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Author Topic: Wild Yeast Deep Dish  (Read 1372 times)

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Offline ATLBob

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Wild Yeast Deep Dish
« on: October 25, 2019, 02:48:52 PM »
In my attempt to get more flavor in a deep dish crust I decided to try using a wild yeast cultivated at home with APF/water.  Results were very good.  Crust had extra flavor and everyone who ate it said it was phenomenal.  Has anyone else experimented with a ďsour doughĒ deep dish?

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Wild Yeast Deep Dish
« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2019, 04:15:52 PM »
Wow! 😲. That there's an extra deep, deep dish and it looks killah. Nice job with that one Bob.  :chef:

Sorry, nothing to add about the SD though.

Mind telling us your process with the AP culture?
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Online Pete-zza

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Re: Wild Yeast Deep Dish
« Reply #2 on: October 25, 2019, 05:14:26 PM »
In my attempt to get more flavor in a deep dish crust I decided to try using a wild yeast cultivated at home with APF/water.  Results were very good.  Crust had extra flavor and everyone who ate it said it was phenomenal.  Has anyone else experimented with a ďsour doughĒ deep dish?
ATLBob,

See the following posts:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=2365.msg20625#msg20625

Reply 22 at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=1585.msg14755#msg14755.

Peter

Offline ATLBob

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Re: Wild Yeast Deep Dish
« Reply #3 on: October 25, 2019, 10:08:53 PM »
Wow! 😲. That there's an extra deep, deep dish and it looks killah. Nice job with that one Bob.  :chef:

Sorry, nothing to add about the SD though.

Mind telling us your process with the AP culture?

Bob,

I added 1/2C unbleached King Arthur APF and 1/2C water (~90F) to a mason jar.  Stirred it up well and covered with a paper towel.  Every day Iíd scoop out around 1/4C and try to add about the same back in equal parts flour and water.  After a few days it was bubbling nicely and had a mild sour dough type smell.  I watched a few YouTube videos that were pretty precise with amounts but I just kept things simple and eyed everything.  Once I was ready to make the pizza I used just under a cup of the starter and subtracted 1/2C water and 1/2C flour from an old deep dish recipe.  I let it all ferment at room temp for 24hr, then put it in the fridge for another 24hr.  Photo is from the starter thatís now in the fridge.  Iím only going to do the feeding once a week now.  Will definitely do this again.
Cheers!

Offline ATLBob

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Re: Wild Yeast Deep Dish
« Reply #4 on: October 25, 2019, 10:24:14 PM »
ATLBob,

See the following posts:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=2365.msg20625#msg20625

Reply 22 at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=1585.msg14755#msg14755.

Peter

Peter,

Thatís interesting that you used the starter with butter.  The first thing that came to my mind was I want to try this dough and add some butter to it.  I was thinking Louís butter style by brushing it on just before the bake.  I think it would go really well with the slightly sour taste. Thanks for pointing me to this thread.

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Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Wild Yeast Deep Dish
« Reply #5 on: October 25, 2019, 10:54:15 PM »
Bob,

I added 1/2C unbleached King Arthur APF and 1/2C water (~90F) to a mason jar.  Stirred it up well and covered with a paper towel.  Every day Iíd scoop out around 1/4C and try to add about the same back in equal parts flour and water.  After a few days it was bubbling nicely and had a mild sour dough type smell.  I watched a few YouTube videos that were pretty precise with amounts but I just kept things simple and eyed everything.  Once I was ready to make the pizza I used just under a cup of the starter and subtracted 1/2C water and 1/2C flour from an old deep dish recipe.  I let it all ferment at room temp for 24hr, then put it in the fridge for another 24hr.  Photo is from the starter thatís now in the fridge.  Iím only going to do the feeding once a week now.  Will definitely do this again.
Cheers!
thank you Bob... Easy peazzy... Jus the way I like it !  😁
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline thunder

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Re: Wild Yeast Deep Dish
« Reply #6 on: October 26, 2019, 06:17:09 AM »
Looks nice ATLBob.

I haven't used a natural starter yet with a deep but I want to.  For now I have been testing various poolish starters anywhere from 8 to 30 hours with interesting and varied results which have produced quite dramatic changes in flavor.  I am zeroing in on it.  By the way, what pan did you use for that pizza?

Offline ATLBob

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Re: Wild Yeast Deep Dish
« Reply #7 on: October 26, 2019, 07:32:29 AM »
Looks nice ATLBob.

I haven't used a natural starter yet with a deep but I want to.  For now I have been testing various poolish starters anywhere from 8 to 30 hours with interesting and varied results which have produced quite dramatic changes in flavor.  I am zeroing in on it.  By the way, what pan did you use for that pizza?

Iíve been using an old 11Ē springform pan.  Iím finally going to get a steel based pan this weekend and try the seasoning method that was mentioned in a Burts thread.

Have you tried a straight 24hr room temp ferment with all the flour/ingredients?

Offline andytiedye

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Re: Wild Yeast Deep Dish
« Reply #8 on: October 26, 2019, 05:37:05 PM »
Deep dish sourdough is the best!

Offline thunder

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Re: Wild Yeast Deep Dish
« Reply #9 on: October 27, 2019, 03:20:12 AM »
Iíve been using an old 11Ē springform pan.  Iím finally going to get a steel based pan this weekend and try the seasoning method that was mentioned in a Burts thread.

