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Author Topic: My crazy idea for starting a mini part time business. Looking for feedback  (Read 7758 times)

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Offline Yael

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This is a work in progress of my 1st menu, it's 2 sided with more pizzas on the back and a this is who I am statement I wrote. Anywho, I think I'm kind of over the top with the number of sauces, cheese, toppings basically everything. Once I get it finalized I'm going to have it printed on thick cardstock and give it out to my neighbors and friends. Perhaps if I keep it to people I know I can operate below the radar and go unnoticed and still have enough business to stay busy for my couple o' hours a day.

Any feedback on the menu would be wonderful.

About the design:
A black contour around the white font would be better. Thin white font on grey background isn't clear enough, IMO. But I like the overall idea.
Is "red" the exact word for a ginger beard in English? I'm not a native English speaker, so when I see "red" with the orange color, I'm surprised. Wait, wasn't it the name of a pirate? Anyway, wouldn't it be more accurate to draw a red beard? (if it's a stupid remark, just skip  ;D)

About the content:
If I planned to make 10 pizzas/day, I would suggest 4, or 5 pizzas tops... Maybe one less classic changing every month ("pizza of the month", something like that). It seems to me there are too many ingredients for such a short daily opening. You should optimize this. If you make 10 pizzas/day, don't give customers the opportunity to make you make all of them, it'll be better to make 4 pepperoni, 3 margherita, and 3 4-cheeses (you'll make them quicker; you'll have less waste; and you may get lower prices for the raw material (the more you buy the cheaper you get)).
That's what I think about for now.
“Learn the rules like a pro so you can break them like an artist” - Pablo Picasso

Offline Quebert

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About the design:
A black contour around the white font would be better. Thin white font on grey background isn't clear enough, IMO. But I like the overall idea.
Is "red" the exact word for a ginger beard in English? I'm not a native English speaker, so when I see "red" with the orange color, I'm surprised. Wait, wasn't it the name of a pirate? Anyway, wouldn't it be more accurate to draw a red beard? (if it's a stupid remark, just skip  ;D)

About the content:
If I planned to make 10 pizzas/day, I would suggest 4, or 5 pizzas tops... Maybe one less classic changing every month ("pizza of the month", something like that). It seems to me there are too many ingredients for such a short daily opening. You should optimize this. If you make 10 pizzas/day, don't give customers the opportunity to make you make all of them, it'll be better to make 4 pepperoni, 3 margherita, and 3 4-cheeses (you'll make them quicker; you'll have less waste; and you may get lower prices for the raw material (the more you buy the cheaper you get)).
That's what I think about for now.


HUMMMM GOOD EYE! I looked again and the beard's orange, I googled redbeard for a clipart pic and that came up, so I guess my brain saw it as red. I have red hair so some people call me redbeard, I don't even know if that's what I'll go with for a name. I don't like it, but I don't like anything I've came up with lol. It's funny how you brought up the pizza of a month, I've been kicking around the idea of doing 1 specialty pizza a month.  Your idea's perfect thank you. I always want to over-do things, and I think this was a good example.  Removing the build your own was solid advice. I need to keep it simple and work at making what I offer the best I can.

The font thing I'll have to play with it and see what looks easy to read. I did fix the beard color (thank you!)

Offline Andrew t

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Quebert-
First off, good for you dreaming and having the guts to put it out there. I launched a pop up/ caterng pizza business last year as a boot leg operation and went legal a month ago.

You're lucky to be in Riverside, it's the only county so far to implement MEKO (micro enterprise home kitchen operations) in CA. It's restrictied but has much lower barriers to entry than full blown catering operation and can be operated out of your home.

Cooks' Allience and Foodnome wokr in this space helping the community. I recomend them for information and classes.

My operation is a pop up 1-2 days a week at a local brewery. I have a catering permit and use a rental kitchen 3-4 hours per week for prep. I have a great day job in the food business and this is only a side project.

My opening permits/insurance costs are almost $1000 per year and my kitchen rental is $25/hr. A MEHKO should run $300ish for the permit and $300ish for insurance.

