« on: January 13, 2018, 08:41:52 AM »
Hi, a complete pizza noob here! I started experimenting with the pizza stone I was gifted this Christmas and I'm looking for some advice. I'm probably doing so many things the wrong way that I'm not sure what to ask or what to aim for; I'll just describe my process the best way I can:

I've used the stone three times in my kitchen oven so far. I preheat it for 45 min in the middle shelf (250C regular heating, up and down) plus an extra 10 min only with the broiler. Switch back to regular heating and place the pizza directly on the stone for 3 min without toppings, only tomato sauce. Then I take it out, quickly assemble all the toppings and put it back in for another 3-4 min.

This is my dough recipe, cold fermented for 3 days with 2 or 3 re-ballings:

100% regular wheat flour (9% protein)
58% hydration
5% olive oil
2% salt
0,4% active dry yeast

I shape a 200g ball by hand into a thin disc (3-4 mm) with a 1 cm rim. The bottom of the pizza cooks evenly and stays crispy, although I don't get any "leoparding" besides some black spots on the rim, and I don't get anything near the chewiness of a neapolitan style pizza, actually kind of the opposite. Good flavor though. For the cheese I use a mix of fresh mozzarella that I dry in the fridge for a couple of days and grated mozzarella. I found that the fresh one boils before the crust is cooked if I don't use this two step baking trick.

I'm open to any kind of advice that can improve my pizzas. I wouldn't mind trying other styles of pizza if they are more appropriate for the equipment that I have, since I don't see myself getting a wood fired oven in the near future... although who knows...

Offline yarbrough462

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Re: I got a pizza stone, now what?
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2018, 08:46:09 AM »
Hi, a complete pizza noob here! I started experimenting with the pizza stone I was gifted this Christmas and I'm looking for some advice. I'm probably doing so many things the wrong way that I'm not sure what to ask or what to aim for; I'll just describe my process the best way I can:

I've used the stone three times in my kitchen oven so far. I preheat it for 45 min in the middle shelf (250C regular heating, up and down) plus an extra 10 min only with the broiler. Switch back to regular heating and place the pizza directly on the stone for 3 min without toppings, only tomato sauce. Then I take it out, quickly assemble all the toppings and put it back in for another 3-4 min.

This is my dough recipe, cold fermented for 3 days with 2 or 3 re-ballings:

100% regular wheat flour (9% protein)
58% hydration
5% olive oil
2% salt
0,4% active dry yeast

I shape a 200g ball by hand into a thin disc (3-4 mm) with a 1 cm rim. The bottom of the pizza cooks evenly and stays crispy, although I don't get any "leoparding" besides some black spots on the rim, and I don't get anything near the chewiness of a neapolitan style pizza, actually kind of the opposite. Good flavor though. For the cheese I use a mix of fresh mozzarella that I dry in the fridge for a couple of days and grated mozzarella. I found that the fresh one boils before the crust is cooked if I don't use this two step baking trick.

I'm open to any kind of advice that can improve my pizzas. I wouldn't mind trying other styles of pizza if they are more appropriate for the equipment that I have, since I don't see myself getting a wood fired oven in the near future... although who knows...

With your equipment, you would be be much better off trying a New York style pie.  You can't cook Neapolitan pizza in a home oven.  Try this recipe:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/lehmann-nystyle.php

Online Dangerous Salumi

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Re: I got a pizza stone, now what?
« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2018, 09:08:10 AM »
250C is 480 F. Thats pretty low for NY style. You really need 500-550F

Start with a 60% hydration dough. You should have around 14% protein flour. That along with good kneading will increase your chewiness. See how it works on your stone and broiler method.

Im not a fan of moving the pizza all around and using the broiler. Some others think its great.

You could do a pan style with a higher hydration dough (70%+) like American round, Detroit or Sicilian. Some of those get good results at a lower temperature bake.
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Offline invertedisdead

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Re: I got a pizza stone, now what?
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2018, 10:30:56 AM »
You're going to need to be able to cook the pizza in 90 seconds or less to get those Neapolitan textures. For home oven baking, you might consider trying a different style of pizza.


Offline mileniarista

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Re: I got a pizza stone, now what?
« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2018, 01:51:15 PM »
Thank you all for your tips, I've just made a couple of dough balls following the NY Style recipe:

100% regular flour (will try to find a higher protein one next week)
63% water
2,5% salt
2% olive oil
0,25% active dry yeast

After mixing in my cheap mixer (see attached image) dough was 28C / 82.4F very sticky and soft. I put oil on my hands and shaped it into two balls on the oiled marble countertop. Both went into the fridge in those plastic tupperwares properly oiled too.

When I mentioned my oven was 250C /480F I was referring to the highest number in the dial. I already ordered an IR thermometer from Amazon (quite a deal 10,99 with free shipping: https://www.amazon.es/gp/product/B01NBHU7UT/?tag=pmak-20) to check the actual temperature my stone can reach. Unless you suggest otherwise I will leave this balls at least 48 hours in the fridge and bake them in one go with grated mozzarella (no fresh one) placing the stone closer to the broiler this time and leaving it on all the time.

Wish me luck!

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Online Dangerous Salumi

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  • Posts: 422
  • Location: Few miles west of the George Washington Bridge
  • Using our home grown culture to leaven our dough
Re: I got a pizza stone, now what?
« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2018, 01:58:31 PM »
Thank you all for your tips, I've just made a couple of dough balls following the NY Style recipe:

100% regular flour (will try to find a higher protein one next week)
63% water
2,5% salt
2% olive oil
0,25% active dry yeast

After mixing in my cheap mixer (see attached image) dough was 28C / 82.4F very sticky and soft. I put oil on my hands and shaped it into two balls on the oiled marble countertop. Both went into the fridge in those plastic tupperwares properly oiled too.

When I mentioned my oven was 250C /480F I was referring to the highest number in the dial. I already ordered an IR thermometer from Amazon (quite a deal 10,99 with free shipping: https://www.amazon.es/gp/product/B01NBHU7UT/?tag=pmak-20) to check the actual temperature my stone can reach. Unless you suggest otherwise I will leave this balls at least 48 hours in the fridge and bake them in one go with grated mozzarella (no fresh one) placing the stone closer to the broiler this time and leaving it on all the time.

Wish me luck!

You dont need luck. Its obvious you have skill.
Have a Dangerous day!


They say that competitive eating is the battleground upon which God and Lucifer wage war for mens souls my friends, and they are right.  - George Shea, Chairman, Major League Eating

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