A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Author Topic: Traveling with dough  (Read 399 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline wwpizza

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 9
  • Location: New Jersey
  • I Love Pizza!
Traveling with dough
« on: June 29, 2022, 04:09:33 PM »
I am driving 3-4 hours this weekend to be with some of my family and wanted to take along my dough mid cold proof.

Here is my typical dough process

00 Flour
62% Hydration
0.25% ADY
3% Salt

72 hr cold bulk proof
ball
2 hour room temperature proof
stretch and launch

what will happen to the bulk dough out of the fridge for 3-4 hours?
Any recommendations how to travel with dough?

Offline 9slicePie

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 790
Re: Traveling with dough
« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2022, 04:14:04 PM »
In for answers.
La ilahe illAllaah, Muhammedur-Rasulullaah
(There is no diety other than Allaah, Muhammed is the Messenger of Allaah)

Offline Pizza_Not_War

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 3217
  • Location: Portland OR
Re: Traveling with dough
« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2022, 04:19:40 PM »
Cooler and ice packs.

Offline wwpizza

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 9
  • Location: New Jersey
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Traveling with dough
« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2022, 04:46:40 PM »
Cooler and ice packs.
Thanks, This is what I will probably end up doing.

Offline Jon in Albany

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3100
  • Location: Albany, NY
    • Jon In Albany Blog
Re: Traveling with dough
« Reply #4 on: June 29, 2022, 07:51:20 PM »
I think it would probably be best if the dough didn't touch the ice packs. I keep dough in bags and I think that could create a weirdness with one side of the dough ball being much colder than the other. Might not be as big a deal with individual plastic containers. Even so, I think I would try to limit direct contact so a container wall that has dough on one side doesn't touch a cold pack directly on the other side.

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Offline wwpizza

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 9
  • Location: New Jersey
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Traveling with dough
« Reply #5 on: June 30, 2022, 10:18:18 AM »
I think it would probably be best if the dough didn't touch the ice packs. I keep dough in bags and I think that could create a weirdness with one side of the dough ball being much colder than the other. Might not be as big a deal with individual plastic containers. Even so, I think I would try to limit direct contact so a container wall that has dough on one side doesn't touch a cold pack directly on the other side.
Thanks for pointing that out, I will definitely take that into consideration.

Offline tracy

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 116
  • Location: Oklahoma
Re: Traveling with dough
« Reply #6 on: June 30, 2022, 11:02:26 AM »
I transported frozen dough for ~9 hours this past Christmas.  I usually bench proof and then cold ferment for several days.  I treated the dough as usual for through the bench proof and then froze it in balls.  I then got a cooler and dry ice and made sure the frozen dough was cold.  Then when I got to my destination, I put the balls in the fridge and allowed them to thaw and then continue cold fermenting as usually.  The end result was pretty similar to my normal, unfrozen dough, so that's my suggestion.

Offline Betth

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 7
  • Location: US
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Traveling with dough
« Reply #7 on: July 28, 2022, 05:13:26 AM »
I transported frozen dough for ~9 hours this past Christmas.  I usually bench proof and then cold ferment for several days.  I treated the dough as usual for through the bench proof and then froze it in balls.  I then got a cooler and dry ice and made sure the frozen dough was cold.  Then when I got to my destination, I put the balls in the fridge and allowed them to thaw and then continue cold fermenting as usually.  The end result was pretty similar to my normal, unfrozen dough, so that's my suggestion.

wow 9 hours! This is a useful advice. I haven't thought that travelling with dough is not very difficult

A D V E R T I S E M E N T