A few flaws I see in your assumptions/pans are-

The caluculations on avaliable and willing customers in the 2 mile radius does not pencil. The question is not just how many there are but how ofter they will order (frequency) and how to reah them (marketing). If you plan to launch as preorder with timeslots consider starting with 1 night per week, add more as needed.

$10 gross profit per pizza seems unrealistic. My pizza cost me $3-5 in product, paper, fuel. My average sale is $16-17. So far my operatating expence has been averaging another $3-5 per pizza sold. I'm only counting on $5 per pizza for my labor. On the micro scale it's not the cost per pizza ( marginal unit cost) but the weekly cash flow in an out. I may spend $150-200 per week on product but that includes waste and unsold product. Without high volume theoretial food costing doesn't provide a clear picture of true costs.

If you'd like to make $500 per week by working 30 hours (4 hours service, 1 hour prep, 1 hour shopping/cleaning) there are more feliable ways to do it...Uber comes to mind.

If you love making pizza AND also love building the business it's worth it. I love operations- shopping, working with partners to book events, prepping, making and serving pizza, hanging out with guests, set up and clean up. The not as fun parts that I spend as much time doing are figuring out the BS govenrment regualtion, accounting/banking/taxes and marketing/social media.

I'm hoping once I get the not as fun parts as smoothly operating as the pizza/cooking/sevice end it won't be so bad. I have however learned to 'eat my vegetables' so to speak and am finding satisfaction in having all the paperwork ducks in a row.

Again, good luck, start small and start. Kinda ramblem,,,sorry

Some other people to learn from and about are Paulie G (the serious eats podcast is great) and Emillia's in Oakland. I'm always looking for more examples of 1-2 person operations.


 

Offline Chicago Bob

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Bake it and they will come.... Drop that delivery idea, it's a downer to your bottom line.   :pizza:

Pass out the menus.... They'll be so curious they can't help themselves (good thing) an word of mouth is powerful. You are trying too hard to please... Once word is out they'll line up down your street. 🌴

Keep it simple....
« Last Edit: May 24, 2020, 10:31:39 PM by Chicago Bob »
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Offline Quebert

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Quebert-
First off, good for you dreaming and having the guts to put it out there. I launched a pop up/ caterng pizza business last year as a boot leg operation and went legal a month ago.

You're lucky to be in Riverside, it's the only county so far to implement MEKO (micro enterprise home kitchen operations) in CA. It's restrictied but has much lower barriers to entry than full blown catering operation and can be operated out of your home.

Cooks' Allience and Foodnome wokr in this space helping the community. I recomend them for information and classes.

My operation is a pop up 1-2 days a week at a local brewery. I have a catering permit and use a rental kitchen 3-4 hours per week for prep. I have a great day job in the food business and this is only a side project.

My opening permits/insurance costs are almost $1000 per year and my kitchen rental is $25/hr. A MEHKO should run $300ish for the permit and $300ish for insurance.

A few flaws I see in your assumptions/pans are-

The caluculations on avaliable and willing customers in the 2 mile radius does not pencil. The question is not just how many there are but how ofter they will order (frequency) and how to reah them (marketing). If you plan to launch as preorder with timeslots consider starting with 1 night per week, add more as needed.

$10 gross profit per pizza seems unrealistic. My pizza cost me $3-5 in product, paper, fuel. My average sale is $16-17. So far my operatating expence has been averaging another $3-5 per pizza sold. I'm only counting on $5 per pizza for my labor. On the micro scale it's not the cost per pizza ( marginal unit cost) but the weekly cash flow in an out. I may spend $150-200 per week on product but that includes waste and unsold product. Without high volume theoretial food costing doesn't provide a clear picture of true costs.

If you'd like to make $500 per week by working 30 hours (4 hours service, 1 hour prep, 1 hour shopping/cleaning) there are more feliable ways to do it...Uber comes to mind.

