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Offline Pod4477

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #80 on: May 03, 2019, 01:39:49 AM »
Not familiar with the Pizzeria Regina ovens. If you are going to use lump wood charcoal, i think you might as well just burn hardwood logs down. That's all a bag of royal oak is.

Just to clarify, I was describing the slab at the bottom of my oven. My stand is similar to the one in the Forno Bravo Pompeii oven plans.  So from the existing sand there is 12 inches of compacted crusher run, plastic barrier, 5.5 inch thick reinforced concrete stab, stacked block (some cells filled with bar and concrete, I think it was 5 courses), a reinforced concrete slab, 3.5 inches of perlcrete 2 inches of insulation board, oven floor/dome, insulation blankets and loose perlite. The whole thing is covered by a structure (which still needs finish work).

I went back re-read this just because I understand it more now.  So you went all out and doubled insulation by using perlcrete and then insulation board.  Pretty awesome.  How did you level the two layers of concrete separately?  I feel like I could make a frame and screed regular concrete, then move the frame up a few inches and screed the perlcrete.  Forno Bravo only said to use concrete slab and then FB board or perlcrete, but you did both  ;D.

My goal is to have the concrete level with the top of the block caps, so I could do 5.5" concrete/perlcrete depth from the top of the bock, if I do your setup.  In the book he just uses 2" perlcrete, lays solid blocks on top of that, and then firebrick, but your warning of concrete and fire is a good one.  I wonder if I could do just 5.5" of perlcrete and then insulation board, and then firebrick. 

1.  Do you think insulation board would be enough on top of regular concrete slabs, or does the doubling up of perlcrete under the board make a big difference? 
2.  Also, the blankets and loose perlite are over the firebrick dome/cieling I'm assuming, but what did you put over that?  I'm thinking I may use concrete poured over the insulation.
3.  Should I use rebar inside the hearth slab?  The book doesn't use it but I know you did and it's usually a good idea.  If I fill the stand with gravel I could probably prop them up with rubble or set them inside the wood form as Forno Bravo instructs.

I also need to decide whether or not I go with a dome or a flat ceiling, and I would do a flue behind the door for a dome.  I get that it keeps the heat in the dome, but I wonder how it would work with a flat ceiling oven.
Sorry for so many questions.
« Last Edit: May 03, 2019, 03:11:05 AM by Pod4477 »

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #81 on: May 03, 2019, 09:22:06 AM »
It might be worth restating/clarifying exactly what you want to accomplish with the oven: pizza style(s), bake temps, warm up time, fuel type, foods other than pizza?, etc. Giving suggestions on a door design or how to hang a flat roof are one thing. The questions you are asking now really require for you to settle in on a set of operating specifications first.
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Offline Jon in Albany

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #82 on: May 03, 2019, 09:41:23 AM »
I went back re-read this just because I understand it more now.  So you went all out and doubled insulation by using perlcrete and then insulation board.  Pretty awesome.  How did you level the two layers of concrete separately?  I feel like I could make a frame and screed regular concrete, then move the frame up a few inches and screed the perlcrete.  Forno Bravo only said to use concrete slab and then FB board or perlcrete, but you did both  ;D.

My goal is to have the concrete level with the top of the block caps, so I could do 5.5" concrete/perlcrete depth from the top of the bock, if I do your setup.  In the book he just uses 2" perlcrete, lays solid blocks on top of that, and then firebrick, but your warning of concrete and fire is a good one.  I wonder if I could do just 5.5" of perlcrete and then insulation board, and then firebrick. 

1.  Do you think insulation board would be enough on top of regular concrete slabs, or does the doubling up of perlcrete under the board make a big difference? 
2.  Also, the blankets and loose perlite are over the firebrick dome/cieling I'm assuming, but what did you put over that?  I'm thinking I may use concrete poured over the insulation.
3.  Should I use rebar inside the hearth slab?  The book doesn't use it but I know you did and it's usually a good idea.  If I fill the stand with gravel I could probably prop them up with rubble or set them inside the wood form as Forno Bravo instructs.

I also need to decide whether or not I go with a dome or a flat ceiling, and I would do a flue behind the door for a dome.  I get that it keeps the heat in the dome, but I wonder how it would work with a flat ceiling oven.
Sorry for so many questions.

