Pizza Making Forum

Pizza Making => Chicago Style => Topic started by: loowaters on April 22, 2007, 03:49:55 PM

Title: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: loowaters on April 22, 2007, 03:49:55 PM
I haven't made this in some time and revisted it this weekend.  It's a modification of this recipe http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,2620.0.html

I've tinkered with this by dropping the hydration to as low as 45% (like my Malnati's) but I've found a nice hydration level at 49%, probably because there are more dry ingredients to absorb the additional water (cream of tartar, sugar).  That one percent difference from Foodblogger's original recipe doesn't sound like much but it just makes it easier for the dough to keep form once in the pan, rather than drooping on the sides.  I've also eliminated salt from the recipe as the ingredient listing at the Gino's mail order website indicates there is none.

I made two pies, a 14" and the 12" pictured.  The 12" is half pepperoni, half chunk sweet italian sausage and fresh, thinly sliced garlic.  It's been topped with (a little too much) grated parm.

Back to the setup.  I've always had fits with the dough sliding around using oil in the pan, that's one of the reason I use Crisco for my Malnati's recipe.  I had just a little Crisco left in my small tub and decided to whisk it with EV olive oil.  I greased up the bottom of the pans with that mixture.  It made a nice paste and gave me just what I was looking for, olive oil taste without the slipping and sliding from just using the oil.

The first pie to go in was the 14" that was quartered up with different ingredients to satify different members of the family.  That was done in my 14 x 2 black, hardcoat pan. Cooked at 475* for 20 mins. on the middle rack of my oven and came out beautifully.

The second one was the 12" cooked in the shiny aluminum pan.  I've never used this pan without placing it on the stone...until this time.  It received an additional 5 mins. in the oven (25 total) and the results were not good.  The only reason that I have just one pic is because seconds after the picture was taken, the pie was virtually mutilated removing it from the pan.  WOW!  The bottom was just....bready.  Not doughy, bready, like soft white bread.  BAD!  I've never experienced what some of you already have.  I never really bought into exactly how bad it was but the reflective power of this pan, in a side by side with the pie I had just made that turned out perfect, was a pie killer.  I guess because it had always been in contact with the stone it wasn't as much of an issue.  Now without it...HMMM?  Well, I can't have that again so this pan is gone and a stop at my restaurant supply store is now in order for a 12" hardcoat anodized pan.  A lot more credit goes to the pan than I ever thought.  The pan ruined a good pie.  I reheated leftovers stovetop on a skillet and it tasted just fine once I crisped up the bottom.

Also, big thanks to whomever suggested (I think it was Randy but I can't find it) using the Wal-Mart house label crushed tomatoes.  I needed them for the 12" pie as an emergency (I had them on hand just for this purpose) after needing more Centos for my 14" than anticipated.  They are surprisingly good and I'm sure I'll use them again.

Here's the entire recipe that I followed:

Gino's East

100% AP Flour
49 water
16 corn oil
2 evoo
2 sugar
1 cream of tartar
.75 yellow food coloring
.75 IDY

Thickness factor of .13

1)  Dissolve yellow food coloring in water.
2)  Add half of the flour and the yeast.
3)  Stir until mixed.
4)  Cover bowl with plastic wrap.  Let sit for 20 minutes.
5)  Add the rest of the ingredients and stir until combined.
6)  Shape into a ball
7)  Place dough ball in a gallon ziplock bag and let proof in the fridge for 48 hours.

Again, big props to Foodblogger on this recipe.  I've adjusted it just a touch.

Loo
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: BTB on April 23, 2007, 12:10:16 PM
This past weekend I, too, made two deep dish pizzas.  I was going to make one Malnati style, and since my son's favorite is Gino's East, I attempted to make one in the Gino's East style.  The dough for the Gino's East pizza, however, did not come out well at all and I ended up making a second Malnati's style dough ball instead. 

I'm not certain what happened but the Gino's East dough was so extremely sticky that I couldn't get it off my fingers or the bowl very well, nor form a dough ball easily. Here was my Gino's East recipe:

     Flour  100% (50% KAAP, 50% KABF)
     Water  50%
     ADY  .70%
     Salt  .80%
     Ex. V. Olive Oil  2.75%
     Corn Oil  15%
     Sugar  2%
     Cream of Tartar  .85%
     Yellow Food Coloring  1/4 tsp

Some of the Gino's East recipes had bread flour and some did not, so I (maybe foolishly) did half and half.  After kneading for a few minutes and making a mess out of it all, I managed to put it into a zip lock bag and into the refrigerator.  It was so messy and sticky (even after adding some additional flour), however, that I decided not to use it and quickly made another Malnati style dough ball, which turned out much better (i.e., not sticky and messy).  I am perplexed on what happened and figure that I must have goofed on the measurements or something (I had just bought a new digital scale).  And I didn't follow a 2 step procedure like you did but instead just mixed all the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients.  I don't know if that could have brought about the poor result that I had.

The Malnati recipe that I used was I think close to one of yours:

     Flour  100%  (KAAP)
     Water  47%
     Corn Oil  18%
     Reg. Olive Oil  3.5%
     ADY  .5%

After Kneading for only about a minute or less and 24 hours in the refrigerator, I baked the two Malnati style deep dishes at 450 degrees on the bottom shelf for about 25 minutes.  I had two different pans:  one an Ekco Baker's Secret Air Insulated pan (dark gray colored - NOT teflon) that I have very successfully used before; the other was one that I used for the first time - a heavy Cuisinart pan with a very dark exterior but a dull silver-like interior (my wife found it on a super sale somewhere).  While both of the Malnati's pizzas turned out pretty good, I was surprised to see that the new Cuisinart with it's silver interior actually performed a little better making the crust a little more golden brown than the Baker's Secret.  There was one more important  difference, however.  I usually put Crisco in the pan, so this time I did the Baker's Secret pan with Crisco and the Cuisinart with olive oil to see the difference.  My wife and son preferred the one with the olive oil, but I had a slight, but not significant, preference for the one made with Crisco. 

