A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Author Topic: What technique/recipe produces cornicione this high?  (Read 691 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline guynel

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 5
  • Location: Israel
  • I Love Pizza!
What technique/recipe produces cornicione this high?
« on: November 18, 2022, 08:52:37 AM »
On my Instagram feed I run into a lot of great doughs, but I was intrigued by what I came across today - this guy seems to consistently produce cornicione roughly twice the size of pretty much any other pie I know. Example image attached, but his profile is full of additional examples:
https://www.instagram.com/p/CkIlhf_Nmi-/
Is this an ingredients thing? Technique? Oven? I'm wondering if anyone can shed some light on how this is achieved?

Thanks in advance for any ideas

Offline HansB

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 7039
  • Location: Detroit, MI
Re: What technique/recipe produces cornicione this high?
« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2022, 08:58:32 AM »
Google: Canotto
Instagram @hans_michigan.

"The most important element of pizza is the dough. Pizza is bread after all. Bread with toppings." -Brian Spangler

"Ultimately, pizza is a variety of condiments on top of bread. If I wanted to evolve, I figured out that I had to understand bread and first make the best bread I possibly could. Only then could my pizza evolve as well." Dan Richer

Offline stiks47

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 68
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: What technique/recipe produces cornicione this high?
« Reply #2 on: December 05, 2022, 12:21:44 AM »
Nuvola or super nuvola flour

Online scott r

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 5870
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Boston
  • I Love Pizzafreaks!
Re: What technique/recipe produces cornicione this high?
« Reply #3 on: December 05, 2022, 09:25:03 AM »
Most making canotto style probably are using Nuvolo Super, but after doing a lot of testing with that flour, it isn't the magic bullet here.   I can make pizzas just as puffy with all trumps or any other American high gluten flour.  The difference with that flour is that while it will produce dough with that amount of lift, Nuvolo will be a little bit more tender than the others, more like a lower protein flour. 

The way to get that puffy high cornicione is high hydration and fairly high heat along with the most important factor here.... a strong dough.  Most of this style are made with a Biga.

Offline jma6610

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 52
  • Location: Gold Coast, Australia
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: What technique/recipe produces cornicione this high?
« Reply #4 on: December 06, 2022, 09:39:29 PM »
Most making canotto style probably are using Nuvolo Super, but after doing a lot of testing with that flour, it isn't the magic bullet here.   I can make pizzas just as puffy with all trumps or any other American high gluten flour.  The difference with that flour is that while it will produce dough with that amount of lift, Nuvolo will be a little bit more tender than the others, more like a lower protein flour. 

The way to get that puffy high cornicione is high hydration and fairly high heat along with the most important factor here.... a strong dough.  Most of this style are made with a Biga.

Yup - I've been experimenting with Nuvolo Super myself and as you've mentioned it's not the magic bullet. I'm still not convinced that biga (or similar) is the magic bullet either, but there are several who claim it is. Some claim that the use of a sponge with around 50% of so of hydration (rather than biga's more typical 45%) that is fermented for a day before the main dough is mixed is a major assistance. I'm going to mess with this on my next batch this weekend.


A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Offline Travinos_Pizza

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 592
  • Age: 30
  • Location: Ohio
  • Sono Travis. Il mio ristorante Ť Travinoís Pizza
    • Travino's Pizza
Re: What technique/recipe produces cornicione this high?
« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2022, 08:49:18 AM »
Yup - I've been experimenting with Nuvolo Super myself and as you've mentioned it's not the magic bullet. I'm still not convinced that biga (or similar) is the magic bullet either, but there are several who claim it is. Some claim that the use of a sponge with around 50% of so of hydration (rather than biga's more typical 45%) that is fermented for a day before the main dough is mixed is a major assistance. I'm going to mess with this on my next batch this weekend.

I would imagine that itís the hydration youíre stating it is. From the picture that looks like it will instantly flop when picked up as it seems almost razor thin up to the cornicione.

- Travis

A D V E R T I S E M E N T