1. Insulation board by itself is good. 2 inches in the minimum recommendation. I copied an idea to use perlcrete as an added insulation and if a little water got it, it would hang out in the perlcrete and not the board. To form the perlcrete, I made a box out of 2x4s and locked it to the slab using scrap wood and tapcon screws. I filled in and smoothed the top of the perlcrete layer with fire clay. The board went in pretty level

2. I didn't put anything over the loose perlite. Once everything was framed and the walls were up, I poured in the loose perlite. A few hours later the plywood for the roof was up and covered with snow/ice barrier. I kept a tarp over the chimney until the shingles and flashing were up. That was only a few days later.

3. I think rebar is a good idea in slabs. I went overkill on mine. The bottom slab is tied into the walls and that bar ties into the top slab. Add on the steel framing and I built a fortress.

Not sure on the stand dimensions but I think it would be easier to frame the top slab than add fill. The lower face of the top slab does not need to be level, just the top. Around the inside of the block, I attached 2x4s with tapcon screws. I made a cross brace with a 2x6 and supported a in the corners and middle with extra concrete block and wood shims. I attached a few pictures to clarify.

Edit: I also had the top slab overhang the concrete block. I did that by screwing 2x6 pieces to the block with tapcons and the attaching 2x8s to those pieces to form and level the top of the slab. Those were attached with deck screws and supported to the lower slab in a few places with 2x4s. (End edit)

I have to agree with Craig's advice. You don't want to be deciding on what style of oven you are building during the build.
« Last Edit: May 03, 2019, 09:46:34 AM by Jon in Albany »

Offline Pod4477

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #83 on: May 03, 2019, 11:03:42 PM »
It might be worth restating/clarifying exactly what you want to accomplish with the oven: pizza style(s), bake temps, warm up time, fuel type, foods other than pizza?, etc. Giving suggestions on a door design or how to hang a flat roof are one thing. The questions you are asking now really require for you to settle in on a set of operating specifications first.

Thank you and yup, you're right.  I think I'm going more for a bread oven now.  My original idea was coal fired to replicate Pizzeria Regina's old oven setup, but I think it may be too tough in a home setting and I don't think coal is a good idea at home.  I'm going for the bread-ish style of Pizzeria Regina which is usually baked around 600-660F.  I'd preferably like the warm up time to be 3 hours or less.  I was curious between the heat up time difference of a 36" x 36" floor vs a 48" x 48".  I'd love to do a 48x48 but I know the heat up time will rise.  I'm probably going to use wood or lump charcoal, but that's just because I've gotten used to using lump for the Ooni, but I'd probably use wood now.  As long as I can fit a 18"-22" pizza I'd be happy, but a turkey or something would be fun.  I'm definitely thinking a Scott style oven, but with a wider door.  I need to decide if I'd be doing a dome or flat ceiling.  I'm also thinking there should be a door archway with a ridge for sealing off the oven heat, and have the flue above that archway.  https://www.flickr.com/photos/climbhipa/3804362425/in/album-72157613634415857/ is probably what I'll end up building.

1. Insulation board by itself is good. 2 inches in the minimum recommendation. I copied an idea to use perlcrete as an added insulation and if a little water got it, it would hang out in the perlcrete and not the board. To form the perlcrete, I made a box out of 2x4s and locked it to the slab using scrap wood and tapcon screws. I filled in and smoothed the top of the perlcrete layer with fire clay. The board went in pretty level

2. I didn't put anything over the loose perlite. Once everything was framed and the walls were up, I poured in the loose perlite. A few hours later the plywood for the roof was up and covered with snow/ice barrier. I kept a tarp over the chimney until the shingles and flashing were up. That was only a few days later.

3. I think rebar is a good idea in slabs. I went overkill on mine. The bottom slab is tied into the walls and that bar ties into the top slab. Add on the steel framing and I built a fortress.

Not sure on the stand dimensions but I think it would be easier to frame the top slab than add fill. The lower face of the top slab does not need to be level, just the top. Around the inside of the block, I attached 2x4s with tapcon screws. I made a cross brace with a 2x6 and supported a in the corners and middle with extra concrete block and wood shims. I attached a few pictures to clarify.

Edit: I also had the top slab overhang the concrete block. I did that by screwing 2x6 pieces to the block with tapcons and the attaching 2x8s to those pieces to form and level the top of the slab. Those were attached with deck screws and supported to the lower slab in a few places with 2x4s. (End edit)

I have to agree with Craig's advice. You don't want to be deciding on what style of oven you are building during the build.


Thank you and thank you for the pictures!