While we enjoyed the pizzas very much, I am still looking for a more tastier and especially flakier crust that I seem to remember from my many times eating at Lou Malnati's Lincolnwood restaurant.  But I'm getting close.
     

         
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: chiguy on April 23, 2007, 12:41:49 PM
I'm not certain what happened but the Gino's East dough was so extremely sticky that I couldn't get it off my fingers or the bowl very well, nor form a dough ball easily. Here was my Gino's East recipe:

     Flour  100% (50% KAAP, 50% KABF)
     Water  50%
     ADY  .70%
     Salt  .80%
     Ex. V. Olive Oil  2.75%
     Corn Oil  15%
     Sugar  2%
     Cream of Tartar  .85%
     Yellow Food Coloring  1/4 tsp
You should have not experienced a sticky dough with this formulation, it is possible that you made a mistake weighing or measuring. It happens once in a while even though i swear i calculated the right weight??
                                                                          Chiguy
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: loowaters on April 23, 2007, 02:45:40 PM
I am perplexed on what happened and figure that I must have goofed on the measurements or something (I had just bought a new digital scale).  And I didn't follow a 2 step procedure like you did but instead just mixed all the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients.  I don't know if that could have brought about the poor result that I had.


I think you're right and as Chiguy said, we've all done it.  You know how dry this should be and could've just added more flour to the dough to get near the hydration you're looking for.  The finished dough feels about as firm as the Malnati dough just less oily.  About the autolyse, I cut that short by a few minutes myself, so it shouldn't make a big difference.

Try it again, it's a good crust but not near as rich as the Malnati crust.

Loo
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: pizzoid on April 23, 2007, 03:01:50 PM
Loo:

What's the function of the Cream of Tartar in your recipe? Flavor?

I've sometimes wondered if the taste I can't reproduce is due to the type of oil I'm using, or if its something missing, like baking powder.

- pizzoid
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: loowaters on April 23, 2007, 04:56:53 PM
Loo:

What's the function of the Cream of Tartar in your recipe? Flavor?

I've sometimes wondered if the taste I can't reproduce is due to the type of oil I'm using, or if its something missing, like baking powder.

- pizzoid

Our grandmothers have at least one old cookie recipe with cream of tartar in it.  I found this explanation at baking911.com:

"Cream of tartar performs many functions. It used to give a creamier texture to sugary things like candy and frosting and to stabilize and increase the volume of beaten egg whites.

 
I do know that when I spoke with a guy that used to manage the old Gino's on Superior, he said that cream of tartar was "an important ingredient" that most weren't aware of.

Loo
 
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: pizzoid on April 23, 2007, 05:34:09 PM
Thanks! I see I'm skimming a little too fast and was asking Loo, even though it's Foodbloggers recipe. My apologies, and Foodblogger, might I ask the same question of you - is the cream of tartar there for flavor, or are you actually including it for leavening (or a bit of both)?

Thanks, Pizzoid
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: buzz on April 28, 2007, 10:06:29 AM
I can't tell by your measurements exactly how many TBS of oil you used, but the Gino's east crust is very similar to Giordano's (except for the use of EVOO), which means a ratio of 1 TBS oil: 1 cup flour. Malnati's crust is quite greasy by comparison and [/u]tastes like they use Crisco. But this might come from a use of cake flour (Uno's uses cake flour and Malnati's is the same recipe) combined with the high oil content.
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: loowaters on April 28, 2007, 03:13:26 PM
I can't tell by your measurements exactly how many TBS of oil you used, but the Gino's east crust is very similar to Giordano's (except for the use of EVOO), which means a ratio of 1 TBS oil: 1 cup flour. Malnati's crust is quite greasy by comparison and [/u]tastes like they use Crisco. But this might come from a use of cake flour (Uno's uses cake flour and Malnati's is the same recipe) combined with the high oil content.

Truthfully, I think I'd have more trouble measuring my cup of flour vs. your cup of flour per 1 T of oil.  I'm horrible when it comes volume measurements, I can't consistently make chocolate chip cookies.  I'll guess your 1 T of oil weighs about 14 g so your cup of flour should weigh something like 78 g. based on that logic and this recipe.  I don't know if that's right or wrong but it should tell you what we're looking at.  With cups weighing 78 g, that converts to 5 3/4 c of flour to make my 14" with a .13 thickness factor.  The 14" following the recipe above will require 449 g of flour, that's just 5 g less than 1 lb. of flour.

I've eaten too much of each pizza mentioned and I'm not so sure I'd make much of a comparison between Gino's East and Giordano's.  Giordano's is thinner and less oily than the Malnati's.  Malnati's crust is a more rich but thinner crust.  I think that Gino's is even less oily, or "greasy" as you put, than both but has a higher thickness factor.  In another post, DKM was pretty accurate in his assessment of Gino's crust when he descibed it as "a thicker more robust crust".  This Gino's recipe has 5% less oil than my Malnati's recipe, which is pretty significant considering the addition of other ingredients like cream of tartar and sugar as well as the increased hydration from my liquid food coloring.  Those ingredients add up to a total of 3.75% of total weight.  Maybe I'm oversiplifying it by stating that's an 8.75% relative reduction in oil vs. my Malnati's recipe.  I do know this, Malnati's doesn't use cake flour.  Try it out and see what you get.

Loo
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: November on April 28, 2007, 03:53:51 PM
I'll guess your 1 T of oil weighs about 14 g so your cup of flour should weigh something like 78 g. based on that logic and this recipe.

There's no way a cup of flour can weigh 78g.  Unless someone is measuring their flour on a planet two-thirds the size of Earth, or in a very strong electromagnetic field, flour should weigh no less than 120g per cup, with the exception of whole wheat and larger granule flour.

- red.november
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: loowaters on April 28, 2007, 04:03:34 PM
There's no way a cup of flour can weigh 78g.  Unless someone is measuring their flour on a planet two-thirds the size of Earth, or in a very strong electromagnetic field, flour should weigh no less than 120g per cup, with the exception of whole wheat and larger granule flour.