If you love making pizza AND also love building the business it's worth it. I love operations- shopping, working with partners to book events, prepping, making and serving pizza, hanging out with guests, set up and clean up. The not as fun parts that I spend as much time doing are figuring out the BS govenrment regualtion, accounting/banking/taxes and marketing/social media.

I'm hoping once I get the not as fun parts as smoothly operating as the pizza/cooking/sevice end it won't be so bad. I have however learned to 'eat my vegetables' so to speak and am finding satisfaction in having all the paperwork ducks in a row.

Again, good luck, start small and start. Kinda ramblem,,,sorry

Some other people to learn from and about are Paulie G (the serious eats podcast is great) and Emillia's in Oakland. I'm always looking for more examples of 1-2 person operations.

You're literally the 1st person ever to tell me I'm lucky to be in Riverside, I understand your context but it was still weird to hear lol. I'll probably start bootleg myself for awhile.  Thankfully, it sounds like doing this in Riverside will a lot cheaper than if I was in OC/LA/SD.  As for the money, I know I won't make as much as I projected to myself, there's always more costs then I factor in. Then I'll have pizzas I ruin and have to toss, propane, and little things here and there. I could do Uber eats, not sure how much they make but I've heard it isn't much in most areas. I can't do regular Uber, I have a roadster and they require you have a 4 door car.  I want to do this for the fun of doing something different that I enjoy, any cash made's just icing on the cake.  I do like Chicago Bob's suggestion. Doing it one night a week to start's a great idea too, I have Square for my other business so people could pay with a CC. I know a lot of people tend to not carry around cash. I think I'll make it for the 1st month your 1st pizzas free. People can try and if they like it they'll come back and I'll start making $$$.

And thanks to Yael my brain's learning to think less is more menu wise. My original menu had 16 different pizzas. I got it down to 9 now, still too many but it's getting there.  I can't find 00 online for a good price shipped, and the only local place that has it, $4.50 for a 2.2lb bag. They're out now, and don't always restock it fast. Even if they always had it, that's way too much $$$. So for the time being I'll be using the 50# high gluten I can always get and make NY style. Which everyone around here seems to love any ways. Most have never had a Neapolitan pizza. NY's are a lot longer bake time, but making maybe a dozen pizzas with no delivery it would probably even out.  I think 3-4 hours 1 evening a week until I get popular enough to add a 2nd would be great. Word of mouth's already working. I'd literally be happy making pizzas and clearing $120 for the day. I'm simple like that. And if it never gets more popular than 1 night, I can still have fun and make pizzas and put a little change in my pocket.
« Last Edit: May 25, 2020, 05:07:41 AM by Quebert »

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Offline Quebert

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About the design:
A black contour around the white font would be better. Thin white font on grey background isn't clear enough, IMO. But I like the overall idea.
Is "red" the exact word for a ginger beard in English? I'm not a native English speaker, so when I see "red" with the orange color, I'm surprised. Wait, wasn't it the name of a pirate? Anyway, wouldn't it be more accurate to draw a red beard? (if it's a stupid remark, just skip  ;D)

About the content:
If I planned to make 10 pizzas/day, I would suggest 4, or 5 pizzas tops... Maybe one less classic changing every month ("pizza of the month", something like that). It seems to me there are too many ingredients for such a short daily opening. You should optimize this. If you make 10 pizzas/day, don't give customers the opportunity to make you make all of them, it'll be better to make 4 pepperoni, 3 margherita, and 3 4-cheeses (you'll make them quicker; you'll have less waste; and you may get lower prices for the raw material (the more you buy the cheaper you get)).
That's what I think about for now.

Is this what you mean about the font, does it look better to you?


Offline Yael

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Quebert,

First of all, please notice that I'm not a graphist nor a designer, so my ideas may not be the best!!