1.  That's awesome.  Now from what I've seen, the perlcrete mix stays pretty coarse and looks like oatmeal before it cures.  Is that how it usually is?  The bread earth and fire book instructions are to fill the block stand with gravel 12 inches from the top of the block caps, and the final 12 inches consist of 10 inches of dry perlite and then 2 inches of perlite and Portland cement.  I guess the perlite/cement mix or perlcrete could be the base for the board, but using fire clay to smooth it out is a good idea.  Or I could do the wood framing as you did.  Wood frame would save me some money, but I've never done it before.

2.  That's sounds perfect and I'm thinking of using shingles and flashing.

3.  Always good to be safe with the block!  This is definitely a concern for me.  My idea is to fill every other block or corners with rebar and pour concrete into them, and then maybe also stucco the outside and inside with surface bonding cement. 

4.  I like how you had it over hang the block.  This eliminates the need for block caps and looks good.

Yup you're both very right and I'm zeroing in here.  I went to the local brick and stone shop around here and they did have an oven kit that had the dimensions I was looking for.  Of course it would need the block stand and it uses mortar in between the firebricks in the floor, and concrete walls.  Seems that both are a bad idea.  It is nice how everything is measured though, but for $2,200 I think mortaring firebrick and installing a flue and chimney would be worth the savings.  I'd just have to pay my mason friend to help with a domed ceiling.  I really feel like the Scott oven at https://www.flickr.com/photos/climbhipa/3804362425/in/album-72157613634415857/ is what I had in mind. The oven opening might be constructed with with a flat angle iron so the door can be kept as a rectangle.  I'd just have to have a steel door fabricated to keep out mice, and a wood bake door.  I think it would be cool to have a thermometer build into the bake door and maybe the steel door.  I've seen steel fire doors with a slot on the bottom used, or just no door at all while the fire is roaring.  How do you feel about using a fire door vs open oven opening while firing?  Also, you always want the wind to blow against the back of the oven correct?  I find the only thing odd about Scott style ovens are that the flue is inside the cooking chamber vs outside the chamber.  I would think a lot of heat would escape.
« Last Edit: May 03, 2019, 11:35:47 PM by Pod4477 »

Offline Jon in Albany

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #84 on: May 03, 2019, 11:53:55 PM »
I wouldn't say perlcrete is like oatmeal. I'd say it's more like a popcorn ceiling. It looks like it will always flake and the it really starts to cure out and gets more solid.

If you were going to put a full foot of perlite/perlcrete under the floor you could probably skip the board.

I was able to save some board and used it to insulate my oven door. Definitely avoid having your oven door facing the primary wind direction.  Just my two cents on door height...design the oven for its main purpose. For Thanksgiving I spatchcocked the turkey. Came out great.

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Offline Pod4477

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #85 on: May 04, 2019, 01:06:42 AM »
I wouldn't say perlcrete is like oatmeal. I'd say it's more like a popcorn ceiling. It looks like it will always flake and the it really starts to cure out and gets more solid.

If you were going to put a full foot of perlite/perlcrete under the floor you could probably skip the board.

I was able to save some board and used it to insulate my oven door. Definitely avoid having your oven door facing the primary wind direction.  Just my two cents on door height...design the oven for its main purpose. For Thanksgiving I spatchcocked the turkey. Came out great.
Thank you.  That makes more sense and the sketch below shows board, but maybe I will just do the foot of perlcrete.  That's a good idea about the board for the door.  Are the insulation boards at Lowes, or are they specialty?

Good point about the door and that's perfect spatchcocking turkey, especially with door heights.  I made the sketch below for a rough design of a square oven.  I may make it have rounded side walls and maybe back wall.  I know a circle is best, but I'm just thinking of ease of doing square.  I may build a chimney and flue in the front or just put a flue up.  I do like the look of a chimney in front though.  The oven opening is large, but I could use a steel door to keep the heat in.  I am thinking a dome would be good for the ceiling to keep more heat in as well, but do you think a flat ceiling would work?
« Last Edit: May 04, 2019, 01:23:51 AM by Pod4477 »

Offline Jackitup

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #86 on: May 04, 2019, 01:16:07 AM »
It might be worth restating/clarifying exactly what you want to accomplish with the oven: pizza style(s), bake temps, warm up time, fuel type, foods other than pizza?, etc. Giving suggestions on a door design or how to hang a flat roof are one thing. The questions you are asking now really require for you to settle in on a set of operating specifications first.

