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Offline donstavely

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Koda 16 hacks summarized
« on: November 01, 2020, 10:08:47 AM »
Note: I thought that this subject deserves to be separate from the "first bakes" thread, so it can continue discussing experiences and tips with the unhacked oven. 

I now have been working with the Koda 16 for a month now, and made a dozen or so pizzas.  Its Achilles heel: the huge temperature gradient from the back left to the front right of the stone.  While it is certainly possible to make great pizza with careful attention and technique, I find it more than annoying.  I certainly wouldn't want to deal with it in the frenzy of a big pizza party or a pop-up business.  Being a retired engineer with "Covid time" on my hands, I have experimented with every hack I could think of, or that has been suggested on this forum.  I thought it would be useful to summarize and critique them all in one place.  Here they are in some sort of logical order:

1. Lower Gas Control -- The Koda 16 control knob goes from full-on to something more like one half of that.  The easy and well-documented hack for lower flame after launch utilizes the narrow range of the knob between the HIGH and OFF positions.  My alternative was to swap in an adjustable regulator in place of the Ooni fixed regulator.  Being a low-pressure appliance, it operates below 1 PSI.  The lowest pressure adjustable regulator I could find was 0-5 PSI.  Still, this allows for a greater range of control than the above technique - maybe a half-turn between nearly off and full-on.  Pressures higher than normal high can be used momentarily as a kind of "virtual doming" without fear of melt-down.  Cost: less than $20 online at HD or Amazon.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B072LRCQD8/?tag=pmak-20

2. Blocking the Burner -- Folks have suggested shielding or blocking the burner in the corner to tame the hot zone.  The simplest, most effective way to do this is to block some of the holes in the burner tube itself.  2-1/2" 8D bright steel finishing nails cut down to about 1/4" long from the hardware store fit about right.  More info and pics here:
https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=61419.msg644233#msg644233
It is pretty effective at reducing the amount of turning required to get an even bake.  I recommend this as the one simplest, cheapest, and lightest-touch hack for folks not wanting to do anything more radical or invasive.

3. Blocking the Opening -- Folks have also suggested partially blocking some of the mouth of the oven to keep the heat near the front of the stone.  Blocking the top of the opening like on a conventional pizza oven might be a bad idea, since the natural flow of the flame is across the top of the oven and out.  Blocking the bottom half keeps the incoming cold air up off of the stone.  Here was the original idea:
https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=61419.msg644469#msg644469
I just recently finished a more permanent version, using furnace duct sheet aluminum and steel wire from the hardware store.  I made side brackets out of angle aluminum which fit under existing screws in the bottom, so no drilling into the oven has required.  Pic below.  Using it for pre-heat only, it did increase the temperature of the front of the stone by about 50F.  It might be good paired with the burner hack above.  Personally, I like the following hack better.

4. Manual Rotating Stone -- Of course the logical next step is to make the stone rotate.  This is not just about avoiding the turning peel, although it does make it much easier to make small rotations and to check the back of the pie without cooling the bottom.  It is as much about even pre-heating of the stone.  Just one 180-degree turn about three-quarters of the way through the warm-up makes for a much more evenly cooked crust.  All it takes is a round 16-inch cordierite stone from Amazon, and a 6-inch lazy susan bearing like this:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0006LBVDS/?tag=pmak-20
The only tricky part is that the zinc plating MUST be removed from the bearing to be safe.  The second pic below shows a new galvanized 6-inch bearing and a 3-inch bearing that has had the plating removed.  How-to is discussed here:
https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=58616.msg643594#msg643594
Now all you do is lift the Ooni stone out, set the bearing on the oven floor centered left-right and front-back, and center the stone on top of the bearing.  Everything seems to stay in place during use, without needing to be more firmly attached.  This $30 to $40 solution will make your life with the Koda 16 much more enjoyable.

