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  • #1601 by Icelandr on 10 Aug 2021
  • Thanks Scott! I have indeed looked there before and apart from the cost and likely horrendous shipping costs, it could be a fun experiment but I think I might break out the Arne’s torch first!
  • #1602 by Icelandr on 15 Aug 2021
  • Perhaps there are reasons why Nanaimo BC isn’t yet a world heritage Pizza city.
    From a favourite Italian restaurant, had never tried their pizza but similar to my Boston Pizza clone. No fire restrictions for electric ovens I guess. Will try the more local wood fired pizza place again.
  • #1603 by Icelandr on 28 Aug 2021
  • It is difficult. No rain and fire regulations say no to open fires BBQ’s, oh and wood fired ovens!
    As I watch the postings here on the Neapolitan board, I really want to partake, improve skills, make perhaps a great Neapolitan pizza.
    Tonight out of frustration another Boston Pizza Clone was baked and somewhat shamefully enjoyed. The Ooni is back ordered, volunteer firemen live very close by, so it was the home oven and a tasty but short! ferment dough, resulting in tastes from the past, likely followed by bloating later!


    Soon, I hope to return to hopefully get my pizza to the level now apparent on this great board - but tonight . .  . .
  • #1604 by crawsdaddy on 29 Aug 2021
  • volunteer firemen live very close by,


    invite the firemen over for Neapolitan pizza, make them complicit with the crime. Problem solved.

    Dan
  • #1605 by halfprice on 29 Aug 2021
  • It is difficult. No rain and fire regulations say no to open fires BBQ’s, oh and wood fired ovens!
    As I watch the postings here on the Neapolitan board, I really want to partake, improve skills, make perhaps a great Neapolitan pizza.
    Tonight out of frustration another Boston Pizza Clone was baked and somewhat shamefully enjoyed. The Ooni is back ordered, volunteer firemen live very close by, so it was the home oven and a tasty but short! ferment dough, resulting in tastes from the past, likely followed by bloating later!


    Soon, I hope to return to hopefully get my pizza to the level now apparent on this great board - but tonight . .  . .
    You always make a great looking pie. I bet this one tasted great too

    Jerry
  • #1606 by Icelandr on 04 Sep 2021
  • A “Little Dance of Joy”
    I planned a couple of practice balls today with nowhere to bake but in the oven BUT it is now raining so for the first time since June 25, I will light the oven . . . Carefully!
  • #1607 by Icelandr on 04 Sep 2021
  • So much fun, some mistakes and some good eating!
    My plan was to make some smaller balls than normal, based on Jackie Tran’s posts then mess with them to the point of bake and trash them . . . Then the rain! I can sneak in a bake! No one will know . .  ..


    The dough for some reason was textbook, well, for me. 66% hydration, 2.8% salt, 4.5% sourdough, 12 hours bulk 10-11 hours ball all at 20.5° C average,  pluviometer at bake 27.


    Interesting to me was the fact that at this time in our house I did not need the spiffy fermentation chamber controlled to the degree! The house was just right!


    Once again based on Jackie Tran’s thread I once again went to over 500° C . . . .might have worked better for the first pizza if I hadn’t forgotten to clean the turning peel for the past 2 months of no use! A run to wipe and burnt before return. Yes, crescent is the new round! One sticky spot!
    The second pizza was a please give me what I have been missing, it was great! Not perhaps Neapolitan but damn it was good!


    Hope it rains some more, June to September is too long between pizza in the PizzaParty!
  • #1608 by Pete_da_Bayer on 05 Sep 2021
  • Good to see you back baking Neapolitan pizza Greg! It's true, when they say it's like riding a bike. You don't forget, how to do it. The pizza looks really nice. I actually prefer smaller dough balls, too. My standard formula is 4 balls out of 500g flour. I end up with 200-215g for each, depending on the hydration.
  • #1609 by Arne_Jervell on 05 Sep 2021
  • Great to see you posting Neapolitan again! Those are some truly vibrant and wonderful looking pizzas. The cornicione displays some very nice freckling and good color.

    It's been too long. I wish you plenty more rain and more pizza fun.
  • #1610 by Icelandr on 05 Sep 2021
  • Thanks for your comments Andy well wishes.
    It was so nice to be able to bake again but it caught me off guard as I had done no shopping for ingredients and had to use what was on hand. I know next time there will be a sausage mushroom Taleggio pie!


    After re-reading Jackie trans thread, I had to try 500° again and learned the old guy has to be a bit quicker, at that temp things happen fast. I have never timed my bakes, or forget what they were when I have noted them so really can’t use that as a guide or excuse.
    My pizza used to start with 260 gram ball, then 250, then for quite a while 240 and I usually”set the rim” and protect the cornichone. This time with 220 grams I stretched and flattened the whole thing. When placed on the peel, for curiosities sake I measured and it like my peel it was 12”. I use very little flour on the peel, last night for the Margherita I wished I had used a bit more as the one spot almost caused disaster.


    I so look forward to baking regularly again and hope to improve the results!
  • #1611 by Icelandr on 13 Sep 2021
  • Another bake was allowed by the fire guards and was moderately successful.