Have you tried a straight 24hr room temp ferment with all the flour/ingredients?

Sorry I haven't tried that.  That is something I would be willing try though soon. I was reading CraigTX making Sicilians in under 8 hours and began experimenting. The results have been very good.  However, for Chicago styles I haven't tried that.  I have done only a quick 4 hour RT once in the past out of curiosity.  I normally have long 24-96 hr cold fermentations.

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Offline briansemerick

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Re: Wild Yeast Deep Dish
« Reply #10 on: February 24, 2020, 02:34:43 PM »
interested in trying this.  I have a starter that I bake with weekly that I created about two years ago.

Offline foreplease

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Re: Wild Yeast Deep Dish
« Reply #11 on: February 25, 2020, 11:20:32 AM »
In my attempt to get more flavor in a deep dish crust I decided to try using a wild yeast cultivated at home with APF/water.  Results were very good.  Crust had extra flavor and everyone who ate it said it was phenomenal.  Has anyone else experimented with a ďsour doughĒ deep dish?
Iím not a huge fan of the style but yours looks awesome. I would love to try a couple pieces. Great work!
-Tony

Offline ATLBob

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Re: Wild Yeast Deep Dish
« Reply #12 on: February 27, 2020, 07:56:26 AM »
Thanks Tony.  Itís definitely worth a try.  I neglected my starter since Iíve been focusing on Chicago thins. Iím going to get a new one going pretty soon.
Cheers,
Bob

Offline ATLBob

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Re: Wild Yeast Deep Dish
« Reply #13 on: February 27, 2020, 07:58:36 AM »
interested in trying this.  I have a starter that I bake with weekly that I created about two years ago.

Give it a go!

Offline Garvey

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Re: Wild Yeast Deep Dish
« Reply #14 on: November 24, 2020, 09:14:19 PM »
For one 12" DD
Flour (100%):  263 g
Water (43%):  112 g
100% Hydration Starter (32%): 85 g *
Salt (1%):  3 g
Olive Oil (14%):  37 g
Corn Oil (14%):  37 g
Sugar (1%):  3 g
Total (205%):  540 g **

* Sourdough starter was refreshed that day and was at the peak of ripeness, fed five hrs prior to using and had more than doubled
** Final hydration when calculating in the flour/water starter is 51%, oil is 24%

Mixed until uniform but no real kneading, per the DD norm.  Room temp ferment for 5-5.5hrs.  Obviously, with any starter, YMMV on how much time it takes to be ready.  In my experience, DD tends to expand a lot less than most thin does, for example.  With all the oil in DD dough, you're not going to get the same effects anyway like massive air bubbles if it's underproofed, etc.

Turned out pretty darn good.  I'm not a same-day-dough guy, but a natural starter lets me be one in this case: the natural starter doesn't create all the yeast byproducts that commercial yeast creates when you're doing emergency dough.  Not a ton of SD flavor or character here, which is fine.  I was just going for a standard DD, and this was great.  The natural starter gave it all the properties of a longer ferment that I was looking for.

My typical dough ball for a 12" DD will be in the 440-480g range, depending on toppings or who it's for (the girls in the house like more dough than I do, and they like veggies instead of meat, etc).  Since this dough ball was heavier than my norm, coming in at a whopping 540g, I needed to balance out the rest of the pie proportionally.  So this had a full 16oz of sliced cheese--half mozz and half provolone (unsmoked, of course), which is a little more than I'd normally use.  And it has 12oz of a pretty garlicky Italian sausage with no discernible fennel in it.  It may have a little but I wouldn't call it the typical "fennel sausage" like I prefer for Chicago thin.  I hand crushed canned plum tomatoes from TJ as I put them on the pie (note to self for next time: crush earlier and drain before using).  It was maybe 4 or 5 plums short of the whole 28oz can that was used here.  As you can see from the pictures, the chunks of tomatoes are substantial, so this really balanced out the pie nicely.  I'll go ahead and once again mention a hobby horse of mine: most home bakers use way too much tomato product, myself included, so learning to trust the idea of "less is more" is a tough one worth trying to embrace.   

This experiment was inspired by a recipe I've tried a couple times now, Sourdough Pizza Romana by Maurizio Leo.  Obviously, that recipe is nothing like DD, but it taught me how I could make delicious and digestible same-day dough by using a substantial bit of freshly ripened starter.  I am always looking for process improvements and how to cut out unnecessary steps and generally don't like super fussy recipes, so not having to do something in multiple stages with poolishes and bigas and this-and-that was the crux of this experiment in sourdough DD.

If you're like every other dough hipster out there with a jar of sourdough starter on your counter right now and you're wondering if you should attempt a DD with it, I hope this writeup inspires you to go for it!

Cheers,
Garvey

P.S. If you look closely at the first pic, the unbaked pie, you can see my trick of holding up the rim of the dough by pressing into the dough the half-moon shaped, torn provolone slices to create a cheese skeleton.  Not only does it hold up the rim nicely during assembly but it also fuses to the end crust to get that nice browned cheese thing going on.  Hope you like this hack.
« Last Edit: November 25, 2020, 09:16:50 AM by Garvey »

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