GREAT post! Don't make it a one trick pony, this post should bounce around in your head for awhile! Foods other than pizza.....no small thing!
Jon

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Offline Pod4477

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #87 on: May 04, 2019, 08:16:16 AM »
GREAT post! Don't make it a one trick pony, this post should bounce around in your head for awhile! Foods other than pizza.....no small thing!

This is true and you're right.  I feel like the oven opening should be a bit taller than I figured, in order to maneuver different foods in and out, such as a big roast.  I usually do bread, cast iron pans for various dishes, and I'm thinking definitely a turkey and rib roast with this oven.  I also like to do Bertuccis copycat Tuscan wings in the Ooni Pro.  I'm still going to use my Ooni when I want a quicker heat up time, but I'd like to have more cooking area with a permanent oven.  I read: http://www.hearthmasters.net/uploads/Ovenportfolio.pdf and I found the construction interesting.  What do you guys think of their use of a concrete lintel over the block?  Doesn't seem quite as structurally sound just from the use of mortar instead of a solid slab.  Then they used insulation board, followed by clay/sand and then firebrick.  So the clay/sand mix made from mortar sand, fireclay, and water is used just to keep the firebrick in place and level?  I've seen this omitted, but I know you mentioned fireclay, Jon.  I also wonder if the chimney and front walkway can all be red clay bricks, since they aren't going to take the brunt of the flames, unless the door is open.
« Last Edit: May 04, 2019, 08:43:17 AM by Pod4477 »

Offline Jon in Albany

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #88 on: May 04, 2019, 09:41:49 AM »
The insulation I used was specialty. It's good to something like 1700 or 1800 degrees.

I dont know about the differences between a flat or domed roof in a square oven. I know differences in their heights will matter, but not sure how big an impact something like an inch would have.

Offline Pod4477

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #89 on: May 04, 2019, 02:01:01 PM »
The insulation I used was specialty. It's good to something like 1700 or 1800 degrees.

I dont know about the differences between a flat or domed roof in a square oven. I know differences in their heights will matter, but not sure how big an impact something like an inch would have.

Thank you.  What's the best insulation board to buy?  I found, https://www.fornobravo.com/store/fb-board-36242/ and it mentioned non reactive to moisture which seems good.  I'm thinking I will either do the perlcrete slab with no board, or concrete slab and the board.  I'll have to make up for a 2" FB board gap if I don't use FB board under the landing.  Yup me too about the roof.  I see that a typical Naples oven is listed around 15" on the Forno Bravo instructions.  This seems like a good height if using a dome.
« Last Edit: May 04, 2019, 02:06:12 PM by Pod4477 »

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Offline Jon in Albany

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #90 on: May 04, 2019, 02:32:57 PM »
Thank you.  What's the best insulation board to buy?  I found, https://www.fornobravo.com/store/fb-board-36242/ and it mentioned non reactive to moisture which seems good.  I'm thinking I will either do the perlcrete slab with no board, or concrete slab and the board.  I'll have to make up for a 2" FB board gap if I don't use FB board under the landing.  Yup me too about the roof.  I see that a typical Naples oven is listed around 15" on the Forno Bravo instructions.  This seems like a good height if using a dome.
Best board...couldn't say. Lots of materials will do. I found several types in a few price ranges. Some required shipping that made them too expensive. I went with Harbison Walker because I was able to pick up the board and blanket from their Buffalo location while I was out that way and several builds had successful used it at Forno Bravo. That was my main thinking behind it. I'd start by looking at what you could get within driving distance.

Not sure where in MA you are but Sheffield Pottery is a place I found looking at stuff. Googling kiln insulation or refractory insulation in MA should get you a few places to call for more information and recommendations on materials.

Offline Pod4477

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #91 on: May 04, 2019, 05:09:32 PM »
Best board...couldn't say. Lots of materials will do. I found several types in a few price ranges. Some required shipping that made them too expensive. I went with Harbison Walker because I was able to pick up the board and blanket from their Buffalo location while I was out that way and several builds had successful used it at Forno Bravo. That was my main thinking behind it. I'd start by looking at what you could get within driving distance.

Not sure where in MA you are but Sheffield Pottery is a place I found looking at stuff. Googling kiln insulation or refractory insulation in MA should get you a few places to call for more information and recommendations on materials.

1.  Thank you! It could be worth the drive to Sheffield.  I really appreciate it.  I was thinking of avoiding shipping if possible for the board and blanket.  If it becomes too expensive I guess I could just do the 10" of dry perlite and the 2" of perlcement/perlcrete.  So I'm guessing you I would spread the fire clay mix on top of the perlcrete for a more level surface for the firebrick?