My point of view about the new design:
- I like the black contour better, it's clearer;
- the red beard is actually too red... I like the orange one better, so maybe looking for a color between orange and red? (check bellow);
- don't need to write "pie" 2 times;
- maybe you can keep "all pies are hand made..." all in white, without the black contour, so you have some balance (it's not too "heavy"). The black will emphasize what you want the customer to see first, but you cannot want him to see everything at once, it's too much. Maybe choose a thinner contour for the toppings?
- detail: the 2 asterisks around the name left and right are not at the same position

- Oh and about the topping list, it seems to me a little bit "messy": you have several ingredients per line (opening with a dash), and it's not really logical (sometimes sauce + cheese, sometimes cheese + herbs...). Besides, wouldn't the customer think he can only chose one line?
I would regroup per category, one category per line (sauce - cheeses- meat -...), see if it takes too much place or if it's clearer.

I highly suggest you make a verso of this sheet (if not planned yet) and you explain who, what and why (who you are, why you do this, what ingredients you use and why).

And... that's all I think about for now  :P
« Last Edit: May 25, 2020, 09:38:11 AM by Yael »
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Offline TXCraig1

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Quote
I want to do this for the fun of doing something different that I enjoy, any cash made's just icing on the cake.

This is what I was pointing out earlier.  You don't seem to know whether you want this to be a hobby or a business. When I asked you about it a couple days ago, you replied,

Quote
I want to make money, a few hours a day and 10 pizzas I'm not going to be able to retire off it. I wouldn't be doing it just for the money, but if I could do something I enjoy and at the end of the day pocket $100 I'd consider that a good day. I am focused on doing this right.

If you don't figure this out, IMO, there is a good chance that you will not enjoy it and that you may end up loosing money too. I think you need to know which is the goal before you can set your hours or menu.

How many hours/day do you want to work? If you're planning 10 pizzas/day, with delivery, maybe you can plan for maybe 3 pies/hour? With shopping, dough making, prep, set-up, and clean-up, you're probably locked down 6+ hours/day - which may quickly become more than "a few hours a day." How long will that be fun? Add to that frustrated customers who can't get a pizza when they want it or as quickly as they want it, or who can't get the pizza they want because you're out of something (else you're throwing lots of stuff away to make sure you don't run out of slower-moving items).

You might make a list of everything that you'll have to do on a daily basis, everything that could go wrong and how you'll deal with it, and see if it's even possible for this to be fun if you're thinking about doing it more than a couple days/wk.

I think you could make money doing this, but it's a really hard way to make money if you don't need the money. If having fun is the goal, I think you'll want to be very deliberate in planning your hours/days of operation and menu.
« Last Edit: May 25, 2020, 12:59:37 PM by TXCraig1 »
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Offline texmex

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Is this what you mean about the font, does it look better to you?


Spellcheck...Calabrese, cilantro, quesadilla, queso cotija, provolone, parmesan, habanero. 
Risa sin camisa, sinvergüenza.

Offline TXCraig1

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A couple thoughts on the menu:

That's a lot of pies. My suggestion would be to start with 4-5 max. Not counting sub-ingredients, I counted ~35 ingredients on your menu. That seems like a lot to store, prep, manage. 

Pepperoni - have to have it.
Margherita - have to have it.
Quattro Formaggio - more cheese bread than pizza. My guess is you don't need this pizza. If you do, since your not doing traditional cheeses anyway, why not do LM and fresh mozz (looks like you have both already), parm, and cheddar/ That way you can ditch the ricotta (which will be a pain) and prov which you probably don't need.
Veggie Max - do you really need it, or are you trying to be all things to all people? Without this pie, you eliminate a lot of prep and a lot of ingredients that loose freshness quickly, particularly when prepped.
Big Maui - same comments as the Veggie Max. What makes it "Big?" What makes it special?
Spicy Salami - same comments as the Veggie Max. Why do you need this and the red Diavola? Of all the pies on the menu, to me, this is the one that most screams "get me off the menu."
Esquelto - another one with a lot of ingredients, including 5 orphans, and a lot of prep.
The Diavola twins - does every ingredient need to be ghost pepper? Realistically, how many of these will you sell? That's a lot of unique ingredients in those two.