- red.november

Ah, then just as I thought...there's more oil than some people want to recognize in Chicago Style dough recipes.  Follow baker's percents and you won't go wrong.
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: buzz on May 02, 2007, 08:34:40 AM
I never have a problem with measuring flour with a measuring cup!

As for preference, everybody's taste is different, so what you like is what you like. personaly speaking, i think Malnati's/Uno's is awful--very greasy. Gino's is just like Giordano's (perhaps a bit less flaky), except for the powerful taste of extra virgin olive oil. I don't know about Malnati's flour (except that Uno's and Malnati's are the same recipe), but Uno's definitely uses cake flour (as confirmed by their corprate headquarters).

In the end, you have to make what pleases you--and this is the value of experimentation.
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: loowaters on May 03, 2007, 05:13:47 PM
I know these are looking the same but here's a 14" made with the above recipe.  The pie is 1/2 sausage and pepperoni, 1/4 just sausage, and 1/4 Canadian bacon.
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: BTB on May 04, 2007, 01:41:32 PM
Yesterday I made my second attempt to make a Chicago Style deep dish pizza with some of the Gino's East characteristics and it was a great hit with the family.  It turned out crunchy, crispy, and very tasty, the way everyone here likes it.  I sought to avoid the soft white bread thing you experienced, Loo.  Here's the recipe that I followed for a 12" pizza:

100% Harvest King Flour (ran out of KAAP)
46% water
14% corn oil
2.75% evoo
1% shortening
1% sugar
1% honey
.5% cream of tartar
.35 yellow food coloring
.75 IDY

Thickness factor of .125, dough ball weight of approximately 20 ozs.

I mixed all the dry ingredients by hand with a wooden spoon, put the yellow food coloring in very cold water (kept in freezer a short while), added the water to the dry ingredients until well blended.  Then I added the oils and the honey (just a small squirt - est. to be near a half tsp) along with a little less than a tsp of Crisco, and kneaded for about a minute.  I let it rise a little in a covered bowl for about an hour then placed the dough ball in a ziplock bag and into the refrigerator for 24 hours plus.  Took the dough ball out of the refrigerator about 2 hours before cooking. 

I used a new Pizzaware 12" pan that is 2" deep, into which I put about a quarter of a cup of regular olive oil, spread and flattened the dough ball on a floured counter till about 15" in diameter and carefully picked up the dough and placed in the pan while crimping the sides to about 1.5 inches.  I had previously pressed out the dough in the pan before, but to avoid the slip and slide with the olive oil in the pan, I thought I'd try to put the pressed out dough straight into the pan, which worked out really well.  I then put in sliced mozzarella, sausage patty, 6 in 1 sauce (drained) along with some small diced tomatoes, and added some Italian spices, salt, minced garlic, sprinkle of sugar, and a good amount of imported grated parmesan sprinkled on top of it all.  Baked at 450 for about 27 minutes on the bottom shelf of my electric GE oven, turning on the convection feature for the last 6 or 7 minutes since we like the top of the pizza darkened a little.

The family all thought that this was the best deep dish pizza that I've done to date.  It was really great.  Here is a picture of the cooked pizza.       --BTB

Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: BTB on May 04, 2007, 01:45:46 PM
Here were the last few slices that didn't last very long after I took the picture.  Every crumb was lustfully consumed.
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: loowaters on May 04, 2007, 01:48:58 PM
Looks really good.  I love the thin upper crust thing ya got goin' with this.  I like to do that with my Malnati's crust, just pinch it really thin.

Loo
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: BTB on May 04, 2007, 02:00:37 PM
Below is a picture of the Pizzaware 3 piece pizza pan set that I picked up the other day from a local kitchen supply store and in which I made the above deep dish pizza.  It include 12" pans and a trimming lid for classic and deep dish style pizzas and is made from hard-coated anodized aluminum.  You can check their products out at www.chefsplanet.com (http://www.chefsplanet.com).  Has anyone else had any experience with their pizza pans?  So far I have been very satisfied with the deep dish pan, but haven't tried the classic style pan yet.
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: Pete-zza on May 04, 2007, 02:02:17 PM
BTB,

Out of curiosity, did you use the new deep-dish dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/dd_calculator.html to come up with the quantities of ingredients to use? It seems a natural for what you did.

Peter
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: BTB on May 04, 2007, 02:37:01 PM
Oh I've definitely been using the new deep-dish dough calculating tool ever since it came out recently.  That's all I use now.  It is really great and simple to use and very helpful when you want to experiment a bit and see what a little change here and there does to the formulation.  Outstanding tool. 
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: Pete-zza on May 04, 2007, 02:46:57 PM
BTB,

Thanks for the feedback. It helps to know whether the tool is proving useful to our members.

If you come up with a blockbuster deep-dish dough formulation, you might consider using the Copy feature of the tool to display all of the quantities for your particular formulation in a post, together with the related information (pan size, pan depth, dough depth, pan shape, thickness factor, dough ball weight, etc.) to allow others to use the tool to reproduce your data, or to use to modify your formulations for a different pan size. I believe you provided the related information for your most recent creation in your previous post(s).

Peter
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: Peterubers on June 06, 2007, 12:44:32 PM
I've made this Gino's recipe several times (about 5 or 6 times) and I truly agree with the 48 hour fridge rise it comes very close to the real Gino's crust -- about 85% of the way there.  Though the food coloring did not obviously contribute to any flavor/texture... it's a nice addition to this crust to bring the final product visually closer to the real deal. 

One thing I've noticed with all chicago deep dish crusts -- the less you manipulate the dough (i.e. less kneading and less handling/spreading during application into the deep dish pan just prior to baking) the better it is -- better in terms of less breadi-ness and more biscuit-like texture.
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: foodblogger on August 04, 2007, 09:51:52 AM
Good gawd all those pizzas look good.  I'm going to have to fire up my oven sometime soon.  I've been making my pizzas with a combo of sausage and pepperoni lately.  I can't buy good pizza at a restaurant here in Louisville but I'll be going to the Iowa Hawkeye game over the Sept 1st weekend in Chicago so I'll be sure to stop by some of my old haunts.   Gino's is of course first on the list.

