Pages:
Actions
  • #341 by steel_baker on 09 Feb 2015
  • I made three of these pizzas this weekend.  Fantastic.  Just beautiful.  Taste and texture were wonderful.  Never had VP -- I live in Idaho and grew up in Florida -- but this just blew people away.  First time I used a scale to measure ingredients and it made a huge difference.  I was a little concerned about elevation (I'm at about 3000 feet here in Boise) but I think it was fine. 

    Thank you steel_baker and other contributors in this thread -- I really appreciate it.  I'm a total cooking freak -- I cook all sorts of things from all over the world, but very little beats pizza and fried chicken, and this was a memorable pizza.  The attention to detail that you all have really makes a difference.

    A million thanks.

    rOB

    Glad you enjoyed it. It's a unique style that I grew up with. Many people who grew up in that area have tried to duplicate it for decades after growing up & leaving. I don't claim it's a perfect duplicate but I will say it's pretty damn close. The best part is that once you know how to make the dough, you can top it any way you want & develop some amazing flavor profiles.

    Keep baking!

  • #342 by woodmakesitgood on 12 Apr 2015
  • The Pig is loose!

    I had some dough that was a bit overfermented, and I thought this style might be able to work in spite of that.
    It turned out pretty good...the crust was a little more chewy this time and had a slight sourness.
    It was like a SD Victory Pig.
    (I know, its round)  ;)
  • #343 by steel_baker on 12 Apr 2015
  • Looks great. My original experiments while figuring out the dough was done in round cast iron skillets. The shape doesn't matter.

    I did a chicken fennel sausage & hatch green chile tray for this evening. Made one last evening for dinner guests & it was so good, we had to make another today! Sausage is homemade from boneless skinless chicken thighs. Grind 'em up in the food processor, add some fresh ground fennel seed to it & saute' until cooked. The green chiles are....well just cleaned & chopped roasted hatch green chiles. We buy a case every year when green chile season comes along & freeze them so we have them all year long. In addition, we infused a few ozs of EVOO with freshly chopped garlic to drizzle on to finish topping the tray.

    The richness of the sausage & the low & slow burn of the mild green chiles is pulled together by the garlic oil & creamy white cheddar. This pizza is absolutely decadent with strong flavors on a crispy crust. It's become one of our real favorites to make on the VP style crust.

  • #344 by woodmakesitgood on 12 Apr 2015
  • That flavor combo sounds delicious!
  • #345 by Johnny the Gent on 21 Apr 2015
  • That flavor combo sounds delicious!

     ^^^

     :drool: green chillies.must.get
  • #346 by steel_baker on 23 Apr 2015
  • We normally use fresh green chiles since we buy a case of fresh roasted chiles every year, but we also keep canned green chiles around. These are really great to keep in your pantry and even though they're canned, they're pretty damn good.

    http://www.hatchchileco.com/

     :)
  • #347 by Pizza Baker on 06 May 2015
  • Looks great. My original experiments while figuring out the dough was done in round cast iron skillets. The shape doesn't matter.

    I did a chicken fennel sausage & hatch green chile tray for this evening. Made one last evening for dinner guests & it was so good, we had to make another today! Sausage is homemade from boneless skinless chicken thighs. Grind 'em up in the food processor, add some fresh ground fennel seed to it & saute' until cooked. The green chiles are....well just cleaned & chopped roasted hatch green chiles. We buy a case every year when green chile season comes along & freeze them so we have them all year long. In addition, we infused a few ozs of EVOO with freshly chopped garlic to drizzle on to finish topping the tray.

    The richness of the sausage & the low & slow burn of the mild green chiles is pulled together by the garlic oil & creamy white cheddar. This pizza is absolutely decadent with strong flavors on a crispy crust. It's become one of our real favorites to make on the VP style crust.

    Wow, I'm going to try that combo. :drool:
  • #348 by mkoss on 06 Jun 2015
  • Stopped at Pizza Loven couple weeks ago on the way from bringing my daughter home from Penn State. I miss this pizza. I really need to get my butt in gear and try to make this recipe.
  • #349 by pizzabill on 19 Oct 2015
  • Thanks for all your work on these pizzas guys! I came here to learn this style so I could surprise my neighbor who grew up in Old Forge. She came over with her daughter for pizza the other night and was thrilled at the results! She was near tears as she described the memories that the pizza brought back to her. You guys are amazing. Thanks for helping me make her day.
  • #350 by steel_baker on 27 Oct 2015
  • Thanks for all your work on these pizzas guys! I came here to learn this style so I could surprise my neighbor who grew up in Old Forge. She came over with her daughter for pizza the other night and was thrilled at the results! She was near tears as she described the memories that the pizza brought back to her. You guys are amazing. Thanks for helping me make her day.

    Well that makes my day! Thanks!
  • #351 by hotsawce on 02 Nov 2015
  • Was this the 67% hydration version? Do you recall what oven temp you baked at and the setup? Stone, rack, etc?

    I tried this Victory Pig style for the first time tonight, and liked the new experience.
    Its like a focaccia, but crispier, at least how mine turned out.
    The pics may slightly hide the fact that I made it in a round aluminized steel pan (sorry, no rectangular ones in stock).  ::)

    The crust was very crispy and light, the cheese slightly caramelized on the edges, interesting onion/tomato flavor. I think it might be good with some sausage too (but what isn't?).

    Where do I pick up a Nash Blue Steel Pan?
    Although I could just keep doing it circular, with a party cut...I like this particular pan.

    thanks s_b!
  • #352 by woodmakesitgood on 02 Nov 2015
  • Was this the 67% hydration version? Do you recall what oven temp you baked at and the setup? Stone, rack, etc?