2.  Also, I put down the first course of block and there is still that one high spot by about a half an inch maybe, on the slab I was worried about.  I noticed it after my friend left and figured I could sand it down, but now I wonder.  I'm thinking of the best way to solve this. I could try to sand or angle grind the concrete, but that will take a while, or I could sand down or cut the bottom of the block.  I was also thinking I could sand the top of the block that becomes raised and that should level it for the second course.  This seems like the best way but not sure.  What do you think would be the best remedy for this?  Most of the slab is fine, but it's just on one side of the course.
« Last Edit: May 04, 2019, 05:13:00 PM by Pod4477 »

Offline Jon in Albany

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #92 on: May 04, 2019, 09:02:45 PM »


1.  Thank you! It could be worth the drive to Sheffield.  I really appreciate it.  I was thinking of avoiding shipping if possible for the board and blanket.  If it becomes too expensive I guess I could just do the 10" of dry perlite and the 2" of perlcement/perlcrete.  So I'm guessing you I would spread the fire clay mix on top of the perlcrete for a more level surface for the firebrick?

2.  Also, I put down the first course of block and there is still that one high spot by about a half an inch maybe, on the slab I was worried about.  I noticed it after my friend left and figured I could sand it down, but now I wonder.  I'm thinking of the best way to solve this. I could try to sand or angle grind the concrete, but that will take a while, or I could sand down or cut the bottom of the block.  I was also thinking I could sand the top of the block that becomes raised and that should level it for the second course.  This seems like the best way but not sure.  What do you think would be the best remedy for this?  Most of the slab is fine, but it's just on one side of the course.

1. Might be good materials closer to you than Sheffield. I was going to make the drive and then found good fireclay about 5 miles from home. I got my perlite from a garden supply store in 6 cu ft bags. I think they were $50 each. I spread some the fireclay for a good base for board. I didn't want any perlcrete poking into the board. I also used some for leveling the oven floor but I might be a unique case because there were different types of flooring materials. It was more about getting them level than the board...hopefully that makes sense. So if you need leveling material, fireclay is fine at WFO temps. Maybe you will not need the leveling material.

2. As for the block, I'd grind the bottom of your block to get it close. Just how I would tackle it.

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #93 on: May 05, 2019, 12:40:39 AM »
Scribing is a good skill to have to fit things together well. I think if you watch this video and use your imagination you will be able to transfer the line representing the top of your concrete pad to the bottom edge of your block, then grind to that. Its too bad you have this problem but I think your smartest move is to get it worked out on the bottom of the first course. Set the scribe close so you are taking little or no material from the block that will be sitting on parts of the pad that are already the correct elevation. You have some room to play with in the dimension (height) of your mortar beneath the first course, meaning the mortar you lay on the pad to set the first course on.


Set a level line where the top of course 1 needs to be. Do a dryfit and see if it looks like a standard mortar joint can make that happen. If not, lower the lime slightly. Then build to the line (string).


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Offline foreplease

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #94 on: May 05, 2019, 12:46:51 AM »
Idea 2: start at each corner and build toward, but stop short of, the high spot in your pad. When those blocks are set and the mortar set up, use plywood or lumber cut to the right height and create a form using the outside edges of the blocks you already laid. Then pour concrete in that section where block would be too high. Finish such that the top of you pour is level with the tops of the blocks on either side. Stick a couple pieces of rebar in the wet concrete that protrude up a couple block heights to tie everything together.
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Offline Pod4477

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #95 on: May 05, 2019, 02:56:49 AM »

1. Might be good materials closer to you than Sheffield. I was going to make the drive and then found good fireclay about 5 miles from home. I got my perlite from a garden supply store in 6 cu ft bags. I think they were $50 each. I spread some the fireclay for a good base for board. I didn't want any perlcrete poking into the board. I also used some for leveling the oven floor but I might be a unique case because there were different types of flooring materials. It was more about getting them level than the board...hopefully that makes sense. So if you need leveling material, fireclay is fine at WFO temps. Maybe you will not need the leveling material.

2. As for the block, I'd grind the bottom of your block to get it close. Just how I would tackle it.

haha sorry I just love numbering systems since I ask a ton of questions.  I hope there are some close materials.  I'm glad you were able to find fireclay close to home, and hope I do too.  I'm sure there are most of the materials in supply shops that I never even knew about :-D.  Such as the fabricator; I had no idea about that place.  That was my best guess as to why people use fireclay, as a leveling material I was assuming.  It was a good idea using it to prevent the perlcrete from puncturing the board.  I feel like the board is going to be tough to find and I'll need to check for perlite from a garden shop too; we have a nice one near my house.  Thank you! 