I heard it moved back close to the original location.  I can't wait to check it out.
FB
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: stonefree_pizza on September 04, 2007, 10:18:33 AM
I have a couple of noob questions, if these are answered in other areas please send me links in the forum. Hello Everyone!

1. I have heard a lot of talk on Gino's crust, sauce, cheese consistency. But does anyone have a formulation and method for creation of the Gino's sausage slab. I don't live in Chicago anymore, and when i tell people about this they look at me like i have "lobsters crawling out of my ears".

2. Anyone tried freezing this doe, does it work, my goal would be to either freeze the doe or make prebuilt pizzas that can be frozen and vacuumn sealed for a easy to prepare taste of heaven.

Stonefree
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: loowaters on September 04, 2007, 10:57:32 AM
Welcome to the forum.

The subject of the sausage patty was discussed here:  http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4226.0.html

Freezing?  I've got a buddy that says his deep dish dough freezes and thaws OK.  He uses a version of the Gino's recipe at the beginning of this thread.  I've never tried it.

Loo
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: dms on September 04, 2007, 11:23:28 AM

1. I have heard a lot of talk on Gino's crust, sauce, cheese consistency. But does anyone have a formulation and method for creation of the Gino's sausage slab. I don't live in Chicago anymore, and when i tell people about this they look at me like i have "lobsters crawling out of my ears".

My local supermarket makes a mild italian sausage that's pretty close to what Gino's uses.  They sell it both in casings, and in bulk.  I buy it bulk.  To do a Gino's style sausage disk, I roll the sausage out on a flexible cutting board.  I normally make stuffed pies in a 10" spring form pan, and use about a pound of sausage.  (I'd use a bit less, 12 or 13 oz, but that's how they pack it, and I don't need leftover sausage, most of the time.)  I press or roll it out into a disk 12" in diameter, and then fry it in a skillet.  It's much easier to get the sausage off the cutting board if you start with a cold skillet.  I invert the cutting board over the skillet, bend the edge up, and slip a piece of dental floss between the board and the saussage.  I don't cook it all the way, but get it close.  That gets much of the water and excess fat out, which keeps the pie from being as soggy. 
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: gitarslinger on October 09, 2007, 12:31:19 AM
"Mixed with baking soda, it becomes double-acting baking powder, a leavening agent. 1 teaspoon baking powder = Blend 1/4 teaspoon baking soda plus 1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar 
 


This isn't quite right, IIRC.  Baking soda is a base, cream of tartar is an acid.  It takes both to make the bubbles that act as leavening.  Double-acting baking soda actually has two activating acids, a quick-acting one to get the leavening going at lower temperatures early in the baking, and another slower-acting one to keep it going as the temperature rises.  There are actually a number of different activating acids that can be used.

Jim
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: gitarslinger on October 09, 2007, 12:41:35 AM

One thing I've noticed with all chicago deep dish crusts -- the less you manipulate the dough (i.e. less kneading and less handling/spreading during application into the deep dish pan just prior to baking) the better it is -- better in terms of less breadi-ness and more biscuit-like texture.

The more you knead the dough, the more the glutenin and gliadin combine to form and strengthen the gluten structure, which produces firmness in bread.  Biscuits are made with lower protein (less gluten) flours and kneaded very little, then usually chemically leavened (baking powder).

All this makes me wonder if a lower-protein cake or pastry flour might be a better choice for a Gino's-style crust than a higher-protein bread flour?  Has anybody run a side-by-side?

The cream of tartar may well act to condition the dough to help develop the "biscuit-like" texture you mention.  Someone might try a side-by-side with and without cream of tartar, too.  I might do it myself, for that matter.  Some day.  :-)

Jim
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: loowaters on October 09, 2007, 12:06:30 PM
This isn't quite right, IIRC.  Baking soda is a base, cream of tartar is an acid.  It takes both to make the bubbles that act as leavening.  Double-acting baking soda actually has two activating acids, a quick-acting one to get the leavening going at lower temperatures early in the baking, and another slower-acting one to keep it going as the temperature rises.  There are actually a number of different activating acids that can be used.

Jim

What you're describing (accurately) is a double acting baking powder vs. what is decribed in my quote, which actually came from baking911.com, a single acting baking powder.  Either way, we're not adding baking powder to the recipe just the potassium bitartrate (potassium acid salt or just cream of tartar).  I still don't know exactly why it's there, but it is and I'm not moving it out because this crust comes out perfect every time I make it.
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: loowaters on October 09, 2007, 12:09:05 PM
All this makes me wonder if a lower-protein cake or pastry flour might be a better choice for a Gino's-style crust than a higher-protein bread flour?  Has anybody run a side-by-side?

Buzz has always contended that Pizzaria Uno uses cake flour.  Pretty sure Gino's uses AP.
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: gitarslinger on October 10, 2007, 05:36:04 PM
What you're describing (accurately) is a double acting baking powder vs. what is decribed in my quote, which actually came from baking911.com, a single acting baking powder.  Either way, we're not adding baking powder to the recipe just the potassium bitartrate (potassium acid salt or just cream of tartar).  I still don't know exactly why it's there, but it is and I'm not moving it out because this crust comes out perfect every time I make it.

But the quote specifically stated that baking soda + cream of tartar = double-acting baking powder.  That's what I was referring to.

I think you're right about leaving the cream of tartar in despite the lack of baking soda or any other base.  My suspicion is that it might have a dough-softening effect of some sort.  If all goes as planned, I'll be experimenting with a side-by-side tomorrow.  I'll let you know if I manage to make anything besides a brick.

Jim
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: loowaters on October 11, 2007, 05:42:34 AM
But the quote specifically stated that baking soda + cream of tartar = double-acting baking powder.  That's what I was referring to.

I think you're right about leaving the cream of tartar in despite the lack of baking soda or any other base.  My suspicion is that it might have a dough-softening effect of some sort.  If all goes as planned, I'll be experimenting with a side-by-side tomorrow.  I'll let you know if I manage to make anything besides a brick.