5. Motorized Rotating Stone -- The ultimate luxury hack.  I tried to learn from other folks' pioneering experiences on this forum and elsewhere, take the best ideas, and then come up with a kind of "Gen 2" design:   
https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=61419.msg644904#msg644904
It takes more shop capability, and it requires drilling two holes in your precious new oven (kiss your warranty goodbye).  One hole is in the oven floor for the spindle, and one is in the bottom cover to attach the motor mount.  (There are other ways to attach the motor mount without another hole, but this is the simplest, and what is one more hole after that first one?)  This surgery requires removing the bottom cover, which is straightforward, but the screws tend to be tough to loosen after the oven has had some use.  I used a 3-inch bearing instead of the 6-inch just so it would sit down a tad lower into the recess in the oven floor.  The smaller bearing alone is tippier, but the spindle bearing and plate stabilizes the stone.   

So bottom line?  IMO you owe it to yourself to make your Koda 16 at least a little easier and more enjoyable to use.  I hope this list provides a useful range of options, and that others will add to it.  Peace and pizza.

Don 
       
     

Offline barryvabeach

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Re: Koda 16 hacks summarized
« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2020, 08:33:29 PM »
Nice write up Don. 
Current Ovens  -  BS, Halo Versa 16
Mixers .   Electrolux ( ANK ) ,  Bosch Compact, IM-5S
Mills - Retsel, Lee .

Offline robertm

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Re: Koda 16 hacks summarized
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2020, 09:55:03 AM »
Don you are a gentleman and a scholar for doing all of this.  It will improve the quality of many future pies!

I have been contemplating purchasing the Koda 16 for Christmas.  The issues with uneven stone temp and overly hot corner have given me pause.  Your simple hacks give me confidence I will be able to produce great meals for the family with this oven.

Thank you!

Offline robertm

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Re: Koda 16 hacks summarized
« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2020, 10:13:19 AM »
Would you mind adding a link for a quality 16-inch cordierite stone?  I thought it would be an easy search but there's a lot out there with conflicting reviews. 
« Last Edit: November 05, 2020, 10:23:28 AM by robertm »

Offline donstavely

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Re: Koda 16 hacks summarized
« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2020, 03:27:26 PM »
Thanks for the kind words, Robert.  I hope it helps.

The 16.5" stone I bought is this, but it is out of stock:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008O88VK6/?tag=pmak-20
This one is the same size but cost more than I paid:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B005IF2ZNM/?tag=pmak-20
I think this is the same thing at BB&B:
https://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/store/product/pizzacraft-trade-cordierite-16-5-inch-round-pizza-stone-in-natural/1044291617?skuId=44291617&mcid=OS_googlepla
My wife get $10-off and 20%-off coupons all the time, so this could be the best deal.
I noticed that an Amazon's Choice entry says "16x16 round" in the title but then says it is actually15" in the specs.
This is a good price for a 16" stone, but it is a little thinner at 0.5" vs 0.6" thick:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B089D2Y3TK/?tag=pmak-20
If you believe that thicker is better, then this 15" by 3/4" fatty is intriguing:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0777SCV9Z/?tag=pmak-20

To be honest, I was not as tuned in to the specific issue with the Koda 16 when I made my purchase decision.  I assumed that some turning would be required, as it is on most every live-fire oven (unless it spins of course).  If I had to do it over again, maybe I would have been better off spending the extra $$ on an Ooni Pro with gas attachment.  But the look and feel of the 16 was appealing, and then the tinkerer in me took over.  Now I have something better than the Pro, at least for my purposes.   



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Offline FRGus723

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Re: Koda 16 hacks summarized
« Reply #5 on: November 12, 2020, 05:05:15 PM »
Note: I thought that this subject deserves to be separate from the "first bakes" thread, so it can continue discussing experiences and tips with the unhacked oven. 

I now have been working with the Koda 16 for a month now, and made a dozen or so pizzas.  Its Achilles heel: the huge temperature gradient from the back left to the front right of the stone.  While it is certainly possible to make great pizza with careful attention and technique, I find it more than annoying.  I certainly wouldn't want to deal with it in the frenzy of a big pizza party or a pop-up business.  Being a retired engineer with "Covid time" on my hands, I have experimented with every hack I could think of, or that has been suggested on this forum.  I thought it would be useful to summarize and critique them all in one place.  Here they are in some sort of logical order:

