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Author Topic: Newbie's first dough  (Read 214 times)

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Offline old_dood

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Newbie's first dough
« on: September 14, 2021, 11:51:42 AM »
actually my second.  First was so wet I gave up.

For the second I went to https://mypizzacorner.com/pizza-school/ and used the relevant techniques shown in the videos for dough making, rising, and balling.  I also used his calculator for dough ingredients.  I decided to try a much lower hydration (58%) than in the first attempt.  For the amount of dough I made his calculator indicated .1g of ADY.  I was very apprehensive about such a small quantity.  Fortunately I have access to a very accurate lab grade scale and used the stated amount.  After 24 hours at 75 degree room temp. the dough easily doubled in size.

I was a little surprised at the amount of stickiness since I didn't experience any of that when kneading.  Now waiting 4-6 hours before making the pizza.  I used Caputo Chefs dough and will be attempting Neopolitan style in 500 degree convection oven with a stone and with the possibility of also using the broiler  I've read all about the limitations of home ovens.

would appreciate any comments.

Offline foreplease

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Re: Newbie's first dough
« Reply #1 on: September 14, 2021, 07:41:05 PM »
First dough sounds promising. Looking forward to the first pictures. Welcome to the forum.
-Tony

Offline Rolls

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Re: Newbie's first dough
« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2021, 08:35:46 PM »
It's good that you're using a scale and measuring out your ingredients by weight rather than volume.  This will lead to more consistency and repeatability in your bakes.  Having said that, as you gain more experience, you will also develop a better intuition for how your dough is developing, which is as useful as empirical measurements.  Experience is always the greatest teacher.

Lowering the hydration to 58% will certainly produce a more manageable dough which is what you want as a novice pizza maker.  Fooling around with hard-to-handle high hydration dough can quickly turn you off from the hobby.  For the type of pizza you are trying to make, which sounds like a New York/Naples style hybrid, 58% hydration should work fine. Re-balling the dough after the fermentation period will increase its surface tension and should eliminate any stickiness.  Be sure to let the dough balls rest sufficiently before attempting to stretch into discs.

Also looking forward to seeing your results.


Rolls

Parmigiano-Reggiano doesn't come in a green box!   - Chef Jean-Pierre

Offline old_dood

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Re: Newbie's first dough
« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2021, 11:49:33 PM »
trying to post pic but I can't.  I've cropped and resized (less than 100k), format is correct, am able to select file in the "choose file" dialog but it never shows up underneath.  I've searched the procedure.  what am I doing wrong?

Offline old_dood

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Re: Newbie's first dough
« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2021, 11:54:33 PM »
oops, I guess I did it correctly.  anyway, dough crust was a little tough.  I don't think I should've used the broiler.  I cooked without cheese on convection until crust started to brown, took out, added cheese and switched to broil.  Next dough I won't broil and will try putting some olive oil on the crust when I add the cheese.

getting psyched up to buy an Ooni Koda 16.

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