Jim

I guess it does say that.  I need to read the material that I've quoted better.  Good luck on the experiment.

Loo
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: gitarslinger on October 11, 2007, 10:23:50 PM
I guess it does say that.  I need to read the material that I've quoted better.  Good luck on the experiment.

Loo

The experiment was a success.  Scientifically speaking, I suppose all experiments are successful at something, but in this case I mean to say I managed to make a decent pizza out of the whole thing.

I used the recipe in loo's post that opened this thread for the dough (thanks very much for that!), but subbed short patent flour for the all-purpose.  A decent Wisconsin mozzarella with Bellino peeled tomatoes (chopped in a food processor) provided the basics, and a Johnsonville mild sausage patty was set off by sauteed mushrooms and black olives.

I made two dough balls, one with cream of tartar and one without, and ran a mini-pizza comparison through the oven.  The crusts were nearly indistinguishable.  Secret ingredient?  It did seem the cream of tartar crust was just a bit softer, but the difference was negligable.

For nit-picks, I made the crust too thick, neglected to pre-heat the pizza stone long enough (I'm using one of those aluminum pans), and the olive oil I used was a bit strong in flavor.  But it was still an excellent, restaurant-quality overall.  Many thanks to all contributors to this thread!

The thick dough prevented the overall crispness one expects from a Gino's or Giordano's crust, but the "biscuit-like" texture was certainly present.  I suspect the short patent flour and the very low hand-kneading times (no more than two minutes) contribute more to this than the cream of tartar.

I wound up with half a pizza left (it's a huge pan), and have the second dough ball waiting in the freezer.  I'll be eating well for a while, it seems.  :-)

Jim
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: loowaters on October 12, 2007, 06:18:10 AM
Jim, nice work on your efforts.  Too thick with the dough, that's easy to remedy.  How much did the dough balls weigh and what size pan were you working with?

Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: BTB on October 12, 2007, 09:00:51 AM
"Short patent flour" . . . is what again?  Cake flour?  What exactly is it?  Has anyone else tried to use cake flour to duplicate the original Pizzeria Uno/Due's pizza (not Malnati's) as was mentioned above? 

When in Chicago this past summer for a few months, we again had some delicious deep dish pizzas from Pizzeria Due, Lou Malnati's, Pizano's, and Gino's East.  Due's was our group's clear number one choice, Malnati's a close second (while crust is similar, it still is distinctively different), Pizano's a close third, and Gino's East in a far last place (tried it twice).

I've had some success (and many failures) at making a Malnati's-like deep dish pizza and would like to switch and try doing a crust more similar to Pizzeria Uno & Due's.  While some on these threads have said Uno/Due's crust is the same as Malnati's, they definitely are not. 
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: loowaters on October 12, 2007, 10:31:18 AM
I've had some success (and many failures) at making a Malnati's-like deep dish pizza and would like to switch and try doing a crust more similar to Pizzeria Uno & Due's.  While some on these threads have said Uno/Due's crust is the same as Malnati's, they definitely are not. 

Like I posted above, Buzz has always said that Uno uses cake flour.  Try it and see what differences you find when you replace the AP with cake flour in your favorite Malnati's recipe.  Let us know how it turns out.
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: dms on October 12, 2007, 01:50:03 PM
"Short patent flour" . . . is what again?  Cake flour?  What exactly is it? 

Non-whole grain wheat flour is made from the interior of the wheat kernel.  The bran and germ are removed, leaving the endosperm.  The endosperm is ground.  The flour flour that is made from the center part of the endosperm is called "patent flour"  It's lighter in color, being farthest from the bran.  Short patent is made from the centermost bits (about half the endosperm), long patent is made from that plus the next bit.  It's protein content will depend on what sort of wheat(s) the flour is made from. 

Cake and pastry flours are usually made from short patent flours of low-protein wheat.
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: gitarslinger on October 14, 2007, 06:15:58 PM
Non-whole grain wheat flour is made from the interior of the wheat kernel.  The bran and germ are removed, leaving the endosperm.  The endosperm is ground.  The flour flour that is made from the center part of the endosperm is called "patent flour"  It's lighter in color, being farthest from the bran.  Short patent is made from the centermost bits (about half the endosperm), long patent is made from that plus the next bit.  It's protein content will depend on what sort of wheat(s) the flour is made from. 

Cake and pastry flours are usually made from short patent flours of low-protein wheat.

That's right.  The short patent flour I used was a lower-protein variety, intended for pastries, biscuits, etc.  Not as low as cake flour, but not as high as all-purpose.  Hudson Cream was the brand name.  It was available at the grocer, Baker's/Dillon's/Kroger (all the same outfit).

Jim
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: gitarslinger on October 14, 2007, 06:19:33 PM
Jim, nice work on your efforts.  Too thick with the dough, that's easy to remedy.  How much did the dough balls weigh and what size pan were you working with?



I knew I was going to be playing around with comparisons, so I intentionally shot for too much dough.  I started with 700g of flour for each, figuring I could trim the excess.  The pan is 16".  I didn't trim enough...  :-)

I followed suit with the rest of you and took pics of the finished pizza, but haven't taken the time to transfer them to the computer yet.  I'll post them here when I do.

Jim
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: foodblogger on October 16, 2007, 04:48:16 PM
Its good to see that you guys are experimenting with the recipe.  I really have not found the cream of tartar to make a huge difference.  I keep it in there just because I think it is used in the Gino's crusts.  One of these times I am going to make a version with cake flour to see how different it is.

The recipe, as posted, has a taste and texture almost identical to what you will get at Gino's.  I just got a takeout from the Gino's on Diversey about a month ago with some friends who have eaten my version of Gino's.  The similarity is uncanny.  I think you'll find that with a little practice and personalization you will quickly be making better pizzas than what you can get in any restaurant.  I love Gino's and I would never knock it but I've come to prefer my own pizza - owner's pride I guess.

