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Author Topic: Dough Was Not Controllable  (Read 178 times)

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Offline Bbqguy

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Dough Was Not Controllable
« on: May 02, 2021, 10:02:56 AM »
Yesterday I made a NY style using this dough formula I got from the late Tom Lehman:


 263 grams 100% High gluten flour (50/50 mix of bread and Caputo Chefs)
166 grams 63%Water (try to get temp of 70-75)
4 grams 3%  Salt
2.63-5.26 grams 1%-2% Sugar (only if cold fermenting more than 3 days)
2.5 grams  (1/2 teaspoon) Olive oil
1 gram 0.4%  Instant dry yeast

Standard Dough Making Procedure: Put water into the mixing bowl, add the salt and sugar, then add the flour and the yeast. Mix at low speed for about 2 minutes, then mix at medium speed until all of the flour has been picked up into the dough. Now add the oil and mix in for 2 minutes at low speed, then mix the dough at medium speed until it develops a smooth, satiny appearance (generally about 8 to 10 minutes using a planetary mixer).

The dough temperature should be between 75-80F. Immediately divide the dough into desired weight pieces and round into balls. Wipe the dough balls with salad oil, and place into containers.  Place uncovered dough in the cooler for 2 hours as this will allow the dough balls to cool down thoroughly, and uniformly. The dough can then be covered. This will prevent excessive drying of the dough balls.

Allow to CF for 18 hours minimum and  up to 72 hours. To use the dough balls, remove a quantity from the cooler and allow them to reach 55-60F before using. Unused dough can remain at room temperature (covered to prevent drying) for up to 6 hours after removal from the cooler.

I have made this dough many time and it was always very easy to work with. Yesteday however while it opened ok it seemed to be noticeably softer, so much so that I couldnít really get it to shape to well. I am still learning and developing my stretching and shaping skills and can usually produce a fairly round pizza i couldnít get this one round. The only change from the recipe and workflow with this batch and the recipe is the dough was in the fridge for 4 days rather than 2-3 and I used Caputo Pizzeria flour in place of the Chefís. It sat at room temp of 73F for almost 3 hours before opening it up. Could any of these changes have caused the issue?
I started out with nothing. I have most of it left.

Offline wb54885

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Re: Dough Was Not Controllable
« Reply #1 on: May 02, 2021, 10:36:45 AM »
It looks like Pizzeria has a lower protein content than Chefís, so that initial difference in dough strength combined with the dough having 1.5-2x longer to relax in the fridge could have made for a softer, more extensible dough at the time of use.
Every oven is a law unto itself and only itself.

Offline Pizza_Not_War

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Re: Dough Was Not Controllable
« Reply #2 on: May 02, 2021, 10:37:05 AM »
Any change in variables can give you the different results. Try to only change one thing each batch and take notes.

Offline Bbqguy

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Re: Dough Was Not Controllable
« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2021, 11:03:12 AM »
It looks like Pizzeria has a lower protein content than Chefís, so that initial difference in dough strength combined with the dough having 1.5-2x longer to relax in the fridge could have made for a softer, more extensible dough at the time of use.

Thanks WB. I hadnít considered the difference in protein content but it makes sense
I started out with nothing. I have most of it left.

Offline wb54885

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Re: Dough Was Not Controllable
« Reply #4 on: May 02, 2021, 11:49:06 AM »
Even the same line of flour can vary from bag to bag in its characteristics.

PNWís advice is solid:  until you feel comfortable handling a wide range of doughs at different hydrations and states of relaxation, itís much safer to make incremental changes to your formulas and processes one variable at a time. And itís especially important if you really want to understand the specific effect a single change will have. If you want to extend your cold fermentation time for extra flavor, sticking with higher protein flours is a good idea to start with.
« Last Edit: May 02, 2021, 11:58:02 AM by wb54885 »
Every oven is a law unto itself and only itself.

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Offline Bbqguy

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Re: Dough Was Not Controllable
« Reply #5 on: May 02, 2021, 01:12:18 PM »
Thank you Pizza and WB. These are very good and logical tips. In spite of the issues with the shaping and extensibility the flavor was fantastic. Even she who must be obeyed said it was the best one so far.
I started out with nothing. I have most of it left.

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