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Author Topic: DSP whole wheat flour mix  (Read 958 times)

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Offline quixoteQ

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DSP whole wheat flour mix
« on: February 26, 2024, 08:51:29 AM »
Hey DSPers.  Iím traveling, and I find myself in need of flour substitutions.  My usual recipe, a 48hCF, uses 70-73% hydration (no oil) with a 90/10 balance of KABF and semolina.  I use a 10x14 lloyd and a 520g dough ball.  Bakes are usually 15-17 minutes at 490-500F.

While traveling, I only have access to GMAP.  My attempt using the all purpose flour with a 70% hydration was too pillowy. I like an airy crumb and this one looked the way I wanted it, but it had no texture at all.

Iíve managed to get my hands on some whole wheat flour (though I sadly donít know the brand).  Does anyone have any tips for blending AP with whole wheat, a blend that might work similarly to my 90/10 KABF/semolina blend?  Much appreciated!
Josh

Offline PapaJawnz

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Re: DSP whole wheat flour mix
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2024, 09:01:49 AM »
I personally wouldn't use the whole wheat flour for detroit style pizza, it likely make the crust more dense, if that's what you're after?  Can you get your hands on some vital wheat gluten?  That seems like the best way to travel and improve upon the protein content all purpose or bread flours.
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Offline quixoteQ

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Re: DSP whole wheat flour mix
« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2024, 09:29:01 AM »
Can you get your hands on some vital wheat gluten?
Sadly I canít!  Iím on an island with limited grocery options.  The whole wheat flour comes from a kind neighbor.  I did see some cornmeal at the grocery and almost pulled the trigger on that as a sub for semolina, but, you know, I didnít do that.
Josh

Online foreplease

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Re: DSP whole wheat flour mix
« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2024, 11:39:39 PM »
I have made several DSPs we thought were good using General Mills UBAP at 70% HR with a couple stretch and folds. I liked how light they were. For structure in the pizza you put on the table, some or all of it being BF is easier. I do it both ways.


Given your circumstances, I think I would add a couple stretch and folds and stick with the AP. Iím not a big fan of -meaning I do not trust myself - with par-baking but I think it is something you should try on a couple AP DS while you are on the island, stretch and fold the dough in bulk, then divide and begin working it out to to the edges of you pans. with a light coat of sauce. Complete this minutes before you intend to complete each pizza and finish the base. I think in this instance it would be a good thing for you to try. Hope this helps and that the pizzas turn out well.
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Offline Dangerous Salumi

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Re: DSP whole wheat flour mix
« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2024, 07:12:51 AM »
Have you tried an extended kneed with a mixer to develop the gluten as much as possible in your AP flour?
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Offline quixoteQ

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Re: DSP whole wheat flour mix
« Reply #5 on: February 27, 2024, 07:18:22 AM »
Iím not a big fan of -meaning I do not trust myself - with par-baking but I think it is something you should try on a couple AP DS while you are on the island, stretch and fold the dough in bulk, then divide and begin working it out to to the edges of you pans. with a light coat of sauce. Complete this minutes before you intend to complete each pizza

Thank you!

So Iíve read that some people use parbaking in restaurant settings in order to avoid waste and also to make it easier on staff who arenít as familiar with the dough.  Iíve also seen some photos of parbaking that show some beautiful fried cheese edges.  But Iím not sure how parbake without drying out my dough.

When making my own DSPs, I usually do a series of early mixes, and stretch and folds (depending on whether Iím hand mixing or using a machine).  After resting in bulk, Iíll ball (if making more than one), then CF.  A few hours before I plan to bake, I remove from CF and pan, rest for 30m, then complete the panning if necessary.  They warm and finish proofing in the pans until Iím ready to dress the pizzas.

So, youíre recommending I ball and pan immediately before I parbake? 

And, I should top with a light sauce before parbaking?

Then, should I let them cool before topping and finishing the bake?

I appreciate your help - thanks again!

Josh
Josh

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Re: DSP whole wheat flour mix
« Reply #6 on: February 28, 2024, 12:23:24 AM »
Yes., I am suggesting your last 4 sentences may help in your situation. In step 3 you should probably vent them-remove from pan to a cooling rack for 2-5 minutes. Your cheese and toppings will help rehydrate your dough, not to mention more sauce on top. This is my opinion based on your special circumstances. I hope it helps and that we both learn. Something. Good luck!
-Tony

Offline quixoteQ

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Re: DSP whole wheat flour mix
« Reply #7 on: February 28, 2024, 09:10:16 AM »
Quote
Yes., I am suggesting your last 4 sentences may help in your situation. In step 3 you should probably vent them-remove from pan to a cooling rack for 2-5 minutes. Your cheese and toppings will help rehydrate your dough, not to mention more sauce on top. This is my opinion based on your special circumstances. I hope it helps and that we both learn. Something. Good luck!

Thanks again, much appreciated
Josh

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