Lately I have been experimenting a bit with stuffed crust.  I haven't posted my results and methods here yet out of laziness but I did put some pretty detailed instructions on my blog.  I borrowed the brown sugar idea from another post on this forum.  I'm not sure if I am going to keep it or not.  Last weekend I ate at my favorite stuffed crust place and I still have a way to go to get a crust that tasty.  Anyway best of luck with your pizzas everyone!
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: Pete-zza on October 16, 2007, 05:20:30 PM
foodblogger,

Welcome back.

I don't know if I mentioned it to you before but we now have a deep-dish dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/dd_calculator.html. In can be used for both a standard deep-dish dough formulation and a stuffed version. It is quite a versatile tool.

Peter
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: foodblogger on October 20, 2007, 07:49:05 AM
Yeah pete I saw that calculator and it is awesome.  It has been in my bookmarks for a while and I use it now and again if I am making a new size pizza.  I never really left the site, I've been lurking but I've been incredibly busy in real life -- too busy to post about pizza.  Sadly I only have enough time to make pizza now.  Things should get a little better for me next July. 

I'm going to try a stuffed tonight with cake flour and a colorless, flavorless and cheap oil.  I'll use the calculator to be sure.

Edit:
PS - I love that the calculator includes a little box for yellow food coloring!  So hawt!
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: Pete-zza on October 20, 2007, 09:47:02 AM
I love that the calculator includes a little box for yellow food coloring!  So hawt!

foodblogger,

You were the one responsible for that addition. I came across that ingredient from one of your recipes when I was scouring deep-dish dough recipes to see what ingredients were being used. I also saw it (and, I believe, a second food coloring) in the ingredients list for the Gino's East dough recipe.

Peter
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: foodblogger on October 21, 2007, 07:17:40 AM
Figuring out that yellow food coloring was the reason Gino's dough was yellow is really the only real thing I have contributed to the home pizza world.  Once I found this board my pizza making improved by leaps and bounds.  The internet is such a great tool. 

I made my version of Gino's last night using cake flour.  I can describe the results with one word - aweful.  Oh well, it wasn't the first bad pizza I've made and it won't be the last.  Thank goodness I didn't have company over.  At least I've learned not to try anything new in public.  :pizza:
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: BTB on October 26, 2007, 11:18:40 AM
Quote
Buzz has always said that Uno uses cake flour.  Try it and see what differences you find when you replace the AP with cake flour in your favorite Malnati's recipe.  Let us know how it turns out.

OK, a couple of weeks ago, I tried a loowaters-like Malnati's recipe in an attempt to more closely match the original Uno/Due crust with 47% hydration, soybean oil instead of corn oil, and cake flour instead of AP.  I cooked the pizza for 24 minutes on a pizza stone at 450 and while the pizza looked fairly good, it was not done enough.  Except for the outer crust, it was not crisp at all and probably could have been cooked for at least another 5 or 10 minutes.  The dough was very soft and pliable and was very easy to form and put into the pan, but very difficult to get out of the pan.  The cooked dough was so soft it actually fell apart as I was taking it out of the pan, which with other recipes had never been a problem for me.  Pictures below of the pizza.

This pizza in no way tasted like the original Pizzeria Uno/Due by the Medina Temple in Chicago.  It was not anywhere as good.  Actually it tasted remarkably similar to the disreputed "franchise" Uno's that have popped up across the country as well as the Uno's pizzas that are now available in many grocery stores.  Those franchise Uno's restaurant and grocery pizzas bear NO resemblance to the original Pizzeria Uno/Due pizza (except maybe that they are round!).  What a shame that their name is allowed to be associated with such a product.

My take away from this experiment . . . . . . . . . . . forget the cake flour! ! !
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: foodblogger on October 27, 2007, 11:49:46 AM
BTB - mine looked identical to that.  I had very similarly aweful results with cake flour. 
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: BDoggPizza on October 16, 2008, 11:55:41 AM
Loowaters:

Do you bake this one at 475* on the middle rack on top of a pizza stone or just on the rack no stone?  I see foodblogger does his on bottom rack at 450* right on the rack. 

I have a standard electric home kitchen oven and a stone.  I am dying to try my first GINO'S Clone and want to get it right.  I also have a non-stick PSTK pan from pizzatools.com, not a real seasoned pan from a pizza joint like some of you use.  That can make a difference I suppose.

Thanks for the help!
BDogg
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: loowaters on October 16, 2008, 09:12:39 PM
For this I use middle rack, no stone at 475. 

Unless you have a reflective pan, I'm thinkin' the stone isn't necessary for deep dish cooking.  My efforts show that direct contact with the stone helps it crisp up in those shiny pans.
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: BDoggPizza on October 16, 2008, 10:01:48 PM
Thanks for the reply Loo!
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: bennychuck on April 08, 2009, 03:19:58 PM
I made the recipe at the beginning of this thread a couple weeks ago, and it turned out fantastic.  Super close to the gino's crust (I ate there last week, more about that later).  the only thing I did differently was not use food coloring, and I used the 50% hydration level to be on the safe side (baking at high altitude).  i used a little over 2 T of olive oil in the bottom of my 12" deep dish pan and baked at 450 for a little over 20 minutes.  Sorry, no pics, as this pizza did not last long. 

I then ate at gino's (Superior location) in Chicago last week, and I've drawn two conclusions as a result of this visit.  First, based on the texture of the crust on the bottom, I'm almost 100% convinced now that they press the dough into the pan, rather than rolling it out first.  Second, based on the crunch you get in the crust, coupled with the texture, I'm almost 100% convinced that there's at least a little bit of semolina flour in the crust.  I could be wrong, but I plan on trying out this recipe with about 10% semolina next time to see what happens. 
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: bennychuck on February 01, 2010, 12:35:05 PM
Tried this again over the weekend, and, as usual, it turned out quite well.  It's been a while since I made this, and I did make a couple mistakes.  First, I didn't add quite enough salt to my sauce.  For sauce I used a 28 oz can of Delallo plum tomatoes, which I pull out individually and crush with a potato masher, then season appropriately with salt, pepper, oregano, basil, and a little sugar.  I sometimes add a little of the puree they come in if I feel I don't have quite enough sauce.  Second mistake, I think, was leaving the pie in the oven a couple minutes too long, which, from my experience, makes the cheese get a little rubbery and it doesn't have that nice gooey, melty quality.  Anyone else experience this ever?  I've had it happen a few times. 

