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Author Topic: Your wisdom is needed to get me started the right way with my new oven!  (Read 592 times)

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Offline Adanak50

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Good evening to all of you, I discovered this site about a week ago, and I realize I am perhaps lightyears away from pizza heaven... You people are amazing!

I recently purchased a woodfired oven (Clementi Family). It has taken me about three weeks to get to where it belongs (digging the area where the counter would be installed, making the counter, having a stainless top made etc.). I am about to have my first pizza cook in it, and having read countless posts here, I now feel lost. Would anyone be willing to share a recipe for neapolitan dough (with IDY or traditional commercial yeast) for about 4 12-in pizzas, along with fermentation times if applicable? I thought I would go with a poolish, but I am open to anything that will make this inauguration a success. Past this, I will continue exploring, for clearly pizza making is a universe on its own!

Thanks in advance for your kind help!

Sincerely,

Patrick

Offline mrs1986

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Good evening to all of you, I discovered this site about a week ago, and I realize I am perhaps lightyears away from pizza heaven... You people are amazing!

I recently purchased a woodfired oven (Clementi Family). It has taken me about three weeks to get to where it belongs (digging the area where the counter would be installed, making the counter, having a stainless top made etc.). I am about to have my first pizza cook in it, and having read countless posts here, I now feel lost. Would anyone be willing to share a recipe for neapolitan dough (with IDY or traditional commercial yeast) for about 4 12-in pizzas, along with fermentation times if applicable? I thought I would go with a poolish, but I am open to anything that will make this inauguration a success. Past this, I will continue exploring, for clearly pizza making is a universe on its own!

Thanks in advance for your kind help!

Sincerely,

Patrick

Hi Patrick,

I'm new to this too, but I would suggest start with your normal dough, I was over excited for my new oven and tried to make the best dough and it was a dissaster haha, maybe try with your regular dough and try to get the hang of the oven as first steps, it seems easy when you see the pizzaiolos but it's not THAT easy hehe.

Have good luck with you pizzas!

Offline Adanak50

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So I had to start somewhere to inaugurate my new oven. I was hoping to avoid a disaster, and also possibly (in the best scenario) to establish my own benchmark. It worked super well, for the pizza I made yesterday was my very best one so far.

I thought that detailing the process and ingredients here might help another newbie at least to get started. Also, I am hoping the wise ones here might chime in to make suggestions of minor modifications I could make to take my pizza game one step further on the way to Neapolitan pizza nirvana.

First, I need to mention three things: 1 I had no fresh yeast, so I used commercial pizza yeast; 2 I had no stand mixer, so I kneaded the dough by hand; 3 I went for a hydration level of about 62%. Many experts out there will cry when they see my recipe, so please bear with me as I learn. Feel free to make your recommendations! Here it is:

Yields 4 doughballs just about 260 gr each.

Step 1, poolish.
350 gr warm water
1 tsp honey
2.8 gr pizza yeast
Mix and let sit for 5 minutes
Add 350 grams of tipo 00 pizza flour and mix

Cover and put in fridge for 18 hrs

Step 2 make the dough
Add 91 gr water to poolish and mix
Add 350 gr of tipo 00 pizza flour a bit at a time as you mix
Add 20 gr sea salt
Add 15 gr olive oil
Knead for 20 to 30 minutes
Fold
Form one ball, place in container, cover and place in fridge for 4 hrs

Step 3 make the balls
Cut and weigh 260 gr balls
Oil flat pan or container
Lightly oil dough balls
Cover with plastic film and leave at room temperature for proofing, about 2 hrs.

Form pizza, bake and enjoy.

It is worth noting that the pizza was baked in a wood-fired oven at 450 degrees Celsius, in about 60 seconds.

Offline texmex

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It helps to see the end result in a photo, including the bottom, a cut shot of the cornicione, cheese melt, etc.


You say it was you best effort so far, (awesome) but you don't even describe the texture of the finished pizza.
Reesa

Offline HansB

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Would anyone be willing to share a recipe for neapolitan dough

If you want to make a Neapolitan pizza, forget poolish, honey, and oil. Authentic Neapolitan pizza is a direct dough made with flour, water, salt, and yeast.

