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Author Topic: Bianco's pizza book  (Read 17044 times)

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Offline DoouBall

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Re: Bianco's pizza book
« Reply #60 on: August 20, 2018, 01:32:32 PM »
Hey guys, I haven't posted in a while, but I just had the pleasure of both eating at Pizzeria Bianco and also meeting Chris Bianco himself.

The pizza was very good, although I have to admit I still prefer Neapolitan style. This was a very refined Neo-Neapolitan pizza similar to Mozza and Pizzeria Delfina. Bianco is arguably the best example of this style - light, airy, flavorful crust with very crispy cornicione and intensely flavorful toppings. We liked the Margherita and Wiseguy pizzas the best.

When I spoke to Chris, he was a very nice guy and talked for a long time, and shared a few tidbits of his method. He even gave me a free loaf of bread! He mentioned that they do use a small amount of biga or old dough in his pizzas. He said they use fresh yeast in the restaurant because they require consistency when making 500 pizzas a day and that would be "impossible" in his words using sourdough. That makes sense with the wildly hot and fluctuating temperatures in Arizona (it was 105F on the day we were there). On the other hand, they bake sourdough bread at his brother's restaurant Pane Bianco - this also makes sense because they probably bake all the loaves at the same time each day, making it easier to achieve consistency.

Chris kept referring to his book as a "starter book" - no surprise there. He said that if you start with the recipe he provides and tweak the variables of time and temperature, you can get the result you love. He said "F*$& what I like. You gotta make it how you like!" Chris also mentioned that he likes flour in the 13-14% protein range, and uses hydrations around 74% so that the dough is hard to work with and you almost have to "coax" it into shape. He mentioned that he sticks to organic flours from Central Milling, Carlyle (sp?) and Hayden Flour Mills. He also mentioned using organic Red Star Yeast (this seems to be available only to professionals, as I was unable to find it online or in stores for sale).

During a separate conversation with a waiter, I was told that the pizzas bake about 2.5-3 minutes each, and they run the oven around 750-800F.
« Last Edit: August 20, 2018, 02:12:21 PM by DoouBall »
Alex

Outdoor Oven: Blackstone. Indoor Oven: Gaggenau.

Offline tinroofrusted

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Re: Bianco's pizza book
« Reply #61 on: August 20, 2018, 07:16:28 PM »
Thanks for that info.  I do love that Bianco pizza.  Certainly among the best I've eaten.  I do have his book and try not to think about the pizza recipe too much because it upsets me when I do think about the missed opportunity to educate others and spread his knowledge. 

Regards,

Tinroof


Offline thezaman

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Re: Bianco's pizza book
« Reply #62 on: August 22, 2018, 07:44:59 AM »
lot of good information, thanks

Offline hotsawce

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Re: Bianco's pizza book
« Reply #63 on: August 22, 2018, 12:14:27 PM »
There is no way his dough is 74% hydration. try 64

Hey guys, I haven't posted in a while, but I just had the pleasure of both eating at Pizzeria Bianco and also meeting Chris Bianco himself.

The pizza was very good, although I have to admit I still prefer Neapolitan style. This was a very refined Neo-Neapolitan pizza similar to Mozza and Pizzeria Delfina. Bianco is arguably the best example of this style - light, airy, flavorful crust with very crispy cornicione and intensely flavorful toppings. We liked the Margherita and Wiseguy pizzas the best.

When I spoke to Chris, he was a very nice guy and talked for a long time, and shared a few tidbits of his method. He even gave me a free loaf of bread! He mentioned that they do use a small amount of biga or old dough in his pizzas. He said they use fresh yeast in the restaurant because they require consistency when making 500 pizzas a day and that would be "impossible" in his words using sourdough. That makes sense with the wildly hot and fluctuating temperatures in Arizona (it was 105F on the day we were there). On the other hand, they bake sourdough bread at his brother's restaurant Pane Bianco - this also makes sense because they probably bake all the loaves at the same time each day, making it easier to achieve consistency.

Chris kept referring to his book as a "starter book" - no surprise there. He said that if you start with the recipe he provides and tweak the variables of time and temperature, you can get the result you love. He said "F*$& what I like. You gotta make it how you like!" Chris also mentioned that he likes flour in the 13-14% protein range, and uses hydrations around 74% so that the dough is hard to work with and you almost have to "coax" it into shape. He mentioned that he sticks to organic flours from Central Milling, Carlyle (sp?) and Hayden Flour Mills. He also mentioned using organic Red Star Yeast (this seems to be available only to professionals, as I was unable to find it online or in stores for sale).

During a separate conversation with a waiter, I was told that the pizzas bake about 2.5-3 minutes each, and they run the oven around 750-800F.

Offline norcoscia

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Re: Bianco's pizza book
« Reply #64 on: August 22, 2018, 12:22:02 PM »
There is no way his dough is 74% hydration. try 64
^^^ - that would be a very very sticky dough....
Norm
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Focus is NY style but do others too
Preferred Flour (for NY pies) is All Trumps BB
Preferred temperature for NY is 550F, for NP 900+F
Preferred type of yeast IDY

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Offline DoouBall

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Re: Bianco's pizza book
« Reply #65 on: August 22, 2018, 03:34:25 PM »
I also was very surprised to hear Bianco say he uses 74% hydration. That seems really hard to work with - especially since he no longer makes the pizzas himself.

However, I wonder if he does use a hydration higher than commonly believed because the crust was extremely light, and had an airy cornicione with a supremely thin and crispy outer crust layer. Also, Tony Gemignani wrote (in his book, I believe) that high hydrations are often used to make crispier crusts. Finally Nancy Silverton stated that her pizza dough was inspired by Pizzeria Bianco, and that one is (at least in her book), a super high hydration dough.

Can you guys estimate the hydration based on these pictures I took at Pizzeria Bianco? Do you think the crispiness of the crust is due to the high hydration, or more a function of wood burning oven (dry heat) and longer bake time?
« Last Edit: August 22, 2018, 03:39:34 PM by DoouBall »
Alex

Outdoor Oven: Blackstone. Indoor Oven: Gaggenau.

Offline jsaras

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Bianco's pizza book
« Reply #66 on: August 22, 2018, 03:57:00 PM »
Here’s the dough being stretched:
« Last Edit: August 22, 2018, 03:59:01 PM by jsaras »
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