As for the crust, though, it was magnificent as always with this recipe, and this was my first time concocting this with a scale and not with converted volume measurements.  I also did not use the yellow food coloring, as it does nothing for the actual taste of the crust.  My girlfriend is a vegetarian, so I topped it with cheese and roasted garlic.  I baked at 450* for a little over 20 minutes.  Here's some pictures:

Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: Squirrelman on April 01, 2010, 12:19:47 AM
Hi, I thought it would be best to ask this question directly in this topic since it relates to it so here it is.

I don't have a dark ionized pan or w/e like Chicago deep dish recipes seem to generally use, would a cast iron pan work? I have read that aluminum pans don't work well generally and especially spring pans which could cause additional problems. I believe I made a deep dish in my cast iron pan twice before and it worked nicely but I've never tried a Chicago style pizza before.

also is there a big difference between Chicago style deep dish pizza and deep dish pizza you can find at some pizza restaurants and pizza hut? based on the pictures there seems to be a noticeable difference so I would like to try one but I wasn't sure of what to expect. one thing I have notices is they seem to resemble an actual pie more than the pizza i'm used to in that they have raised edges and much more sauce than usual pizza (or so it seems, correct me if I'm mistaken). oh and the food coloring is just for looks? I assume it can be omitted.

any other advice would be appreciated, I am reading through the comments for as much advice possible but I am a bit hesitant in trying this because of never having had a professional version before I really don't know what its suppose to come out like aside from the pictures and want to make sure it is authentic as possible for my first try. I looked into ordering one of the apparently famous frozen ones but they cost a bit much so I might try this recipe. thanks in advance for any tips.
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: loowaters on April 01, 2010, 06:23:55 AM
Squirrelman, good to see you'd like to take a stab at Chicago deep dish pizza.  Deep dish pizza is Chicago style, made in pan, sauce on top, pizza.  Pizza Hut tried it for a while about 10 years ago but abandoned it.  I can't think of any other type of deep dish but if in fact you're are thinking of pan pizza, many discussions on that style are available for viewing over on the "Thick Style" forum page.

For your pan, you can get away with a lighter colored pan if it's not too reflective or use a pizza stone on the lowest rack setting in your oven, or even on the floor of the oven if you have no exposed element.  Preheat the stone for a good 45-60 mins. as hot as the oven will go before baking the pizza.  The direct contact with the stone helps crisp up the bottom.  Or you can use the cast iron skillet.  Not my favorite but plenty have had success with it.

Yes, the food coloring can be omitted.

Loo
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: Squirrelman on April 01, 2010, 10:44:29 AM
thank you for responding, one other question, by the mixing explanation it sounds like you pretty much mix it like a cake just until combined and smooth, no gluten buildup? most recipes seem to have a 5-10 mixing period but for this recipe i'm assuming it would only take 1-3 minutes. Am I misunderstanding your instructions?

oh and on a side note the closest thing I've made to a Chicago style was what I assumed was a deep dish (made it at least a year ago) but seems to more closely resemble a thick pizza, or at least based on the pictures for Chicago style pizza it doesn't seem to fit in (not that it was intended to, I didn't even know about Chicago style pizza until recently)

thank you again, I'll give the recipe a try and should see how it comes out in ~2 days.

Edit: Here's what I am trying based on the deep dish calculator and your numbers, measured my pan to be about 12 in. on top. 10 on the bottom. and 2 deep. your thickness factor and I guessed the length up the pan to be 1.5 in.

--------------
Flour (100%):               265.85 g  |  9.38 oz | 0.59 lbs
Water (49%):                130.27 g  |  4.59 oz | 0.29 lbs
IDY (.75%):                  1.99 g | 0.07 oz | 0 lbs | 0.66 tsp | 0.22 tbsp
Olive Oil (2%):             5.32 g | 0.19 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.18 tsp | 0.39 tbsp
Corn Oil (16%):           42.54 g | 1.5 oz | 0.09 lbs | 9.45 tsp | 3.15 tbsp
Sugar (2%):                  5.32 g | 0.19 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.33 tsp | 0.44 tbsp
Cream of Tartar (1%):  2.66 g | 0.09 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.89 tsp | 0.3 tbsp
Total (170.75%):          453.94 g | 16.01 oz | 1 lbs | TF = 0.1326
--------------
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: loowaters on April 01, 2010, 08:31:37 PM
You're right Squirrelman, you're not giving this a very long knead.  I just made a Malnati's clone today and kneaded that dough ball (820g) in KA w/ "C" hook on mix speed for 2:30 and it was perfect. 

Those numbers look fine for the pie.  Good luck with it and please post photos no matter how it turns out. 

Loo
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: Squirrelman on April 01, 2010, 09:00:09 PM
ok good, hehe no more setbacks yet, started the dough then realized I had tartar sauce instead of cream of tartar so had to run back to shoprite hehe. but the dough seems pretty good so I'll get back to you on Sunday.

 as for filling I'm not completely sure but based on the things I've read a can of crushed tomatoes with some seasonings,  mozzarella cheese and Parmesan mixed in should do, considering adding sliced pepperoni but not sure yet. looks like most people tend to make Chicago pizza into a meat lovers type usually with a large sausage patty and other meats but I'd rather stick with just cheese and tomatoes and possibly pepperoni. should I expect to use a full can of drained crushed tomatoes?

oh and when you formed your pizza and filled it, was the procedure pretty much the same as this post(first 4 pictures by BTB)? http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6480.0.html
 I had assumed it was the same general procedure but never hurts to make sure.

also now that I think of it, I plan to try my cast iron pan since it worked well with the thick pizza I made and is more likely to do well than my other pans, but if I remember right cast iron takes a while to heat up, and I think its safe to assume I can't preheat it for this type of pizza. then again cast iron probably doesn't take that much longer to heat than other pans so i'm probably over-thinking it and it won't be a problem.
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: loowaters on April 02, 2010, 08:08:22 AM
Oh man.  Yes, cream of tartar not tartar sauce!  :)

Using crushed tomatoes, I season with some sea salt and pepper and some extra virgin olive oil and a bit of crushed garlic.  Top the pizza with some parm before throwing it in the oven.  Pepperoni will be just fine if that's all you want on it.  Often times I just make a pepperoni pie myself.