1. Lower Gas Control -- The Koda 16 control knob goes from full-on to something more like one half of that.  The easy and well-documented hack for lower flame after launch utilizes the narrow range of the knob between the HIGH and OFF positions.  My alternative was to swap in an adjustable regulator in place of the Ooni fixed regulator.  Being a low-pressure appliance, it operates below 1 PSI.  The lowest pressure adjustable regulator I could find was 0-5 PSI.  Still, this allows for a greater range of control than the above technique - maybe a half-turn between nearly off and full-on.  Pressures higher than normal high can be used momentarily as a kind of "virtual doming" without fear of melt-down.  Cost: less than $20 online at HD or Amazon.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B072LRCQD8/?tag=pmak-20

2. Blocking the Burner -- Folks have suggested shielding or blocking the burner in the corner to tame the hot zone.  The simplest, most effective way to do this is to block some of the holes in the burner tube itself.  2-1/2" 8D bright steel finishing nails cut down to about 1/4" long from the hardware store fit about right.  More info and pics here:
https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=61419.msg644233#msg644233
It is pretty effective at reducing the amount of turning required to get an even bake.  I recommend this as the one simplest, cheapest, and lightest-touch hack for folks not wanting to do anything more radical or invasive.

3. Blocking the Opening -- Folks have also suggested partially blocking some of the mouth of the oven to keep the heat near the front of the stone.  Blocking the top of the opening like on a conventional pizza oven might be a bad idea, since the natural flow of the flame is across the top of the oven and out.  Blocking the bottom half keeps the incoming cold air up off of the stone.  Here was the original idea:
https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=61419.msg644469#msg644469
I just recently finished a more permanent version, using furnace duct sheet aluminum and steel wire from the hardware store.  I made side brackets out of angle aluminum which fit under existing screws in the bottom, so no drilling into the oven has required.  Pic below.  Using it for pre-heat only, it did increase the temperature of the front of the stone by about 50F.  It might be good paired with the burner hack above.  Personally, I like the following hack better.

4. Manual Rotating Stone -- Of course the logical next step is to make the stone rotate.  This is not just about avoiding the turning peel, although it does make it much easier to make small rotations and to check the back of the pie without cooling the bottom.  It is as much about even pre-heating of the stone.  Just one 180-degree turn about three-quarters of the way through the warm-up makes for a much more evenly cooked crust.  All it takes is a round 16-inch cordierite stone from Amazon, and a 6-inch lazy susan bearing like this:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0006LBVDS/?tag=pmak-20
The only tricky part is that the zinc plating MUST be removed from the bearing to be safe.  The second pic below shows a new galvanized 6-inch bearing and a 3-inch bearing that has had the plating removed.  How-to is discussed here:
https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=58616.msg643594#msg643594
Now all you do is lift the Ooni stone out, set the bearing on the oven floor centered left-right and front-back, and center the stone on top of the bearing.  Everything seems to stay in place during use, without needing to be more firmly attached.  This $30 to $40 solution will make your life with the Koda 16 much more enjoyable.

5. Motorized Rotating Stone -- The ultimate luxury hack.  I tried to learn from other folks' pioneering experiences on this forum and elsewhere, take the best ideas, and then come up with a kind of "Gen 2" design:   
https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=61419.msg644904#msg644904
It takes more shop capability, and it requires drilling two holes in your precious new oven (kiss your warranty goodbye).  One hole is in the oven floor for the spindle, and one is in the bottom cover to attach the motor mount.  (There are other ways to attach the motor mount without another hole, but this is the simplest, and what is one more hole after that first one?)  This surgery requires removing the bottom cover, which is straightforward, but the screws tend to be tough to loosen after the oven has had some use.  I used a 3-inch bearing instead of the 6-inch just so it would sit down a tad lower into the recess in the oven floor.  The smaller bearing alone is tippier, but the spindle bearing and plate stabilizes the stone.   

So bottom line?  IMO you owe it to yourself to make your Koda 16 at least a little easier and more enjoyable to use.  I hope this list provides a useful range of options, and that others will add to it.  Peace and pizza.

Don 
       
   

Don,

Does the regulator hack allow you to control the flame lower than usual?  I don't think I really need higher (unless a doming situation) but going to a lower flame for using it as a camp oven for fish etc.  If I want to bake a cake or something I would like to be able to have more control with the regulator to lower the temp vs going back to the almost off position hack.