UPDATE: So as the daylight faded and just as the Bruins game started, I decided to take my angle grinder and diamond blade and just smooth out the slab.  There were some high (and low) spots from my friend that I had to level, but also, (not sure if I mentioned this) last week I did some patch work to try to level out some of the low spots on the other side, but I did a bad job grading the concrete patching.  I knew how to correct it though and unfortunately, the block has to be put exactly on the line where the patch work begins  :-D.  The patching bonded beautifully last week, and as I ground it down, I was amazed at how strong of a bond this stuff really made.  I was able to smooth out the patching and even keep some patching that helped build up some really low spots. I got the block pretty level now.  There may still be some more to do on another side, but it came out good.  I just figured last week to patch it since I didn't think using a ton of mortar for really low spots was a good idea.  I could be wrong though, but I'm happy with how it is now and it's probably the best it could be.  My friend did a good job on the slab though and mixed about 30 bags; I'm definitely happy not having to do that. 

Scribing is a good skill to have to fit things together well. I think if you watch this video and use your imagination you will be able to transfer the line representing the top of your concrete pad to the bottom edge of your block, then grind to that. Its too bad you have this problem but I think your smartest move is to get it worked out on the bottom of the first course. Set the scribe close so you are taking little or no material from the block that will be sitting on parts of the pad that are already the correct elevation. You have some room to play with in the dimension (height) of your mortar beneath the first course, meaning the mortar you lay on the pad to set the first course on.


Set a level line where the top of course 1 needs to be. Do a dryfit and see if it looks like a standard mortar joint can make that happen. If not, lower the lime slightly. Then build to the line (string).




Ah yes thank you! I remember using one years ago! This brings back memories and is a really awesome idea for tracing out bottom of the block.  So it basically sketches out the surface of one material onto another, if I remember correctly.  So the block would be like the wood in the video, and the slab would be like the wall?  I'd just run the close scribe across the slab and the side the block, I assume.  Thank you for these tips, including using the line. 

Also, good idea with idea 2.  I'm trying to picture it as I'm still a novice, but are you saying to use wood to mirror the uneven block opposite of it, and use the uneven block as pretty much a built in frame?

Offline foreplease

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #96 on: May 05, 2019, 08:24:26 AM »
Yes, I think you have it in both examples. Not sure about the word mirror but if you think of it as the area of missing block to be poured with concrete, the two long sides are formed by the plywood and each end is framed by an 8 x 8 block end (not end block).
-Tony

Offline Pod4477

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #97 on: May 05, 2019, 01:04:39 PM »
Yes, I think you have it in both examples. Not sure about the word mirror but if you think of it as the area of missing block to be poured with concrete, the two long sides are formed by the plywood and each end is framed by an 8 x 8 block end (not end block).
Awesome! haha probably not mirror, but opposite might be a better word.  That is a good idea thank you.  Hopefully I can get the first course level tomorrow.  I'll need to pick up some mortar, but as it is now, they may only need mortar under the right half of some of the block, as they are pretty level after last night.  I'll have to double check though. 

I'm thinking of doing the whole front piece out of clay brick including a chimney vent, or maybe a small chimney.  I just need to figure out how I'll do the whole vent and doorway.  I'm leaning towards an angle iron for over the doorway.

Offline foreplease

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #98 on: May 05, 2019, 01:28:09 PM »
This might be a good time to post some photos before anything else becomes permanent.
-Tony

Offline Pod4477

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #99 on: May 05, 2019, 02:02:15 PM »
This might be a good time to post some photos before anything else becomes permanent.

You're right and I'll take some of the first course.  I'm assuming giving the block a few inches from the edge of the slab is fine?  Also, I'm thinking of using a steel flue system because I'm thinking about rain and catching embers that float up.  But most rain would only get into the landing, so I may just do clay liner with a chimney cap.  Forno Bravo recommends 8" diameter for this size oven, I believe.  The landing I have drawn has a 9" depth.  I ran an angle iron across the oven opening in the model.  I'm thinking either domed ceiling or flat with angle irons, and the landing would basically just be a chimney or support for a flue.  Note: in the model I have the 2" board in red under the firebrick, but obviously that would have to be covered or I may not use it if I use perlcrete under the fireclay the firebrick will sit on.

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