A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Author Topic: Obsauced venture into Pizza al Taglio  (Read 740 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 26995
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Obsauced venture into Pizza al Taglio
« Reply #20 on: January 18, 2018, 12:02:23 PM »
I don't know why we use oz/in^2 as the unit for TF when we pretty much always work in grams. Just an industry legacy I guess. That and we usually measure the dimensions in inches.

Really, g/in^2 would be the most intuitive.
Craig,

I think it is a legacy matter. Where I first saw regular discussion of dough loading (which I renamed thickness factor for my own purposes), it was over at the PMQ Think Tank where Tom Lehmann regularly posted and who often talked about dough loading. Since the people who mainly visited the Think Tank were professional pizza makers, I think that working in ounces fit them better than grams. Also, they were used to working with 50 pounds of flour so ounces made more sense than grams.

Peter

Offline TXCraig1

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 23228
  • Location: Houston, TX
  • Pizza is not bread.
    • Craig's Neapolitan Garage
Re: Obsauced venture into Pizza al Taglio
« Reply #21 on: January 18, 2018, 12:24:34 PM »
Craig, I tried to figure out the math for g/in^2 (since that is most intuitive for me) earlier and my brain near exploded.

I usually just add the step of dividing my grams by 28.3495 to go to ounces and it's fairly fast but....

Any help?

That's pretty much it. Divide the TF by 28.35 to go g/in^2 --> oz/in^2 or multiply by the same to go oz/in^2 --> g/in^2.

Likewise, multiply by 4.394 to go from oz/in^2 --> g/cm^2 or divide by the same to go the other direction.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

A D V E R T I S E M E N T