Offline donstavely

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Re: Koda 16 hacks summarized
« Reply #6 on: November 13, 2020, 10:53:06 AM »
Does the regulator hack allow you to control the flame lower than usual?  I don't think I really need higher (unless a doming situation) but going to a lower flame for using it as a camp oven for fish etc.  If I want to bake a cake or something I would like to be able to have more control with the regulator to lower the temp vs going back to the almost off position hack.
First, the short answer is yes, this type of regulator will go all the way down to zero pressure.  In fact, you need to turn it up a ways in order to get any gas at all.  Since the oven normally uses about 1/2 PSI and this is a 5 PSI regulator, we only use about 10% of the multi-turn control.  Still, this amounts to more room on the dial than the almost-off method. 
I must caution that this is NOT a recommended use, so proceed at your own risk.  It is safe as long as the oven is lit when messing with the pressure, but it would be very bad if the regulator inadvertently got set way too high before lighting (lost eyebrows or worse).  I was thinking about adding some sort of physical stop on the knob to limit it travel to make it totally safe. 
Frankly, I have continued to look for a more ideal solution.  What I have learned requires the long answer, so I will describe it in a separate post. 

Offline donstavely

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Re: Koda 16 hacks summarized
« Reply #7 on: November 13, 2020, 03:28:32 PM »
Does the regulator hack allow you to control the flame lower than usual?  I don't think I really need higher (unless a doming situation) but going to a lower flame for using it as a camp oven for fish etc.  If I want to bake a cake or something I would like to be able to have more control with the regulator to lower the temp vs going back to the almost off position hack.
Here is the long answer.  Since barryvabeach schooled me about high- vs low-pressure regulators, I have been on a quest for a really good adjustable low-pressure solution.  Along the way I have learned more about the subject than I intended to.  Read on if it is of interest to you too.
First, the fixed low-pressure regulator that comes with the Koda is marked 2.8kPa, which is about 0.4PSIG.  This is apparently the standard for low-pressure gas appliances, like barbecues, space heaters, etc. It also equals 11 inches WC (water column).  This unit of measure is nice because you can easily measure it yourself with a length of plastic tubing (see pic).  I verified that the Koda regulator was indeed 11" WC.  Other regulators I had measured between 10" and 13".
Searching for "low pressure adjustable propane regulator", the only type I found was this:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07GZNMS9S/?tag=pmak-20
I recognized that I actually had one of these on an old portable BBQ grill.  Since it connects to a 1-lb propane bottle, I also ordered this adaptor:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00N9HKOY8/?tag=pmak-20
The regulator control pushes on, and then goes from low to high.  I measured the range as 7" to above 13" WC. Trying it on the grill, indeed the lowest flame did not get as low as one would like.  I was discouraged, until I found that there is a setscrew on the control knob underneath the foil label.  I could turn the setscrew and move the range up and down - even to zero.  Setting it by watching the flame, I decided that a range of 3" to almost 10" was about right (see pics).
Finally, I replaced the setscrew with a bolt so that I could adjust the range without the Allen wrench (see pic).  I also cut and spliced the adapter hose between the regulator and the tank, just so that it was neater and more convenient to adjust.  Note that the hose clamps are important on the high-pressure (+100 PSI) side of the regulator.
I THINK I will be happy with this solution.  I will withhold final judgement until I have a few pizza sessions under my belt, both NP style and 3-4 minute bakes.     

Offline barryvabeach

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Re: Koda 16 hacks summarized
« Reply #8 on: November 13, 2020, 08:31:31 PM »
Don,  very impressive work.  My guess is that you open up the Koda vol control to full, then use the regulator to adjust the flame? 
Current Ovens  -  BS, Halo Versa 16
Mixers .   Electrolux ( ANK ) ,  Bosch Compact, IM-5S
Mills - Retsel, Lee .

Offline donstavely

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Re: Koda 16 hacks summarized
« Reply #9 on: November 15, 2020, 10:48:51 AM »
Thanks, Barry.  Yes, the regulator has the greater range, so on my first session of 3-4 minute pies, I was able to simply go from high for pre-heat and low at launch and cook, all with the Koda control left on high. 
In fact, the lower the regulator is set, the less the Koda control seems to effect the flame.  This struck me as a little odd, though.  I had assumed that the Koda control was a needle valve, like on a barbecue grill.  It seems to act more like a regulator itself given this behavior.  It also looks and feels suspiciously like the regulator on a propane patio heater, with its push-in control with igniter.  But then why the fixed 11" WC regulator at the tank?  There is precedent for two-stage regulators, but on those the first stage regulates down to 10 or 20 PSI and the second stage down to <1/2 PSI.  Your thoughts?