This is the best place to start: https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=20477.0

All the best!
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Offline Adanak50

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Thanks for the link, Hans. I had already started reading this thread, but the ischia culture (is that the proper spelling?) was not available in the neighbourhood, so I decided to wait until I found some.

I needed to start somewhere as I said earlier, and now I can work on improving. As was pointed out, I did not include all the details in my post. As it was my first time working on the wood-fired oven, I had to try to get used to the pace, which was super quick as it only took 60 seconds to bake the pizzas. Hence I have no pictures, like a real barbarian. Hahaha. They were so good that they were literally gulped down (not sure if anyne else actually chewed on them but me). They had even leoparding on the cornicione and the bottom, but please take this description for what it is--the newbie's opinion based on much past experience on a kamado grill, not a WF oven. As for the cheese, it was all completely melted.

I really need to work on my peel manipulation when I put the uncooked pizza in the oven. That was a challenge.

Patrick

Offline HansB

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Thanks for the link, Hans. I had already started reading this thread, but the ischia culture (is that the proper spelling?) was not available in the neighbourhood, so I decided to wait until I found some.

I needed to start somewhere as I said earlier, and now I can work on improving. As was pointed out, I did not include all the details in my post. As it was my first time working on the wood-fired oven, I had to try to get used to the pace, which was super quick as it only took 60 seconds to bake the pizzas. Hence I have no pictures, like a real barbarian. Hahaha. They were so good that they were literally gulped down (not sure if anyne else actually chewed on them but me). They had even leoparding on the cornicione and the bottom, but please take this description for what it is--the newbie's opinion based on much past experience on a kamado grill, not a WF oven. As for the cheese, it was all completely melted.

I really need to work on my peel manipulation when I put the uncooked pizza in the oven. That was a challenge.

Patrick

You don't need to use Ischia starter, just use IDY. You mentioned Pizza Yeast, I have never heard of that?
Instagram @hans_michigan

Offline Adanak50

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Hans, this is most interesting. If I replace the ischia starter with IDY, should I go with about 50% of the recommended quantity of the ischia starter?

I realize many things as I go along here. As I eagerly looked for a first recipe and read, read and read, as well as watched dozens of youtube videos, I ended up combining theories. You are totally right. Poolish has nothing to do with authentic Neapolitan dough. The expression I should use is wood-fired oven dough. All this means, I guess, is higher hydration than standard oven dough. Poolish amd biga were just part of my research on fermented dough.

Locally, the main brand of commercial yeast we find in grocery stores is Fleischmann's. They have traditional, pizza, bread machine and active dry yeast. My guess is that IDY corresponds either to what they call pizza yeast, or else active dry. I will run tests and share the results here when I do.

As the first try was more than conclusive (I had told my kids in a tongue-in-cheek fashion that if the first recipe was bad, we were ordering restaurant pizza...), I can now proceed with more tests. I sure appreciate the direct dough concept. Less time to make than poolish. My next batch will be of that type if I can figure out the quantity of IDY.

Cheers!

Patrick

Offline cagalindo

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Use the Ooni or PizzApp+ for ingredient quantities.

24 HR RT Neapolitan Pizza w/ IDY
Preparation Steps
1) Mix all dry ingredients (flour type 00 Italian, instant yeast, fine kosher salt)
2) Add the water* and knead by hand for ~10-15 minutes, see video below to "know" when it's ready
3) Place in an airtight container for bulk fermentation at room temperature for 20 hours (I use a covered 12 quart Cambro / Rubbermaid container)
4) About 4 hours before cooking, remove from bulk container and divide into balls, see videos below for technique
5) Place each ball individually in an airtight container at room temperature until ready to use (I prefer round meal prep containers, one ball in each one)
6) When you're ready, flip the container upside down on a table and let the dough ball come out naturally (may have to hit it a few times)

*For room temperatures below 50F or above 85F I do recommend adjusting your water temperature. This is in fahrenheit. Add ice, or heat it up, to reach the desired water temperature before you mix it in with the flour.