My suggestion would be to figure out exactly who redbeard pizza is and start with Pepperoni, Margherita, and two pies that define Redbeard. Three at most. Make the pepperoni and margherita both "yours." Get rid of the ones that don't scream Redbeard. You can always add more later as you figure things out more. Doing a few things exceptionally well, even if you don't offer everything everyone wants, will serve you better in the long run than doing too much and not doing it as well - or worse, just being average. You're not competing with PJ's or Dominoes, so don't. If you let yourself get drawn into competition with them, you'll lose.

How are you coming up with your prices? I see you already took a price increase. How do you know what is the right price or that you're not too high/low?

One last thought, have you tested how well your pizza travels? Be sure to have your taste testers try everything you decide to menu after being held 10 minutes in whatever box/insulated bag combo you plan to use. If 3rd party delivery won't have insulated bags, be sure to test it that way too.  It's not going to be the same pizza when delivered. High temp pizza doesn't hold like an American-style gut bomb.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
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Offline Quebert

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This is what I was pointing out earlier.  You don't seem to know whether you want this to be a hobby or a business. When I asked you about it a couple days ago, you replied,

If you don't figure this out, IMO, there is a good chance that you will not enjoy it and that you may end up loosing money too. I think you need to know which is the goal before you can set your hours or menu.

How many hours/day do you want to work? If you're planning 10 pizzas/day, with delivery, maybe you can plan for maybe 3 pies/hour? With shopping, dough making, prep, set-up, and clean-up, you're probably locked down 6+ hours/day - which may quickly become more than "a few hours a day." How long will that be fun? Add to that frustrated customers who can't get a pizza when they want it or as quickly as they want it, or who can't get the pizza they want because you're out of something (else you're throwing lots of stuff away to make sure you don't run out of slower-moving items).

You might make a list of everything that you'll have to do on a daily basis, everything that could go wrong and how you'll deal with it, and see if it's even possible for this to be fun if you're thinking about doing it more than a couple days/wk.

I think you could make money doing this, but it's a really hard way to make money if you don't need the money. If having fun is the goal, I think you'll want to be very deliberate in planning your hours/days of operation and menu.

I believe I can make money doing this, it's not my goal here but if I make good pizzas people will buy them. I don't want to make 100 pizzas a month and have $150 in my pocket. But I don't want to overthink the money side. When I do a test run for a few weeks I can calculate my expenses better than just guessing, and I can figure out what to charge to make something, but not be so pricy people won't bother with me.  I do think I'll drop the delivery idea and set up shop outside my house. My neighbors won't care, especially since it won't be huge crowds of people and only a few hours a day max.  I didn't really think of that as an option but a few people mentioned here and linked to people doing it that way.

A couple thoughts on the menu:

That's a lot of pies. My suggestion would be to start with 4-5 max. Not counting sub-ingredients, I counted ~35 ingredients on your menu. That seems like a lot to store, prep, manage. 

Pepperoni - have to have it.
Margherita - have to have it.
Quattro Formaggio - more cheese bread than pizza. My guess is you don't need this pizza. If you do, since your not doing traditional cheeses anyway, why not do LM and fresh mozz (looks like you have both already), parm, and cheddar/ That way you can ditch the ricotta (which will be a pain) and prov which you probably don't need.
Veggie Max - do you really need it, or are you trying to be all things to all people? Without this pie, you eliminate a lot of prep and a lot of ingredients that loose freshness quickly, particularly when prepped.
Big Maui - same comments as the Veggie Max. What makes it "Big?" What makes it special?
Spicy Salami - same comments as the Veggie Max. Why do you need this and the red Diavola? Of all the pies on the menu, to me, this is the one that most screams "get me off the menu."
Esquelto - another one with a lot of ingredients, including 5 orphans, and a lot of prep.
The Diavola twins - does every ingredient need to be ghost pepper? Realistically, how many of these will you sell? That's a lot of unique ingredients in those two.

