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Offline tscaife

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Wild Yeast
« on: May 18, 2017, 03:29:23 PM »
Hello!

I recently captured wild yeast at my home and wanted to experiment with making some New York(ish) style pies. I used an ischia starter for years but, managed to kill it and decided to give this a shot. I used the method from the book Tartine Bread to grow a new starter. It basically consisted of mixing flour and water and feeding daily until the yeast reached an active level. It took about three weeks but, I am finally there. I plan to try several different experiments but will start with a standard room temperature rise tonight baking the pies tomorrow.


Flour - 100% (All Trumps unbleached/unbromated)
Water - 63%
Oil 1%
salt - 2%
Starter - 2%
Single ball - 375 grams

Will do a bulk rise for three hours and balled for 20 - 21 hrs. I will then bake them in my home oven on a corderite kiln shelf.

I'll post pics tomorrow and will also report on how good or bad it goes with the wild yeast. My guess is that it won't perform as well as the ischia but, we will see.


« Last Edit: May 18, 2017, 03:35:39 PM by tscaife »

Offline Randy

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Re: Wild Yeast
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2017, 04:09:59 PM »
I use the yeast that comes on my grapes that I grow to make wine sometimes.  There is a difference in the wine made with wild yeast flavor as compared to a processed wine yeast. 

Good luck.  I think you will find the flavor interesting.

Offline tscaife

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Re: Wild Yeast
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2017, 07:38:49 PM »
Came out great! I expected it to perform poorly compared to ischia but, it was equal. Only change would be to add Browning agent of some sort.

Offline tscaife

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Re: Wild Yeast
« Reply #3 on: May 26, 2017, 07:45:44 PM »
I am going to take another run at this and wanted to add some sort of Browning agent. I ordered diastatic malt powder that has a litner rating of 210. I planned to use .4 or .5%. However after some research on this forum it seems that it isn't well suited for a 24 hour rise. Would sugar (1% or so?) be a better option? Formula will be same as above with all trumps unbleached/ unbromated high gluten flour.

Thanks in advance for any info.

TS
« Last Edit: May 26, 2017, 07:49:16 PM by tscaife »

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Wild Yeast
« Reply #4 on: May 26, 2017, 09:22:30 PM »
Perhaps your problem is more related to heat distribution rather than dough ingredients. The bottom of your pies seem to be browning OK so may you need to play around with adjusting heat to different parts of the pie so all parts are done at the same time. I do a similar NY(ish) pizza with wild starter and it took it me a lot of tries before I dialed in the right conditions for my particular oven.

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Offline tscaife

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Re: Wild Yeast
« Reply #5 on: May 27, 2017, 07:40:13 AM »
Thanks Bill! Interesting thought. Did you move the pies higher? Did you use broiler?

My oven goes to a temp of 550. I also turn it 180 degrees halfway though.

I'll play around a bit and see what I can come up with.

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Wild Yeast
« Reply #6 on: May 27, 2017, 08:10:27 AM »
I've got a steel on top of a stone on the lowest rack. Oven temp is 550F in "stone" mode (never been able to figure exactly how that differs from full convection).

My dough is 250g which I form into a 14" crust (that is the depth of the steel) so I think I may be working with a thinner crust than you. I don't like overcooked (and undercooked) crust. In this scenario, the crust is always just cooked before the toppings, so I hit the top of the pizza with a Searzall torch to finish any spots that need it - much better control than the broiler.



 

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