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Author Topic: Calling All FGM Owners in New England  (Read 1709 times)

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Offline wasitim

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Calling All FGM Owners in New England
« on: September 11, 2015, 03:12:21 PM »
Hey folks,

Building an outdoor kitchen at the moment, and a 950b is most likely getting installed. We're planning on an adobe igloo style finish.

We're on Cape Cod so our temps are usually a 'bit' more temperate than the rest of NE, but, we get plenty of cold winters.

My last concern on the purchase is how well they function in the middle of a cold snowy winter. Can some of you share your experiences, please? Any particular thoughts on the igloo finish? Antoine says my concerns are not an issue and it's guaranteed for our area, but, I'm just looking for some feedback from folks who have the 950b or similar.

Thanks for any and all help.

Offline stonecutter

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Re: Calling All FGM Owners in New England
« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2015, 04:23:06 PM »
Water intrusion  is the death of any masonry...that's the key.  Keep out the water. Additionally in winter operation, be more gradual with how you fire your oven.  The colder it is, the slower you should bring the oven up to temperature. Be patient.
When we build, let us think that we build forever.
John Ruskin

Offline JConk007

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Re: Calling All FGM Owners in New England
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2015, 11:39:17 PM »
Member RickM has a 950 in NJ his Christmas Parties are epic !  ;D
john
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Offline Tampa

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Re: Calling All FGM Owners in New England
« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2015, 08:29:01 AM »
Water intrusion  is the death of any masonry...that's the key.  Keep out the water. Additionally in winter operation, be more gradual with how you fire your oven.  The colder it is, the slower you should bring the oven up to temperature. Be patient.
stonecutter,

I noticed a wet baking surface (firebrick) in my neighbor's WFO yesterday.  I'm guessing the cause is heavy rains coming through the chimney.  Is this an issue, or not to worry?

Thanks

Dave

Offline Tommy G

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Re: Calling All FGM Owners in New England
« Reply #4 on: September 13, 2015, 06:35:50 PM »
Water is only a real problem in the winter with freeze/thaw cycle. If there is a crack in the outer dome leaking into the inner dome that would be a problem also but water on the cooking surface leaking from the chimney is not a big problem. I would suggest putting a cap on the chimney!

Tom

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Offline stonecutter

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Re: Calling All FGM Owners in New England
« Reply #5 on: September 13, 2015, 10:42:15 PM »
Water is only a real problem in the winter with freeze/thaw cycle. If there is a crack in the outer dome leaking into the inner dome that would be a problem also but water on the cooking surface leaking from the chimney is not a big problem. I would suggest putting a cap on the chimney!

Tom

No, water intrusion in masonry is always a problem.
When we build, let us think that we build forever.
John Ruskin

Offline Tampa

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Re: Calling All FGM Owners in New England
« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2015, 07:55:33 AM »
Water is only a real problem in the winter with freeze/thaw cycle. If there is a crack in the outer dome leaking into the inner dome that would be a problem also but water on the cooking surface leaking from the chimney is not a big problem. I would suggest putting a cap on the chimney!
Tom

No, water intrusion in masonry is always a problem.

Thanks Tom, and Stonecutter

I thought about the freeze/thaw cycle which is less of a problem in FL.  I also remember the words of a local builder friend "I know two things about cement-based products: they are gray and they crack".  I'm guessing that another couple of issues are steam expands (a lot) creating more cracks, and moisture in insulation can't be a good thing.

Is there anything else?

Dave

Offline Tommy G

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Re: Calling All FGM Owners in New England
« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2015, 05:57:40 PM »
Stonecutter,

If you read my post carefully.........I never said water was not a problem!

Offline wasitim

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Re: Calling All FGM Owners in New England
« Reply #8 on: September 15, 2015, 07:31:27 AM »
Thanks folks.

Are there any more members in New England that can share their WFO experiences (hopefully FGM but all welcomed)?

Hoping to find some folks that have an igloo style finish.

Offline breadstoneovens

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Re: Calling All FGM Owners in New England
« Reply #9 on: September 15, 2015, 07:30:49 PM »
Just to share a few things, but a lot more can be said.

Yes, water in masonry and more particularly in a brick oven is not a good thing. Unless you are baking bread and you have a little pan of water for steam  :-D

There are many things that can be done to prevent water getting into the oven and to prevent damage if the oven was to get wet. Some are specific to the design of the oven, for example on our ovens, FGM /BSO:
- We only use Calcium Silicate boards as they don't absorb water like ceramic fiber boards or vermiculite/perlite. Also the Cal Sil boards won't deteriorate and compress under the weight of the oven as they dry
- Per the instruction, the oven is to be installed a minimum of 3"above the front shelf to prevent water, from rain or melting snow, back flowing into the ovens. Never make the front shelf flush with the floor of the oven. Attached are a couple of picture showing what I mean.
- The cast iron door cover the entire entry arch and come down 1/2" bellow the oven landing to prevent rain water getting into the oven
- Should your oven actually get wet the floor tiles can be removed, since the dome doesn't seat on the floor. It will help the oven to dry faster and a tiles is damaged it can be replaced easily

Others are just good practices like using proper proper chimney and chimney cap.
Or if the stone work design chosen may not be water proof, it is best to do a good stucco dome and then the stone work. Picture attached.

Now when it comes to cold weather Stonecutter said it, take easy at first, a small fire fore hour or so to break out the cold and bring it to 100 F. After that the oven doesn't care.
How ever there is limitation to what a wood fired oven enthusiast individual is willing to deal with in terms of cold!
WFO cooking is about passion.

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Offline stonecutter

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Re: Calling All FGM Owners in New England
« Reply #10 on: September 16, 2015, 05:47:35 AM »
Stonecutter,

If you read my post carefully.........I never said water was not a problem!

Right, but you had said "only a real problem in winter during freeze/thaw" and "water on the cooking surface leaking from the chimney is not a big problem."

I can assure you, water intrusion is always a problem with masonry....period.
When we build, let us think that we build forever.
John Ruskin

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