Speaking of barbecue grills, an off topic addition:  The 5 PSI adjustable regulator that I first tried on the Koda has now found a home on my gas grill.  I have always been underwhelmed with the ability of my Weber Genesis grill to put a good sear on a piece of meat.  I think modern grills have become too wimpy in order to be idiot-proof and fail-safe.  So in this case, I want more fire instead of less.  I can crank up the regulator well beyond 20" WC while keeping a nice stable flame.  I calibrated the dial so I can reset it back to the 13" WC stock regulator pressure when not needing the "turbo mode" (see pic).  I think it is safe as long as I use standard pressure whenever I am not right there tending it.  It is a huge upgrade to my grilling ability.         

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Offline morrissey

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Re: Koda 16 hacks summarized
« Reply #10 on: December 01, 2020, 01:13:54 PM »
Hi all

Updating you on my ooni koda 16 hack. I went for the Rotisserie method as I have minimal tool knowledge or access to more fancy things. I ran into a problem, when I bent the metal rotisserie skewer rod to place the 16.5" stone on, the rods broke off due to them getting weak (think bending a paper clip a few times). I did find this on the ebay: https://www.ebay.com/itm/1-16-Stainless-Steel-304-Plate-Round-Circle-Disc-16-Diameter-0625-16ga/284030101494?hash=item42218367f6:g:a3IAAOSwTjRfdNpI . I think i found a metal worker locally that will be able to weld it onto the original stainless steel rotisserie part that goes into the motor. Does anyone foresee any problems with this? Is this metal from the ebay link safe for food consumption?


Offline barryvabeach

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Re: Koda 16 hacks summarized
« Reply #11 on: December 01, 2020, 07:36:27 PM »
Your local welder can weld the original rotiss metal rods back on,  or actually any stainless steel rods -  they only have to support the stone, and they don't need to be but so long.  What you posted should work,  but you could easily get by with a 14 inch  piece of steel.   Since the heat is coming from above, all you need is enough support so that it won't tip over,  -  the more I think about it,  even a 12 inch round would probably be fine.   I doubt I could find it,  by deep on the Blackstone mods, someone took off the metal platter and just connected the rod to the stone directly, can't recall if he drilled through it or not, but it still worked fine. 
Current Ovens  -  BS, Halo Versa 16
Mixers .   Electrolux ( ANK ) ,  Bosch Compact, IM-5S
Mills - Retsel, Lee .

Offline morrissey

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Re: Koda 16 hacks summarized
« Reply #12 on: December 01, 2020, 09:51:16 PM »
Your local welder can weld the original rotiss metal rods back on,  or actually any stainless steel rods -  they only have to support the stone, and they don't need to be but so long.  What you posted should work,  but you could easily get by with a 14 inch  piece of steel.   Since the heat is coming from above, all you need is enough support so that it won't tip over,  -  the more I think about it,  even a 12 inch round would probably be fine.   I doubt I could find it,  by deep on the Blackstone mods, someone took off the metal platter and just connected the rod to the stone directly, can't recall if he drilled through it or not, but it still worked fine.

Good to know. I actually do not want to use the whole "knuckle" contraption with the metal rods  that the original mod used. When I used that it makes the actual cooking stone about 1.5-2" above the bottom of the original oven and very close to the flame guards. If I get the local welder to weld the plate directly on the rod that attaches to the motor I can align it so the stone is sitting at the original stone level. My thoughts on getting a disc that is the same diameter as the baking stone is to prevent any wobble of the stone and less precise placement of the baking stone on the rotating disc. But perhaps I am over thinking it..