Forming the pizza like BTB shows in the thread referenced is right.  One thing about Gino's vs. Malnati's, though, is that this is a thicker crust and the crust ring that they shape is much larger than the tightly pinched type at Malnati's that you see in that thread of BTB's.

You are overthinking the cast iron pan just a bit.  If it's a real concern about it coming to temp, start it on the bottom rack and move it up a slot a few minutes into the bake.

Loo

Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: Squirrelman on April 15, 2010, 04:29:38 PM
Hey, I've been busy with school so didn't get a chance to reply back earlier. hmm well I've never had a professional Chicago style so I don't know what it should have been like, but for a first try it wasn't too bad, we couldn't eat it really but that was mostly 1 issue. I'll probably try it again eventually but atm I'm working on a different style pizza I've been trying to get right. well the things that seemed wrong with it were: A) the crust was pretty thin, not really sure why, maybe my dough calculations were too small but the pan was the size I put in so I'm not sure. or maybe that's just how thick it was suppose to be. B) The main issue was the sauce, it was way too overwhelming, I put way too much thinking it needed a lot because most pictures I've seen looked like they used a lot. C) I'm not sure how to describe the crust, I was expecting something king of biscuity but ended up kind of like a tough stale cracker texture... if that's a good description, I must have overmixed it or something, although I only mixed it until it was combined so maybe I did something else wrong. Again for a first try I though it wasn't bad and I know some things to fix for my next attempt. Oh and next time I think I'll try diced tomatoes rather than crushed. Here is a picture although the pictures color is odd and its really blurry and looks pretty gross actually, maybe I switched the settings by accident because it didn't look too bad unlike the picture.

http://img683.imageshack.us/img683/3296/dsc00983c.jpg

any advice would be good or any ideas why the crust could have been like I described it. for starters I am trying less tomatoes next time and using diced instead, maybe more dough and I'll try to see if anything I did could have overmixed it without me realizing it. other than that I'll probably try it again in a few weeks or something depending on how busy I am.

Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: foodblogger on January 09, 2016, 03:49:10 PM
This is posted as a sticky as BTB's recipe for Gino's east?  Where did this originate?  LULZ.  Super glad people are enjoying variations on my recipe.  I'm going to try one now.  :)
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: Garvey on January 09, 2016, 08:00:47 PM
A sticky?  Hardly.  lol.  This thing dropped to page 16 and hadn't had any posts for almost six years until you necro'ed it today.

(bonus lulz: the adoration of cornmeal)

Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: foodblogger on October 08, 2016, 07:19:22 AM
When I mentioned that my recipe was accredited to BTB in a sticky, I was specifically mentioning this sticky, which you started:
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=36964.0 (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=36964.0)

At the red arrows, you attribute my recipe for Gino's East to both Loowaters and BTB.

If the photo doesn't show up in the post - see it here:  (http://i1122.photobucket.com/albums/l533/averageiowaguy/pizza_zps0gilpjsw.jpg) (http://s1122.photobucket.com/user/averageiowaguy/media/pizza_zps0gilpjsw.jpg.html)

I realize you've only been a member since 2012 and may not know the origination of some of these recipes.  The posters you linked to credit me which is really cool.  It doesn't make a huge difference either way, but if you want to be accurate, they were making variations of my recipe for Gino's East.  I started working on that recipe in 1988.  It took me literally years to figure it out, and my efforts on that predate this forum and wide use of the internet in general.  The first time I ever posted that recipe was on a blog I ran for a long time.

http://damngoodfood.blogspot.com/2005/12/ginos-east-pizza-recipe.html (http://damngoodfood.blogspot.com/2005/12/ginos-east-pizza-recipe.html)

Anyway, happy pizza making.  I'm making pizza tonight!   :chef:  :pizza:

Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: Garvey on October 12, 2016, 07:22:25 AM
Welcome back!  See you in 2020, when you post again.   ;D
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: pythonic on October 14, 2016, 07:15:47 PM
Welcome back!  See you in 2020, when you post again.   ;D

Lol
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: foodblogger on October 16, 2016, 08:25:40 PM
Welcome back!  See you in 2020, when you post again.   ;D

Are you really a moderator?  LOL.  Jeez, I wonder why people don't contribute all that much.  So you got nothing.  Yes you stickied not one but 2 deep dish recipes that I contributed but you attributed them to other people.  When I pointed it out you insulted me.  It's only a pizza recipe after all, and anyone reading (obviously excluding a moderator on the site) knows where it came from.  The reason you have a deep dish calculator that has yellow food coloring as an ingredient (and one other) is because I figured it out, six years before you ever logged on to the forum.  You clearly didn't even read the threads that you stickied with my recipes before attributing them to other people.  What you could have done is to just admit - 'oh darn (or another word) I've only been here a few years and I don't know everything.  Let me correct that.'  Instead you chose the insult route. Best of luck in life.
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: Garvey on October 16, 2016, 10:08:51 PM
It was a joke, Foodblogger. 

Peace.
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: Pete-zza on October 17, 2016, 11:17:53 AM
foodblogger,

I recall working with you on your dough formulation several years ago, when I was using a spreadsheet that was the precursor for the deep dish dough calculating tool, so I know that there are a few threads devoted to your take on the Gino's East pizza. If you can collect the threads and give me the links, I should be able to add them to the master list.

BTW, good to see you back even if it is just a brief visit.

Peter
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: pythonic on April 21, 2017, 06:25:51 PM
This crust rocks.  Finally tried it last night
Title: Re: Props: Foodblogger's Gino's East recipe
Post by: mrmojo1 on April 21, 2017, 11:01:36 PM
Pictures Pythonic!!!!  you make some of the best around!!  love seeing them!!