    The dough was a tad reluctant to rise as I had missed the timing of the sourdough refresh, but with a little time in the fermentation box at an increased temperature it reached 26 on the pluviometer, a touch lower than my desired level. 66% hydration, 4.5% sourdough, 230 gram dough balls, about 12 hours each in bulk and ball.

    Decided once again to flatten, or not “protect” the cornichone, and to keep the oven at or around 500° C.

    • Margherita - unhappy with cheese melt, at that temp it flows all over the place, 80 second bake
    • Sausage, Mushroom, Taleggio, Red Onion, 95 second bake
    • Spinach, mixed diced peppers, ham, Mozzarella, Taleggio, Smoked CacioCovallo, 83 second bake
    Not particularly pleased with results as I found the dough a bit tougher to the tooth and missed the look and lightness of the cornichone. Crust was thinner than usual likely causing the perceived toughness.

    Next time!
  • #1612 by Icelandr on 17 Sep 2021
  • Be careful what you wish for . . .

    I was waiting desperately for a little rain to lessen the chances of causing a fire on this very dry island. Wishes Granted . . .in Spades! I write this as I prepare to light the oven. The rain is almost horizontal and the winds are howling, blowing 15 km and gusting to 42! The logs  out front are pounding against the shore about 15 meters away and the Generator is at the ready . . . Let’s do Pizza!

    After last weeks slow dough, because I didn’t refresh the sourdough adequately, I both increased the % AND nurtured the Sd more carefully, as you have guessed a bit of over fermentation dealt with through a fermentation chamber and incantations, not to be repeated here. 66% hydration, 12 hour bulk 12+ hours ball, pluviometer, even after threats was 29+. Dough was very nice, extensible, soft and delicate, rewarding I would say. Bake temp a bit lower 485° C and I think for me it worked better.

    It was Good Fun, Good Food, very positive change from my usual grumblings! No records set, but the winds are receding, as is the wine . .  . . Cheers!
  • #1613 by amolapizza on 18 Sep 2021
  • They look wonderful!

    Congratulations on the end to the fire season!
  • #1614 by Jackie Tran on 18 Sep 2021
  • Nice work Greg.   If I may add, the smaller you go on the doughball, the quicker you must bake, relative to your hydration level.  A 240gm 12 inch pie will bake significantly longer than a 180gm 12 inch pie.   Try baking a few at 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s, ànd 70s all with a high floor temp and a tremendous overhead flame of course.   The longer you bake, the more dry and tough the cornice will become..   You'll get a firm sense of where your bake time needs to be for a certain hydration level and ball size.
  • #1615 by Arne_Jervell on 18 Sep 2021
  • I don't know what sounds more terrifying, the fire season of the end of it.

    Either way, a great comeback. Wonderful pizza, your signature firmly written all over them. :drool:

  • #1616 by Icelandr on 18 Sep 2021
  • Jackie Tran . . .I have great trouble remembering and recording bake times! Sharon kindly watches the fire and tells me how it’s going, temperature etc while I mutter things and build a pizza . . . Oops! Is most common. The launch, door goes back on briefly, then the watch and turn followed by lifting turning doming and it’s done! The only reason I had timings last bake is we had guests with apple watches wanting to use them!
    I understand the benefits and am very open to suggestions how to implement (and recording!) but my abstract randomness just may be in the way . . . .
  • #1617 by sk on 18 Sep 2021
  • Looking good as ever Greg.  Lack of practice is NOT showing on those pizzas!
  • #1618 by Icelandr on 19 Sep 2021
  • Thank you AmolaPizza, Arne and Scott!
    It felt awfully good to be able to make Neapolitan again and interesting to me the way the body and mind remember what they are supposed to be doing, OK, at times with some lapse, but there is an enjoyment of the simple things that have over the years become more familiar. It doesn’t always equate to great pizza, but satisfying as you go through the simple now familiar motions and always a very nice surprise when a tasty meal turns up. If I could muffle the critic at first look and bite all would be grand . . . But having fun once again!
  • #1619 by Icelandr on 26 Sep 2021
  • Two Guests for dinner, another chance to bake!

    Still, the vision I have does not translate to the ones on the plate, but they tasted pretty good! I used my fermentation box again and notice that the dough is a different temperature than that in the pluviometer, I guess because of the vertical shape and my heating is from the bottom. The pluviometer at bake said a 100% rise, but I think the dough was beyond that, very puffy, full of air, but easily deflated!
    66% hydration, sourdough 4.9%, 24 hours @21°, appx equal bulk and ball.

    • Margherita . . . Again stuck to the peel but recovered
    • Cherry tomatoes, black olives, finely sliced garlic, spinach, mozzarella
    • Pepperoni, mushroom, onion
    • An attempt at a Lilla Napoli pizza that I found compelling. Bacon (they would have used pancetta), finely sliced garlic, spinach, mozzarella, smoked Caccio Covallo, olive oil.
    I missed the cornichone, it was smaller and uneven, perhaps battered by ageing hands. Flavours were good, dough easily formed. Oven temps 470°-525°
    Thanks for looking!
    Oh, and the last pic is of the Lilla Napoli Pizza, attempted above, a ways to go, they sure make some fine looking pizza!
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