My suggestion would be to figure out exactly who redbeard pizza is and start with Pepperoni, Margherita, and two pies that define Redbeard. Three at most. Make the pepperoni and margherita both "yours." Get rid of the ones that don't scream Redbeard. You can always add more later as you figure things out more. Doing a few things exceptionally well, even if you don't offer everything everyone wants, will serve you better in the long run than doing too much and not doing it as well - or worse, just being average. You're not competing with PJ's or Dominoes, so don't. If you let yourself get drawn into competition with them, you'll lose.

How are you coming up with your prices? I see you already took a price increase. How do you know what is the right price or that you're not too high/low?

One last thought, have you tested how well your pizza travels? Be sure to have your taste testers try everything you decide to menu after being held 10 minutes in whatever box/insulated bag combo you plan to use. If 3rd party delivery won't have insulated bags, be sure to test it that way too.  It's not going to be the same pizza when delivered. High temp pizza doesn't hold like an American-style gut bomb.

I dropped it to 4 pizzas, and will do a rotating one monthly. I was trying to think too big, as I always do. High quality basic pizzas would work perfect here. As for the price, what I put's just kind of a placeholder to make the menu look like a menu. If it's different than the 1st menu I posted, it's because I scrapped that one and started from scratch. $15's high for a 12" compared to the chains, but I'm offering handmade pizzas that's subjectively taste better. I might have to come down some, my test run will help me figure that out. Anyone who gets a free pizza in June I'll ask them to fill out a survey on the web site, and one thing I can ask is what they'd pay for it. Just to give me a better idea of where people who've eaten the pizza head is at.  The menu needs a lot of work, especially spell checking and getting my pricing in line. 
But thanks to this thread I'm not going to be offering 16 pizzas with the option to make your own from 5,000 different ingredients. So I am VERY appreciative. That would have been the worst idea and ended up costing me all my money.   My initial thinking was, well since everyone's going to pre-order on Sunday, I'll buy just what I need for those pizzas and I won't have much waste. In hindsight not a great idea, and it wouldn't have went nearly as smoothly as in my head lol.

Offline Thicccpie

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Yeah I have to agree with the menu limits. Personally I am planning on just doing cheese, pepperoni, jalapeno and maybe one other veggie. To start I just want to do ingredients that don't require prepping beforehand.

Offline Quebert

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Well, this is a much chopped down menu.  On my block alone I'll have 4 sales a month for the pineapple pizza, wouldn't be one I'd want on the menu personally, but here on the west coast it's insanely popular so I know more people will want it.

I counted 16 core ingredients, 15 if I don't use fresh mozz for the Margherita.  5 are things I always have on hand for personal use. There are actually 18, but 2 are things used on another pizza with a bit of dried spices added to transform it.  I'm still unsure on the prices, and the only thing I might add is an option for Jalapeno. Jalapenos are dirt cheap and last forever (not pickled, fresh) And adding onions to any of the pizzas. Outside of Basil unless I go with fresh mozz I don't see anything else too perishable.  Obviously I don't want to make people pizzas with old stuff on them.  But I think I can stay on top of things.

I definitely think the 2 spicy pizzas are outlandish, I'll eat one a week, and I know a few chili heads so I guess I'll have to wait and see how big of a mistake they are.  The basic 3 should all sell well, could add a 4th cheese only for the vegetarians. I wouldn't even have to add any ingredients.

Offline Quebert

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3 pizzas, 2 additions, I think this is what people in the thread were trying to get into my head. Prices are still just so something's there, and I'm on the fence about using cheddar. I'm even kinda on the fence about the sausage pizza. If it wasn't for the sensibility of the members helping me, I would have had damn near 30 ingredients and 15 different pizzas lol.

Offline Little bean

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3 pizzas, 2 additions, I think this is what people in the thread were trying to get into my head. Prices are still just so something's there, and I'm on the fence about using cheddar. I'm even kinda on the fence about the sausage pizza. If it wasn't for the sensibility of the members helping me, I would have had damn near 30 ingredients and 15 different pizzas lol.