Offline barryvabeach

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Re: Koda 16 hacks summarized
« Reply #13 on: December 02, 2020, 07:17:33 AM »
I agree, you want to keep the height as low as you can, and talk to your welder,  it is difficult for some to weld a thick piece, like the rotiss rod, to thin metal.  My concern is that if the disc is the full size, you will have to get the hole in the floor of the oven exactly right, or the disk will hit the front ledge or one of the side ledges.  If you make the disk slightly undersized, that won't be a problem.  Wobble will be more of a concern with the rest of the assembly, how sturdy you have mounted the motor, how deep the shaft fits into rotiss motor.  If those 2 parts are sturdy, and you used a 1 inch diameter disc -  yes the stone would wobble and perhaps fall off.  Once you got to a 10 inch disc -  the stone would have support for 10 inches across the center, and would be sticking off the stone about 3 inches on all sides -  which would be plenty enough.  At 12 inches, only 2 inches would be sticking out of each side.   

One other thought,  you need to size the shaft and disc assembly so that it will fit into the oven.  When I made my mount,  I put a fair amount of distance from the bottom of the oven to the rotiss motor - so that meant the shaft was pretty long.  As a result, when the shaft was screwed to the disc, the assembly would not fit into the oven.  That is why I ended up with cutting the shaft in 2 and adding a connector below the oven.  Of course, my design is different since I was using rollers on a plate resting on the floor of the oven,  I did not need the shaft to be rigid.
Current Ovens  -  BS, Halo Versa 16
Mixers .   Electrolux ( ANK ) ,  Bosch Compact, IM-5S
Mills - Retsel, Lee .

Offline donstavely

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Re: Koda 16 hacks summarized
« Reply #14 on: December 02, 2020, 11:59:49 AM »
As Barry says, the metal plate does not to be anywhere near as big as the stone.  Mine is 8" for my 16.5" stone.  And of course it doesn't need to be round, a square plate is fine.  Once you get the stone centered it will stay put, and not need to be centered again unless you remove it.  Your welder will certainly have some steel plate lying around that he can use, so you shouldn't need to buy anything special.

If you can find a coupler or connector for the rotisserie rod as Barry did, there is an even simpler solution.  Instead of welding the rotisserie rod to the plate, just get a stainless steel bolt, nut, and lockwasher at the hardware store, as I show in my post:
https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=61419.msg645021#msg645021
Then you can use the bolt as the upper spindle and connect it to a short length of the rotisserie rod to the motor.  Choose a bolt diameter that just fits into your coupler, which will be fatter than the 1/4" bolt I used.  Add just enough (stainless) washers so that the plate and stone spins freely.

I used a flathead bolt and countersunk the hole in the plate so it was flush, and the stone lies flat.  If countersinking the hole is a problem, you can use a roundhead bolt, but you would need a few spacers (like stainless washers) between the edge of the plate and the stone so it doesn't rock on the head of the bolt.  Or if you have a masonry drill bit or Dremel tool, drill a little dimple in the center of the bottom of your stone.  Then the stone would drop over the head of the bolt when dead-centered.  Slick, no?   

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Offline barryvabeach

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Re: Koda 16 hacks summarized
« Reply #15 on: December 02, 2020, 08:37:55 PM »
I got a request for an explanation of my coupler.  So I used the standard  ( 5/16 IIRC ) square key stock that fits into the rotis motor.  I had made a mount for the motor so that it attached to the underside of the oven,  probably hanging down about 4 inches below the bottom of the stone ,  then the stock goes 2 inches deeper into the rotis motor,  so overall, it is a little longer than 6 inches.  The oven opening is 5 inches,  and due to the size of the square plate I used, it can't be tilted much on the way in, so it would not fit.  I had a piece of channel ( u shaped metal  ) that had an opening around 1/4 inch .  I cut the key stock in 2, then filed the sides so that 2 of the ends where the cut was ,  were just a pressure fit to the connector, then inserted the one stock into the rotis motor, slid the motor into position, pushed the connector on the free end of the key stock, then put the plate with the other key stock attached into the oven, and placed it into the hole that I drilled in the oven floor, and rotated the plate so that the filed end of the key stock fit into the connector.  There are probably simpler ways to do it, like making the bracket shorter so the rotis motor would be closer to the floor,  or making the bracket deeper so I could have used round rod that was drilled to accept the key stock, and threaded with allen keys to lock it in place.  In my method, there is a bearing assembly that sits under the stone to make sure it is level as it rotates.  In one of the youtube videos I have seen, it looks like they just rest the motor on something - though I don't know how that would keep the stone level , if you pushed down on one side of the stone while loading or retrieving a pie, I would think the motor would be pushed to one side and the stone would then be on an angle.   
Current Ovens  -  BS, Halo Versa 16
Mixers .   Electrolux ( ANK ) ,  Bosch Compact, IM-5S
Mills - Retsel, Lee .

