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Author Topic: Vegan Dough?  (Read 1999 times)

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Offline pbc

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Vegan Dough?
« on: July 25, 2019, 11:30:04 AM »
So had a crazy idea to invite 20 people who are managers in my department to my place for a Pizza Party oven party.  One of them is Vegan.

I'm going to be buying dough balls (no time to make them), but thinking I may need to make a vegan dough, which I think can't use yeast or a different form.  Any successful dough recipes where I don't need to worry about changing temps on the oven or things I need to watch out for?

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Vegan Dough?
« Reply #1 on: July 25, 2019, 11:56:47 AM »
All types of yeast are vegan.
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Offline Heikjo

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Re: Vegan Dough?
« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2019, 02:53:06 PM »
As long as the doughs don't contain milk, butter, eggs or anything else from animals, they're fine.
Heine
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Offline ira

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Re: Vegan Dough?
« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2019, 05:29:59 PM »
I made a whole wheat and spelt dough for a vegan friend. It was a surprise visit so I used a lot of yeast, maybe 1%, 55 or 60% water, 10% spelt, .1% salt or some other very small number, barely enough I could consider it had any. I tried to stretch it but ended up using a rolling pin as stretching was not working. Topped with sliced cherry tomatoes and onions, baked at 650 or 700 for 2 or 3 minutes in my OONI Pro. I can't tell you how it was as Mike and Priscilla finished it before I had a chance. Don't know that it was really pizza, but it seemed to be appreciated. Sorry for not keeping the recipe, but Mike is a bit past vegan so I was asked not to make it again. He doesn't usually eat wheat.


Ira

Offline ARenko

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Re: Vegan Dough?
« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2019, 06:50:55 PM »
All types of yeast are vegan.
There are vegan's that disagree.  A tiny, tiny minority.  Jain veganism forbids yeast and other fungi.  But I'm guessing the OP is safe to serve the purchased dough to his coworker.

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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Vegan Dough?
« Reply #5 on: July 25, 2019, 06:59:51 PM »
There are vegan's that disagree.  A tiny, tiny minority.  Jain veganism forbids yeast and other fungi.  But I'm guessing the OP is safe to serve the purchased dough to his coworker.

Eating yeast is unavoidable.
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Offline pbc

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Re: Vegan Dough?
« Reply #6 on: July 25, 2019, 08:01:38 PM »
Thanks.. Had thought I read somewhere that yeast was an issue.

I will take the risk. Ha.

Offline Yael

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Re: Vegan Dough?
« Reply #7 on: July 25, 2019, 09:30:22 PM »
Just to be clear, being vegan and not eating gluten are 2 different things, right??

Then, why yeast can't be eaten by vegans?  ??? (sorry I could make a search on Google but let's continue the debate here  ;D)
“Learn the rules like a pro so you can break them like an artist” - Pablo Picasso

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Vegan Dough?
« Reply #8 on: July 26, 2019, 08:40:06 AM »
Jainism is a religion. Veganism is a way of life.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline Heikjo

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Re: Vegan Dough?
« Reply #9 on: July 27, 2019, 03:15:16 AM »
Just to be clear, being vegan and not eating gluten are 2 different things, right??

Then, why yeast can't be eaten by vegans?  ??? (sorry I could make a search on Google but let's continue the debate here  ;D)
It is, and yeast can be eaten by vegans since it's a single cell organism or something like that.

If you got celiac disease, you can't eat gluten. Then there's people with IBS that react to flours and some that don't eat wheat or gluten because they think it's bad for them.
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Offline Yael

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Re: Vegan Dough?
« Reply #10 on: July 27, 2019, 03:59:16 AM »
It is, and yeast can be eaten by vegans since it's a single cell organism or something like that.

If you got celiac disease, you can't eat gluten. Then there's people with IBS that react to flours and some that don't eat wheat or gluten because they think it's bad for them.

Indeed, yeast is a mushroom, mushroom is a vegetable, I see no reason for vegan not to eat it!  ???

And about the gluten/vegan thing, pbc talking about a "vegan dough" and Ira's message saying "Mike is a bit past vegan [...]. He doesn't usually eat wheat", I was afraid some people who don't know a lot about these two subjects could have been confused! Vegan and gluten-intolerant are 2 different things, although vegans who are looking for healthier foods are often looking for gluten-free products as well. But vegans can eat gluten  :P
“Learn the rules like a pro so you can break them like an artist” - Pablo Picasso

Offline ira

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Re: Vegan Dough?
« Reply #11 on: July 27, 2019, 10:18:55 PM »
It's not that Mike is gluten intolerant, the diet he follows does not show that wheat is a healthy food.


Ira

Offline jsaras

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Re: Vegan Dough?
« Reply #12 on: October 15, 2021, 01:54:18 PM »
Why do vegans feel entitled to have everyone cater to their preference?  If I were to show up to a vegan's house party of five people (so I would constitute 5% of the guest list, just as is the case with your party), could I expect them to make me a nice tri-tip?  If not, then why?  IMO, they should bring their own grub.
Things have never been more like today than they are right now.