FORMULA: 225 - (Room Temperature) - (Flour Temperature) - 5 = Desired Water Temperature

Additional Information
- Always use a precise food scale to measure out your ingredients
- For cooking my ideal temperature of the oven floor is around ~850F, and make sure you have real flames/fire not just a hot oven
- Beginners, try using a lower hydration of 60% so it's easier to handle and a dough ball weight of 280g which gives you more dough to stretch, this is configured in the Ooni/PizzApp+
- I find it very helpful to put each ball individually into a round 28oz container for the last 4 hours of proofing, not all together in a tray because they stick together, and the round shape of the container helps a lot
- A wooden pizza peel is a game-changer, helps so your pizza doesn't stick and you can easily launch it into the oven at the start, I also build my pizzas directly on the wooden peel
https://youtu.be/v5t5MEZt6LM?t=1
https://youtu.be/bxbY8pWCKsM?t=91
https://youtu.be/nXO2T9rXGEI?t=532
https://youtu.be/imaIOZoUpHs?t=1
https://youtu.be/AmCRtCHPfyI?t=1
« Last Edit: April 30, 2021, 02:37:49 PM by cagalindo »

Offline Adanak50

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Cagalindo, this is what I would call a wealth of information! I have just downloaded the Ooni app and I am impressed already. I will be sure to download the other app you recommend, as well as check out all of your links. Many, many thanks to you!

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Offline 02ebz06

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You mentioned Pizza Yeast, I have never heard of that?

I've seen the packets of it in the grocery store.
Not sure how it is different from other yeasts though.
Bruce here... My cooking toys --> FGM 800-B Pizza Oven, Pellet Grill, Pellet Smoker, Propane Griddle, Propane Grill

Offline Adanak50

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Hi everyone,

So here I am preparing for my second pizza cook based on your wise words and sound advice. I have tried to take a more authentic Neapolitan twist (yes, my first batch of dough was a success in my own standards, but as it included a poolish, it was not Neapolitan! :-) . I am now going for a direct dough with 63% hydration, only with salt and pizza yeast. It will be at room temp for 18 hours. I must say that I am impressed with how small a quantity of yeast this recipe takes (0.4 g!). I hope it works, so I am keeping my fingers crossed. I will know tonight!

Sincerely,

Patrick

Offline Adanak50

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Here is my latest update! The Neapolitan dough was excellent. Crispy on the outside, with even leoparding under the pizza and on the cornicione, and tender inside. Cooked again in about 60 seconds. My next experiments will be with longer and/or cold fermentation, and with a different kind of yeast. Thanks again for your help in making my first tries so successful!


Patrick

Offline QwertyJuan

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Here is my latest update! The Neapolitan dough was excellent. Crispy on the outside, with even leoparding under the pizza and on the cornicione, and tender inside. Cooked again in about 60 seconds. My next experiments will be with longer and/or cold fermentation, and with a different kind of yeast. Thanks again for your help in making my first tries so successful!


Patrick

Post some pics... we would love to see them!!

Offline Adanak50

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Qwerty Juan, you are SOOOOO right! And like a fishing story, I have no pictures for support. As this was my second pizza cook in the wood-fired oven, I started developing a system to adjust to the fast pace of the cooking. I was better than the first time, but not fully there yet. :-) . Add to this that my two kids are the ravenous pre-teen type, and you will see why I did not have a second to break out the camera before the pizzas were gulped down. I guess part of the quality test is exactly this, the speed at which they ate, and in silence for that matter (otherwise I would have heard the complaints, trust me!). Hahaha

So here is my objective for my third cook: test a different type of yeast, test cold fermentation, and by all means, take a few pictures. :-)

Sincerely,

Patrick

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Offline texmex

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Qwerty Juan, you are SOOOOO right! And like a fishing story, I have no pictures for support. As this was my second pizza cook in the wood-fired oven, I started developing a system to adjust to the fast pace of the cooking. I was better than the first time, but not fully there yet. :-) . Add to this that my two kids are the ravenous pre-teen type, and you will see why I did not have a second to break out the camera before the pizzas were gulped down. I guess part of the quality test is exactly this, the speed at which they ate, and in silence for that matter (otherwise I would have heard the complaints, trust me!). Hahaha

So here is my objective for my third cook: test a different type of yeast, test cold fermentation, and by all means, take a few pictures. :-)

Sincerely,

Patrick


You gotta train the teens right.
Tell them they must get photos in trade for their meal. Get clear pics of the pie in the oven, right out of the oven, show the bottom crust, show a cross section of the cornicione after slicing. Now you may eat. Before you know it they will get excited about who is getting the best pics of the prettiest pies you produce.
Reesa

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