For sure Keep it simple. On my trailer I do a Margherita, Pepperoni and a white. These three I always have and its basically all people want anyway. If you get a bug up and feel like doing something different you can run a weekly special that you prepare a limited number of ingredients. I Can assure you with all the ingredients you were originally thinking you will either being throwing a lot of stuff in the garbage, cancelling out any profit you would be making, or being forced to sell inferior ingredients, which you should never ever do.

my ingredients selling these three pies (outside of dough)
Grande wmlm
pecorino
Grande sopraffina ricotta
Grande bocconcini fresh mozz
ciao Tomato
corto evoo
ezzo supreme pepperoni
Fresh basil
Slivered Garlic
Mikes hot honey
sea salt
fresh cracked pepper

This is a very easy lineup to maintain from week to week when you are not a full service operation. With these ingredients a special pizza is just a few additions away from happening.
« Last Edit: May 30, 2020, 11:35:39 AM by Little bean »

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Offline Quebert

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For sure Keep it simple. On my trailer I do a Margherita, Pepperoni and a white. These three I always have and its basically all people want anyway. If you get a bug up and feel like doing something different you can run a weekly special that you prepare a limited number of ingredients. I Can assure you with all the ingredients you were originally thinking you will either being throwing a lot of stuff in the garbage, cancelling out any profit you would be making, or being forced to sell inferior ingredients, which you should never ever do.

my ingredients selling these three pies (outside of dough)
Grande wmlm
pecorino
Grande sopraffina ricotta
Grande bocconcini fresh mozz
ciao Tomato
corto evoo
ezzo supreme pepperoni
Fresh basil
Slivered Garlic
Mikes hot honey
sea salt
fresh cracked pepper

This is a very easy lineup to maintain from week to week when you are not a full service operation. With these ingredients a special pizza is just a few additions away from happening.

EXCELLENT THANK YOU! That's almost exactly the lineup I got mine down to. Well, except the brands lol. I love white pizza, I should add one it would stand out. I know it's probably blasphemous around these forums to say, but I probably like a good pizza bianca as much as a regular tomato sauce one.

Offline Yael

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[...] I know it's probably blasphemous around these forums to say, but I probably like a good pizza bianca as much as a regular tomato sauce one.

IMHO, in a huge forum like this where we talk about deep dish Chicago pizza, a white NP style pizza has nothing blasphemous  :-D >:D
“Learn the rules like a pro so you can break them like an artist” - Pablo Picasso

Offline Little bean

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  • Location: Burton ohio
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IMHO, in a huge forum like this where we talk about deep dish Chicago pizza, a white NP style pizza has nothing blasphemous  :-D >:D

People are way to sensitive for me to try to define the pizza I make, weather you call it Wood Fired, Neapolitan, Neo Neapolitan, it doesn't change what it is. I think if I just say I make pizza, I will tick off less people. We are in the process of planning a pizzeria right now, and although it will have the feel of a New York shop, for fear of getting punched in the face I wouldn't call it that as there is no definition for it. We will identify as "East Coast Inspired" If anyone has a problem with that there is probably no pleasing them.

Offline TXCraig1

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Some of the best and worst Neapolitan-type pizzas I've had are white. Three of my top-5 all-time favorites are white. None of them have any sauce. The worst NP-type pies I've had are white with a sauce that had starch in it.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline Little bean

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  • Location: Burton ohio
  • Pizzeria DiLauro
    • Pizzeria DiLauro
Some of the best and worst Neapolitan-type pizzas I've had are white. Three of my top-5 all-time favorites are white. None of them have any sauce. The worst NP-type pies I've had are white with a sauce that had starch in it.

Heartily agree, no sauce on ours, just balanced combination of very smooth ricotta, pecorino and whole milk mozzarella, (less is more with the cheeses) as well as freshly slivered garlic, right over the pie, freshly cracked pepper and salt, fresh basil and a generous squeeze of olive oil. I do not prefer the Bechamel type thickened with roux. The Grande soprafinna is so smooth and creamy you can spread it as the base with a spoon right out off the tub, essentially acting as a sauce.


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