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  • #1 by TheHulk on 10 Apr 2020
  • Anyone out there successfully using anything similar to the Kettle Pizza setup? One of the main reasons I bought my Weber Kettle was to eventually use this type of setup. Curious how others are using it, any advice, and any modifications that have been made. I might be ordering a kit fairly soon.


    In case you're unfamiliar: https://www.kettlepizza.com/product/kettlepizza-oven-pro-plus/


    Also, what types of fire wood have you been using? Thanks!

  • #2 by ccgus on 10 Apr 2020
  • I used t have a Kettle Pizza, but eventually outgrew it and built a WFO, and then after that I got a Roccbox.

    The Kettle Pizza is fun, but frustrating. You can get some good pizzas out of it, but you have to be super on top of flame management. Just a little bit too much hardwood under the stone and you'll get a super burnt pizza. (I was using apple wood and charcoal). I wrote a bit on my site about it over the years, and the various hacks I came up with:

    https://maybepizza.com/archives/2012/3/kettlepizza_progress_report_2012.03.15.html
    https://maybepizza.com/archives/2012/4/kettlepizza_progress_report_2012.04.19.html
    https://maybepizza.com/archives/2012/5/marvin_and_a_super_big_baking_stone.html
    https://maybepizza.com/archives/2012/5/kettlepizza_at_900.html
    https://maybepizza.com/archives/2012/7/make_your_own_marvin.html

    Personally, I think you'd have better luck with a dedicated pizza oven like a Roccbox. $300 is a lot for the Kettle Pizza, and it's not super great.
  • #3 by JTreehorn on 10 Apr 2020
  • I had a Pizza Kettle (Serious Eats Edition - included massive baking steel for the top) and bought the Weber to expressly use for the pizza oven.  I experienced the same frustrations as CCGUS.  You really need to manage the fire all the time.  As I had more folks over to enjoy pizza I found that I couldn't enjoy the evening as I had to keep tending to the fire in the Kettle.  If I remember from the reviews at the time the baking steel on top was very important to get that tighter rolling flame on top of the pizza.  It did work well but was also super heavy and painful to move around on those small Weber legs. 

    I bought a Roccbox as soon as I saw Kenji and others giving rave reviews and haven't looked back.  I can now make more consistent pizzas and actually sit down and enjoy one with guests and not worry about the oven.  It looks like now that the Ooni Koda 16 is out Roccbox lowered their price to $499 and I hear good things about the original Ooni Koda which is I think $299.

    I would absolutely not spend $299 or frankly even $199 on a Kettle setup considering the options out there now.  Good luck making a choice that works for you.
  • #4 by dsc123 on 16 Apr 2020
  • You'll find a lot of negative reviews. I think I had more success than most with the help of a couple mods:

    1.  I built the fire on the same level as the pizza, not underneath, so the stone didnt overheat.

    2.  I bought a second grate and placed it on top of the sleeve, covered with aluminum foil.  Sometimes I put an extra pizza stone on it, too.  This created a low ceiling which helped the top to cook.  Sometimes the foil would start to come apart and fall down, though.

    It was fun, and the results were good.  But it was also a PITA.  Fire management was hard.  There wasnt a lot of room for the fire. It was hard to reach.  And it was super hot, so trying to reach tongs in to feed/tend the fire wasnt fun.  I always felt frantic using it, and I'd sit down to eat covered in sweat. 

    I've since bought an ooni karu and absolutely love it.  It's so easy in comparison. 
  • #5 by Jackitup on 17 Apr 2020
  • Anyone out there successfully using anything similar to the Kettle Pizza setup? One of the main reasons I bought my Weber Kettle was to eventually use this type of setup. Curious how others are using it, any advice, and any modifications that have been made. I might be ordering a kit fairly soon.


    In case you're unfamiliar: https://www.kettlepizza.com/product/kettlepizza-oven-pro-plus/


    Also, what types of fire wood have you been using? Thanks!

    You would be happier with a good stone in your home oven than you would the KettlePizza! Had one, sold it, glad to have found a buyer!! Toooo much bottom heat, PITA!
  • #6 by umirza on 22 Jul 2021
  • I used t have a Kettle Pizza, but eventually outgrew it and built a WFO, and then after that I got a Roccbox.

