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  • #281 by mitchjg on 22 May 2018
  • What works for some do not work for others. I have found trying to follow The Pizza Bible has just been a disaster. I have zero clue how and I would LOVE to see Tony remove plastic wrap from off the top of the dough w/out completely destroying it.

    If you are fermenting your doughs on a tray covered with plastic wrap, it is not terribly unusual to get sticking.  The solution is pretty darn simple - give it a shot of PAM (or similar) on top before covering with plastic wrap.  Or, you could brush the top of the dough with a very light coating of vegetable oil.  No big deal.

    You can ferment in a container or whatever you do already for a "normal" recipe if that works better for you in avoiding the dough ball sticking.  No rule against it.

    I may try his recipe again, but w/out malt at first and definitely a 16". I tried the 13" recipe and size REALLY effects cook time. I "could" do the 13" but I would have to lower my oven rack for more heat on the bottom and less on the top. I had a 6 min. bake and the top was sizzling while the bottom was not even browned.

    Cooking my normal recipe of 16" I get 9 minute bakes before the top starts getting char and the bottom is a nice brown. I had two pizza baking session in a row that were very subpar. I had to go back to a more normal recipe a few days ago lol.

    I suspect the diameter of the pie has little to do with such significant differences in baking time.  What caused you to conclude that?  Did you follow the same recipe with the same thickness with the 2 different diameter pizzas?

    My guess would be it is probably related to ingredient differences such as malt.  The recipe is not terribly abnormal - the hydration is higher than most recipes for NY pizza (probably contributes to the stickiness you were experiencing).  But, pretty manageable. 

    What is different about your "normal" recipe?
  • #282 by BigLarry on 23 May 2018
  • I ferment in a large tupperware plastic container that cost £2.50 from our local supermarket (Asda) it is big enough to hold 4 dough balls and fits in the fridge.
  • #283 by icemanxp300 on 24 May 2018
  • It was just an assumption on my part that less dough took less time to cook. Now I want to make a 13" of the below recipe and see if I get a 9 minute bake out of it.

    My most recent recipe is this.

    100%   Flour 913g
    62%   Water 566g
    .55%    ADY     5g
    2%       Salt   18g
    1.1%   EVOO  10g
    4%     Sugar   36g

    Makes two 775g dough balls, more like 770g-772g after residue. I stretch to 16"

    Aside from higher hydration and double yeast the master dough is similar to my current recipe, except I do not degas my recipe and only do a 24 hr cf. The major difference would be 4% sugar in mine as compared to 2% malt in the master dough and doing a 24hr cf, degassing, re-balling and another 24hr cf for the master dough procedure.

    Since the saran on a cookie sheet was a complete disaster for me I was left w/the only option of rolling it out to get something. I have rolled out the top recipe before though and got a 9 minute bake.

    Would the higher hydration cause the cooking differences? I mean I can totally use the master dough recipe and I plan to again, but w/my oven rack positioned lower so I get more bottom heat. I had to move my rack higher from burning the bottom of my pizzas in the past so I can def. get that base browning better now that I know what to expect lol.

    Although the next time I will def. be making 16".
  • #284 by ptix on 21 Aug 2020
  • So the link to the errata page at the PizzaBible Blog doesn't work - where can you find the errata now ?
  • #285 by Pete-zza on 21 Aug 2020
  • So the link to the errata page at the PizzaBible Blog doesn't work - where can you find the errata now ?
    ptix,

    I wondered whether the errata page was archived at the Wayback Machine so I went to WM and searched for the errata page using the address http://www.thepizzabible.com/errata. This is what I found:

    https://web.archive.org/web/20191218172657/http://www.thepizzabible.com/errata

    To preserve the errata page, I cut and copied it, as follows:

    Errata

    Print Version
    Although The Pizza Bible had 3 writers, 3 editors and 3 proof readers, some errors and typos have still found their way to the page. The following are errors that appear in the first printing of The Pizza Bible and the kindle version. We appreciate your help in making these corrections to your copy.

    In the following dough recipes, please disregard the phrase Enough for 1 pizza under the recipe title:

    Master Dough with Starter, page 44
    Master Dough without Starter, page 48
    Organic Dough, page 173
    Khorasan Dough, page 176
    Einkorn Dough, page 178
    Sprouted Wheat Dough, page 180
    In most cases, these doughs make enough for 2 to 3 pizzas, depending on which pizza you are making.

    Page 48: Ice water measurement in cups should be 3/4 cup plus 3 tablespoons instead of 4 cups plus 2 tablespoons.

    Page 63, 64: Pan size should be 10 by 14-inches

    Page 149: The The Cal-italia pizza should be open and stretched rather than rolled. The third paragraph should read:

    "Sprinkle a wooden peel with the dusting mixture. Open the dough on the work surface to a 13-inch round with a slightly raised edge (see Opening and Stretching the Dough pages 31-33)."

    Disregard the fourth paragraph

    Page 187: Active dry yeast amount should be 2.3 grams

    Page 302: Starter amount for Chicago Deep-Dish Dough should be 0

    Kindle Version
    Location 4730 (Kindle): Water percentage should be 65 in Master Dough without Starter


  • #286 by amolapizza on 21 Aug 2020
  • Beh, some big ones there..  ???
  • #287 by Pizza_Not_War on 21 Aug 2020
  • I like his Master Dough with Starter. Great jumping off point for making a lasting cold ferment dough. With my own tweaks of course.
  • #288 by pizzaguy1958 on 27 Feb 2021
  • Tom,

    I’m new here but in response to Tony’s book, his sub-title is a little misleading.

    He is a pizza “twirling” champion.

    Jim
  • #289 by DoouBall on 28 Feb 2021
  • Tom,

    I’m new here but in response to Tony’s book, his sub-title is a little misleading.

    He is a pizza “twirling” champion.

    Jim

    Tony also won Best Pizza Margherita at the World Pizza Cup in Naples, Italy, and Best Pizza Romana at the World Championship of Pizza Makers in 2011. Here's a list of his awards:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tony_Gemignani#Titles
  • #290 by rossopizza on 05 May 2021
  • This whole Pizza Championship thing seems a bit dodgy to me, more self-promotion than culinary.  Just lurking here since I thought I would learn more from the Bible than is actually there. The recipes are all solid as far as I can tell, but not one represents a classic interpretation. Shouldn't be called a Bible in this case. I'm still getting over the time I wasted with Reinharts American Pie with recipes and techniques that are just not right.   At least both books spend time on the people and places that inspired them.
  • #291 by Pete-zza on 05 May 2021
  • I'm still getting over the time I wasted with Reinharts American Pie with recipes and techniques that are just not right.   At least both books spend time on the people and places that inspired them.
    rossopizza,

    At the time that I purchased the American Pie book, I thought that it was the best pizza book among those I looked at or purchased. I especially liked the historical aspects of the pizza business and how Peter laid it out organizationally. But as I grew as a pizza researcher I started to see some of the problems, at least in my opinion, with several of his pizza recipes. I perhaps attributed the problems to Peter having approached pizza from the bread making side.

    These days, to be fair, I think that Peter has gotten better over time with his recipes and related pizza advice, and I suspect that were he to write a pizza book today it would be a lot different, and much improved, over American Pie.

    Peter
  • #292 by parallei on 05 May 2021
  • ....... The recipes are all solid as far as I can tell, but not one represents a classic interpretation. .......

    You should get in touch with Tony and point him in the right direction. I'm sure he would more than appreciate your input.
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