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  • #1 by technoir on 18 Jul 2021
  • Hi all

    Im new to making pizzas ive been following a youtube video and make 3 batches so far each time my dough after resting either in the fridge or at room temp has gone full of bubbles and when I try to stretch its very sticky and breaks.

    ive attached an image so you guys can see can anyone give me some tips as to what is wrong ?

    The recipe is
    320g bread flour
    10g yeast
    260ml water
    30g olive oil
    90g fine semolina
    12g salt
    10g honey

     
  • #2 by Heikjo on 18 Jul 2021
  • It is overfermented. When it reaches that stage, it will be very airy and lose all strength.

    For the length of time you have been using, you need to use less yeast. The alternative is to let it ferment a shorter period of time.

    What kind of yeast do you use and how long do you let it ferment? Also note that a dough that will be put in the fridge needs more yeast than one which ferment at room temperature, if they rest the same number of hours.
  • #3 by technoir on 18 Jul 2021
  • Thanks so much I've been using dried active yeast ? I usually mix the ingredients then let it sit on the counter wrapped for 30 mins then make into balls. Then Ive let it rest at room temp over night and also tried in fridge overnight both ways I get similar results.

    What do u suggest using half the yeast ? I must say on the last batch there was a little left over I made into a pizza straight from the 30 mins first rest and the dough was much better, does it actually need the additional proofing.
  • #4 by Heikjo on 18 Jul 2021
  • 10g ADY for overnight in fridge is too much. For overnight in RT it's way too much.

    This is a useful chart which gives you an indication of how much yeast you want to use based on your fermentation temperature and fermentation hours: https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=26831.msg511590#msg511590

    How it works: Pick a number of hours you want the dough to ferment. Let's say 12 hours and you keep it in RT, which we for this example assume average about 22C/72F. You start with the temperature on the left side and move right until you find the number closest to 12, then move up and find the corresponding suggestion for ADY amount.

    With 72F and 12H we find that it suggests 0.063% ADY. Your dough had 410g flour and 10g ADY, which in baker's percent is 2.44% (10/410*100). I don't know how long you let it ferment, but let's assume 12 hours. That would mean you used 39 times more ADY than suggested by the chart. If we calculate how much 0.063% is, we get 0.26g of ADY.

    A dough with 10g ADY and 410g flour will be ready after an hour or two in RT.

    The amount of ADY for 12 hours in the fridge will be different since the temperature is lower. You need more yeast here. The chart may not work as well for the fridge since a few degrees difference can have a big impact, so I will let someone else make suggestions here. Whatever you try, you may have to experiment some to find what works best in your environment. Maybe it would be around 0.75-1.25% ADY. When using the fridge, final dough temperature (after mixing and kneading) also makes more of a difference, which is affected by the temperature of the water you put in the dough.

    Since you use ADY, you may also want to know this (from the Pizzamaking.com Glossary):
    Quote
    ACTIVE DRY YEAST (ADY)
    A dried form of yeast that, before combining with other dough ingredients, is activated by re-hydration, or PROOFING, in warm water (or other liquid) at around 105115℉ for about 10 minutes. Some brands of active dry yeast can also be combined with a portion of the flour and other dry ingredients, in which case the temperature of the liquid used (usually water) can be as high as 120130℉ Advantages of active dry yeast include convenience of use and long storage life, especially when sealed and frozen in an airtight container. Click HERE for additional information on ADY, and other forms of yeast as well.

    If you can buy IDY, that might be an easier option. There is no difference if either is used properly, but IDY doesn't require activation like ADY. As you maybe noticed in the chart I posted, you need less IDY than ADY for the same size dough.
  • #5 by Papa T on 22 Jul 2021
  • Way too much yeast. Next time you make it, if doing an RT ferment and rise, try 1/2 teaspoon of yeast (which is about 1.5 grams), either ADY or IDY. If doing a longer ferment in the fridge, use 1/4 teaspoon of either kind of yeast (which is about 0.75 grams). You can also just use 1/4 teaspoon of yeast for the RT ferment and rise, it will just take a bit longer for it to happen.

    The rest of your recipe looks fine. The dough in the pic you uploaded is literally fermented to death. Using 10 grams of yeast is about 14 one-quarter teaspoons of yeast.

    Also note, thet with that high a hydration level for the dough, you will likely need a bread or higher protein (strong) flour. Some all purpose flours are really at the lower end of viable protein content for high hydration, so using a strong flour will give you more latitude when stretching it.

    Hi all

    Im new to making pizzas ive been following a youtube video and make 3 batches so far each time my dough after resting either in the fridge or at room temp has gone full of bubbles and when I try to stretch its very sticky and breaks.

    ive attached an image so you guys can see can anyone give me some tips as to what is wrong ?

    The recipe is
    320g bread flour
    10g yeast
    260ml water
    30g olive oil
    90g fine semolina
    12g salt
    10g honey
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