    The Kettle Pizza is fun, but frustrating. You can get some good pizzas out of it, but you have to be super on top of flame management. Just a little bit too much hardwood under the stone and you'll get a super burnt pizza. (I was using apple wood and charcoal). I wrote a bit on my site about it over the years, and the various hacks I came up with:

    Personally, I think you'd have better luck with a dedicated pizza oven like a Roccbox. $300 is a lot for the Kettle Pizza, and it's not super great.

    Man...i can echo these frustrations I've been having the worst time every trying to get a similar product going and working well, Im ready to throw my Kettle out the backyard the last few weeks. Really want to get it working consistently but not sure its worth the time/effort as i only make pizza once a week.
  • #7 by bbqnpizza on 03 Aug 2021
  • Hi Hulk, I too used the Kettle Pizza, started bought not long after they first came out.  I already had a pizza stone and a peel, so I bought the kit with the Ring, the stainless tray, think that was about it.  I had upgraded my kettle grate to one with a folding grate to add briquettes.  I had been cooking pizza in the kettle using a kiln cordierite shelf 5/8" thick, think I paid $18. Some of the mods before the Kettlepizza ring, was to line the bowl with heavy alum foil, and line the kettle lid the same.

    First problem with the kettle ring, as everyone one mentioned was fire management, I really was surprised how hot it got and burned the first few pies. I was using a combination of briquettes and almond.   Next, I knew I need to change my dough recipe to the margarita style to hopefully eliminate some of the char.  The pizza tops were not getting done fast enough. I hated popping for more money, however, I next bought the stainless steel that goes over the cooking surface and reflects the heat down to cook the top of the pizza. The steel comes with w slots, I blocked off one and left the other open.  For me the best setup, was the one folding grate in back "up position" (this prevented me from launching a pizza over the edge of stone into the fire, orther folding grate in front where opening to load pizza was "down position".  I used a  2 1/2" high stainless steel ring (was old wok ring) to put the stone on, the steel top I sealed one opening positioned it over the back folding grate. I used a thick wad of heavy alum foil to seal (this will get really black, the other steel top opening was still open. Essentially heat that would exhaust out the front of the kettle, some would go up into the steel top opening and keep that air space super heated.   I think I used 2 fire bricks to elevate the briquette grate.  I started with a heaping can of briquettes gray and ready, quickly added the grate the stone, 3 or 4 small chunks of wood through the top folding grate, add the top steel and lid, burn down the initial wood about 50% then pop in bigger chunks and ready to cook.  (Heavy welder gloves, made a couple of pronged tools for moving grates and stuff)

    The Steel top was the first game-changer, and results were more consistent.  However fire management was still an issue, no insulation requires feeding in fuel (wood), still struggled with bottoms getting char.  I was at a pizza parlor with wood-burning oven, noticed they started their pizza on the oven floor then slid a pizza screen under finishing off the pizza.  I bought a couple of screens.  BINGO,  consistent results.  The pies were loaded onto the stone, 1 or 2 turns, and onto the screen to finish.  90s pizza went to 2min+ and happier guests. Also, I learned heat is your friend and your foe.   I was cooking more in my kitchen oven using the same stone, lower temp, took 5-6min for 14" pepperoni and 6-8 for more toppings, using 3-4 min on stone then 1-2min on screen on stone, then 90 under the broiler, 1min more on the screen on stone (last min can be skipped our family likes crisper crust.  kitchen dough is diff recipe.  So if you can get temp down to a consistent 700F I think you will be happier.    I haven't used the weber in a couple of years,  the amount of work vs convenience in the kitchen, and I figured out how to get 650+ out of my gas stove  I got lazy lol.

    I have been planning on building a refractory oven for years, but haven't got to it.  On Wed, I am picking up a used Alfa One is a gift, so looking forward to playing with wood fired again.  I know there are many compromises using such a small oven, so I hope the pizza makes the change from kitchen oven to small wood fired oven a fun adventure that tastes great.

    The kettle experience was GREAT, I learned a lot of things, especially problem solving for cooking pizza.  Don't give up, you will appreciate whatever your next setup is even more.
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