    If I had to guess, I think yes.
    I was trying to get some steel_baker mojo, and would have used his recipe and video pointers from back on page 1.
  • #353 by pk on 03 Nov 2015
  • Great thread!! Finally finished reading all the posts!!

    I have two questions about the original dough recipe.

    1. What is the purpose of the oil? (Softens the texture of the crust?)

    2. Is the sugar just used as a 'browning' agent? to give more crispness?
  • #354 by steel_baker on 03 Nov 2015
  • Great thread!! Finally finished reading all the posts!!

    I have two questions about the original dough recipe.

    1. What is the purpose of the oil? (Softens the texture of the crust?) Oil is optional, used for flavor as most pizza doughs contain olive oil

    2. Is the sugar just used as a 'browning' agent? to give more crispness? Yes, I like to add sugar for browning & to feed the yeast
  • #355 by tussin on 25 Nov 2015
  • I called PA Products today and they did confirm that they are no longer making Blue Steel pans.  What is a good alternative to them?
  • #356 by steel_baker on 25 Nov 2015
  • Haven't really looked since I have a few for myself. The Paderno blue steel baking sheets work quite well (Amazon.com) although they are not as deep as the PA Product pans. You have to use less oil in them to avoid overflow. You might try a good quality cake pan, even a non-stick version. I have a Chicago Metallic 9"x9" cake pan that I use for experimenting. I have a scaled down recipe that I use to make pizza with it & the results are great.

    Here is a round deep dish non-stick that I'm sure would work well. Shape is irrelevant to the flavor you're after.

    http://www.chicagometallicbakeware.com/bakeware-20/type-of-products/pizza-meatball-lasagna-pans/non-stick-deep-dish-pizza-pan.html

    -or-

    The same 9"x9" cake pan I use for experimenting.

    http://www.chicagometallicbakeware.com/bakeware-20/type-of-products/cake-pans/non-stick-9-square-cake-pan-289.html
  • #357 by Chet on 20 Dec 2015
  •  Hi Bill
     its been awhile sine i made your pizza dough, in your original recipe the oil was 1%, digging up my recipe from the topic shows 2& oil, is this a misprint in my recipe or was there an update i missed somewhere along the line, last time i made the recipe using 2& seemed ok. correct me on the oil %

      Chet
  • #358 by steel_baker on 20 Dec 2015
  • Hi Chet,

    Yes, my earlier recipe had oil at 2%. Since moving to the southwest & having to modify the recipe for altitude, I have eliminated the oil from the recipe. I did this primarily because it's hard enough to get nice brown crispiness at my 7,000' altitude, eliminating the oil from the recipe makes it an easier brown. I also ended up changing from all bread flour to a 50/50 blend of bread & self rising flours. The info I have tells me that VP uses all self rising flour.

    My new recipes:

    Pizza Dough 12x17 pan                          9x9 pan

    Flour              | 100%  | 409g                  164g
    Water             |   67%  |  274g                 114g
    Salt                 |  1.5% |    8g                    5g
    IDY                 |  2.0%  |      8g                  3g
    Sugar             |  2.0%  |   6-8g                2g

    Flour is a 50/50 blend of bread flour & self rising flour

    Updated 10/17/2014

    Pizza dough 12x17 pan - High Altitude

    Flour        | 100% | 430g
    Water      |  70%  | 301g
    Salt         |  2.0% | 9g
    IDY         |  2.3% | 10g
    Sugar      |  2.0% | 9g
  • #359 by louie_howe on 13 Feb 2016
  • I'd like to join the chorus of thank yous for your work and willingness to post the results.  I grew up in NEPA, and while Ceccoli's was and remains my favorite when I get back for a visit, it never really dawned on me that it would be possible to make the style at home.  I'm a pretty adventurous cook and baker, but it seemed that there must be some secret that put it beyond trying it at home.  Maybe that VP and Ceccoli's prosper with strange hours, long waits, and cash only policies...

    Anyway, my third try is in the oven.  A few little tweaks because of preferences - 6 in 1 crushed tomatoes, a mix of sharp provolone and mozz, a splash of fish sauce and black pepper in the sauce.  It is about the crust.  To my taste, neither VP nor Ceccoli's (where the pizza looks like it's topped with stewed tomatoes) have a sauce/cheese combination that is so great it's worth sticking to exactly.

    My husband is also a fan, although he grew up in Albany, NY.  He says that a Troy pizza joint made this style, but that wasn't true when we stopped there recently.  Maybe it has changed over the years, but now it's just an average medium thick square pizza.

    Anyway, thanks!
  • #360 by ILPadrino on 04 Mar 2016
  • Hi Steel_baker,
    I want to thank you for the VP recipe!  I have made it a few times now and it came out great.  I grew up across the river in Plains, Pa but moved to SE PA about 20yrs ago...I have a hard time finding good pizza down here, let alone anything that compares to to NE Pa pizza.  I had my dad "purchase" ,me a few steel trays from one of the local pizza  joints up that way, and it made a huge difference in the way the pizza turned out....I had 2 Aunt's that worked at the PIG for 40-50 yrs and never once thought of asking either one how the pizza was made....just took it for granted that this is how all pizza is made.  My Nona made it the same way.  Stupid me, should have paid a little better attention!!

    I am looking for a recipe for Old Forge style stuffed white pizza if anyone would like to share..

    Joe
Pages:
Actions