Offline gdepozsgay

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Re: Koda 16 hacks summarized
« Reply #16 on: December 03, 2020, 08:50:28 AM »
I'm glad I read this post. I was about to pull the trigger on a 16 and thought I would search the forum for comments. Have to say that I am discouraged. I'm not afraid of mods and hacks but dropping 400 on a very simple unit like the 16 and then having to mod it to a Frankenstein does not appeal to me at all. This thing should work right out of the box at that price. I did the lazy susan mod on my Kettle conversion some time past but if it did not sit on the grates with some protruding screws to hold it there, it would move around when manipulated so I don't know how it stays put on the flat stone of the 16. Back to the drawing board.
George

Offline donstavely

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Re: Koda 16 hacks summarized
« Reply #17 on: December 03, 2020, 11:07:51 AM »
I'm glad I read this post. I was about to pull the trigger on a 16 and thought I would search the forum for comments. Have to say that I am discouraged. I'm not afraid of mods and hacks but dropping 400 on a very simple unit like the 16 and then having to mod it to a Frankenstein does not appeal to me at all. This thing should work right out of the box at that price. I did the lazy susan mod on my Kettle conversion some time past but if it did not sit on the grates with some protruding screws to hold it there, it would move around when manipulated so I don't know how it stays put on the flat stone of the 16. Back to the drawing board.

FWIW, I paid $500 for mine and I am glad I did.  There aren't many ovens for the price that can do a 90-second Neapolitan or a 16-inch New York, with the same convenience and control as cooking a steak on my barbecue grill.  The 16 is as well-reviewed as any home oven I have seen, with the possible exception of the Breville (apples and oranges, however). 

Of course it works right out of the box.  There are countless videos of people making great-looking pies, and my first cook before I started my mods was pretty darn good.  I probably shouldn't have come off so negatively in my posts, about my annoyance with the uneven heat.  Honestly, I see about the same level of peeking-and-turning with every live-fire oven out there.  I just wanted to make a good tool better, and share my experience.   

I will be curious to hear what you finally decide to buy.  Keep us posted!       

Offline gdepozsgay

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Re: Koda 16 hacks summarized
« Reply #18 on: December 03, 2020, 04:01:00 PM »
FWIW, I paid $500 for mine and I am glad I did.  There aren't many ovens for the price that can do a 90-second Neapolitan or a 16-inch New York, with the same convenience and control as cooking a steak on my barbecue grill.  The 16 is as well-reviewed as any home oven I have seen, with the possible exception of the Breville (apples and oranges, however). 

Of course it works right out of the box.  There are countless videos of people making great-looking pies, and my first cook before I started my mods was pretty darn good.  I probably shouldn't have come off so negatively in my posts, about my annoyance with the uneven heat.  Honestly, I see about the same level of peeking-and-turning with every live-fire oven out there.  I just wanted to make a good tool better, and share my experience.   

I will be curious to hear what you finally decide to buy.  Keep us posted!     
BBQ Guys has it on sale for $399 and the Ooni site says $499 but both say March 2021 delivery. What's up with that?
George

Offline donstavely

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Re: Koda 16 hacks summarized
« Reply #19 on: December 03, 2020, 05:14:32 PM »
BBQ Guys has it on sale for $399 and the Ooni site says $499 but both say March 2021 delivery. What's up with that?

I wanted mine ASAP and was willing to pay full price in order to get some sessions in before the dead of winter here in Colorado.  I ordered in late September.  Most places, including the Ooni site were saying December delivery, but Williams Sonoma said late October.  I wondered if they really had better availability, or if it was BS.  When I ordered, I got an estimated delivery of October 15th to 19th.  Then I got a shipping notice on September 24th, and it showed up on the 29th! 

Today W-S say on their website "Order now for delivery Jan. 22 - Jan. 26".  I see some other places on Google Shopping that seem to have availability now, but at full price.

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