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Author Topic: Sicilian pizza: Bottom looks done but pizza too soft and tastes floury  (Read 361 times)

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Offline Santo

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  • Location: New York, NY
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Hey guys. I made a sicilian pizza the other day. It kind of had a floury flavor like it may have been undercooked, but yet the bottom looked quite done to me. That's my problem. This was my formula, inspired by Craig's sicilian formula (Thank you for the amazing information you have shared with us here Craig if you are reading this).

Sicilian
 480g flour.  KABF
water 62%
olive oil  3%
sugar 2%
yeast 1%
salt  3%
ldmp  2%

I made the dough in the FP, using the pulse method. As soon as it became a smooth ball, I started stretching it gently in a generously oiled dark steel non stick pan. I stretched it in increments throughout the first 2 hours, waiting for the dough to relax in between. I let the dough rest in the covered pan for 5 hours. (I am always a fan of a same-day bake, for logistical reasons).

I baked it in the middle rack, pan on top of my pre-heated stone at 550 convection roast for 1 hour. Parbaked for only 5 minutes with small amount of sauce on the dough (Was this not long enough?) Then took it out and sauced it a little more heavily , and covered with about 8 oz WMLM Mozzarella. It baked up in about 8-9 minutes. I couldn't let it cook any longer or else the cheese would burn. The pizza sort of tasted too soft and had a floury or undercooked flavor to me, despite the bottom looking done to me. I think maybe i should have put the sauce on top so i could have let it all bake longer. But is that the answer and how much longer should i have baked it for? Is 550 a good temp for this pie? Should it be lower and for longer? I am aiming for NY Style Sicilian. Any feedback for my methods or outcomes? Here's some pics. Thanks.

I'm considering getting a Lloyd's sicilian 14x14 pan. Would this help me? I'm currently using a nonstick dark colored steel pan. I worry that this particular non stick somehow doesn't produce a very crispy crust, even though it looks pretty crispy in the pics. It is nice and dark but somehow is not crispy. Also considering doing a longer par bake or longer bake in general, with lower temp

Thanks so much.
.
« Last Edit: April 19, 2021, 10:21:06 PM by Santo »

Offline NYCpizzaintheUK

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  • Location: Bristol, England
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A friend of mine makes DSP and does so by part baking his dough, and then add the toppings and bake for a final time. He says the weight of cheese and sauce can ruin the cooking process if not part cooked first. Possible solution?

Offline megan45

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  • Location: Durham, nc
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I baked it in the middle rack, pan on top of my pre-heated stone at 550 convection roast for 1 hour. Parbaked for only 5 minutes with small amount of sauce on the dough (Was this not long enough?) Then took it out and sauced it a little more heavily , and covered with about 8 oz WMLM Mozzarella. It baked up in about 8-9 minutes. I couldn't let it cook any longer or else the cheese would burn. The pizza sort of tasted too soft and had a floury or undercooked flavor to me, despite the bottom looking done to me. I think maybe i should have put the sauce on top so i could have let it all bake longer. But is that the answer and how much longer should i have baked it for? Is 550 a good temp for this pie? Should it be lower and for longer? I am aiming for NY Style Sicilian. Any feedback for my methods or outcomes? Here's some pics. Thanks.

I'm considering getting a Lloyd's sicilian 14x14 pan. Would this help me? I'm currently using a nonstick dark colored steel pan. I worry that this particular non stick somehow doesn't produce a very crispy crust, even though it looks pretty crispy in the pics. It is nice and dark but somehow is not crispy. Also considering doing a longer par bake or longer bake in general, with lower temp

550° is high for Sicilian, especially on a preheated stone, and a 5 minute parbake is short. That's likely why the bottom looks done but lacks crispness and the inside of the crust tasted undercooked (because the bottom is baking/browning too fast and the interior isn't fully baked). Dropping the oven temperature to 400-450°, increasing your parbake to 8-12 minutes, and the final bake to 12-15minutes will allow the crust to bake through without burning the cheese. You might also experiment with ditching the stone. (For what it's worth, I don't use a stone, parbake 8-10 minutes at 425° on the middle rack; finish bake is 10-15 minutes, depending on the type(s) and weight of the toppings.)

I know some people swear by Lloyd pans, but I've yet to find an aluminum pan—even hard anodized—that performs nearly as well as a heavy steel pan. YMMV.

Offline Santo

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  • Location: New York, NY
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550° is high for Sicilian, especially on a preheated stone, and a 5 minute parbake is short. That's likely why the bottom looks done but lacks crispness and the inside of the crust tasted undercooked (because the bottom is baking/browning too fast and the interior isn't fully baked). Dropping the oven temperature to 400-450°, increasing your parbake to 8-12 minutes, and the final bake to 12-15minutes will allow the crust to bake through without burning the cheese. You might also experiment with ditching the stone. (For what it's worth, I don't use a stone, parbake 8-10 minutes at 425° on the middle rack; finish bake is 10-15 minutes, depending on the type(s) and weight of the toppings.)

I know some people swear by Lloyd pans, but I've yet to find an aluminum pan—even hard anodized—that performs nearly as well as a heavy steel pan. YMMV.

Thanks for your help Megan. What pan do you like to use?

Offline megan45

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  • Location: Durham, nc
  • I Love Pizza!

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