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Author Topic: How does Corn Oil differ from other oils?  (Read 248 times)

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Offline stamina888

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How does Corn Oil differ from other oils?
« on: June 17, 2017, 08:26:17 PM »
Is it more stronger or weaker tasting than olive oil?

Is it bad for certain pies?

Do you use a different amount?


Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Re: How does Corn Oil differ from other oils?
« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2017, 09:58:39 PM »
1) It comes from corn as opposed to olives.
2) It doesn't taste anything like olive oil (not made from olives)
3) Is neutral in flavor as opposed to olive oil, sesame oil, and other oils with a dominant flavor.
4) It can be substituted pound for pound for olive oil BUT you will get a different flavor. See #2 above.
5) I've not found it bad for different types of doughs/pizzas from a performance standpoint.
6) Corn oil or canola oil are commonly blended 10% olive oil 90% corn/canola oil / 20% olive oil 80% corn or canola oil and sold as a "blended oil". Blended oils have much of the same flavor/aroma characteristics as olive oil but are sold at a much lower cost.
I have never been a strong advocate of putting EVOO into the dough, straight corn or canola oil works just as well in the dough. If I do use olive oil in the dough I always try to use pomace olive oil (lowest grade olive oil) and then sprinkle a little EVOO on top of the pizza as soon as it comes out of the oven, the heat of the pizza "pops" releases the aromatics from the EVOO giving the pizza a great aroma and flavor that the consumer readily picks up on.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

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