Offline Pizza_Not_War

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Re: Vegan Dough?
« Reply #13 on: October 15, 2021, 07:27:48 PM »
Why do vegans feel entitled to have everyone cater to their preference?  If I were to show up to a vegan's house party of five people (so I would constitute 5% of the guest list, just as is the case with your party), could I expect them to make me a nice tri-tip?  If not, then why?  IMO, they should bring their own grub.
Not all Vegans feel that way. I was Vegan for 7 years, never once asked, mentioned or expected anything to be done special for me. If food was available I could eat I did so, if not I just passed on it. You should just limit the attack on selfish people who expect others to cater to them at all times.


Offline Chef Crispy

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Re: Vegan Dough?
« Reply #14 on: September 25, 2022, 03:19:13 AM »
An ancient topic but I am amused that.
1. Not everyone is aware that a traditional dough is vegan
2. Nobody suggested buying vegan cheese, also available at the same store you bought the dough from.
3. The “entitlement of vegans” declaration.
 If you are a host it is customary to cater to your guest preferences, otherwise, why invite them?

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Online Timpanogos Slim

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Re: Vegan Dough?
« Reply #15 on: September 28, 2022, 02:15:55 PM »
There are vegan's that disagree.  A tiny, tiny minority.  Jain veganism forbids yeast and other fungi.  But I'm guessing the OP is safe to serve the purchased dough to his coworker.

As an aside, years ago I asked a coworker from India if it's true that there is a Jain sect that doesn't eat fungi and yeast, and he said that not only is that true, there is a Jain sect that won't eat any part of a plant that grows under the ground. So, no potatoes, onions, beets, peanuts, garlic, etc.

It's a religion. Not a diet.

Veganism is an invention of white europeans. There's nothing eastern about it. The term was coined by Donald Watson in 1944.

I had many H1B coworkers from India at that job and I worked there for several years. A few of them told me that they are strict vegetarians and then later had chicken for lunch. But they don't eat beef, or pork. For religious or traditional reasons. It's important to understand that Indian culture is fairly complex and varied.

If there are vegans who won't eat yeast, I would wonder if they eat mushrooms.

There are dough conditioners (such as cystine) that are often manufactured from hog hair, so they wouldn't be acceptable for vegans or members of various religions.
« Last Edit: September 28, 2022, 02:30:28 PM by Timpanogos Slim »
Pepperoni is just American chorizo.
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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Vegan Dough?
« Reply #16 on: September 30, 2022, 01:56:11 PM »
There are dough conditioners (such as cystine) that are often manufactured from hog hair, so they wouldn't be acceptable for vegans or members of various religions.

I believe human hair was traditionally the dominant precursor. I think now the majority is produced from various biotechnologies.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
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Online Timpanogos Slim

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Re: Vegan Dough?
« Reply #17 on: October 01, 2022, 12:24:41 AM »
I believe human hair was traditionally the dominant precursor. I think now the majority is produced from various biotechnologies.

I am skeptical that human hair was ever the dominant precursor but would be willing to accept scholarly research on the subject.

I am skeptical because it is a much bigger hassle to collect human hair from barber shops than it is to collect animal hair from slaughterhouses. It's a matter of economies of scale of course. How many strip-mall hairdressers does it take to get the hair output from a single slaughterhouse processing hogs? This isn't nuanced math. There are markets for both the skin and the hair and believe it or not some of the market for pork prefers skin-on, but certainly without the hair.

The current producers of cystine who are willing to speak on the matter say that their precursor is hog hair. Consider that most of the production is in china, and china consumes a couple-three more times pork than the USA does.

Some years back, a japanese publication with a known anti-chinese bias published a scandalous story about chinese soy sauce being made from human hair - with associated grainy video of someone vaguely asian doing something with barrels of some sort of fibrous material.

At the time, a friend of mine was managing the 'magnet lab' at a major state university with a lot of industry and government contracts to run spectra analysis. He and his graduate assistant scoured the asian markets in their region for every brand of soy sauce they could find and characterized all of them.

And all of them were just different assortments of hydrolyzed proteins and amino acids, with no markers that would definitively indicate what the origin might have been.
« Last Edit: October 01, 2022, 12:37:14 AM by Timpanogos Slim »
Pepperoni is just American chorizo.
- Eric

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Vegan Dough?
« Reply #18 on: October 01, 2022, 09:43:41 AM »
I'm likewise skeptical that it's hog hair, which unlike feathers in chicken processing, is not a byproduct of hog slaughter as it's burned off the animal immediately after it's killed - at least in the slaughterhouses I've visited.

Here is an interesting quote from October 2000:

"L-cysteine is an amino acid used in the manufacture of various cosmetics. L-cysteine itself is produced in a number of ways: by fermentation in Germany; by synthesis and biotransformation in Japan, using chicken feathers in France and by hydrolysis of human hair in China. The L-cysteine made from human hair is the cheapest."

https://www.europarl.europa.eu/doceo/document/P-5-2000-3343_EN.html
« Last Edit: October 01, 2022, 09:45:51 AM by TXCraig1 »
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

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