A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Recent Posts

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 20
1
Detroit Style / Re: Pizza Today Recipe for Detroit Style Pizza
« Last post by politon on Today at 11:39:41 AM »
What are you referring to? I don't use TF. Most people outside of the Detroit area make DS much too thick. I use 3.5g per square inch.

I don't understand your question. Either way, TF or grams per square inch, it's thin. The recipe calls for 3g sq/in.
2
Try cheap plastic twist tie food bags. Give them a light coat of spray oil, drop in the ball, squeeze out the air, and twist-tie.
3
Dough Clinic / Re: Dough Weight for 14 Inch NY Style Pizza
« Last post by RHawthorne on Today at 11:19:16 AM »
No I'm not.

Yea I can definitely stretch it, it just becomes too thin it's a struggle to keep it shaped well and off the peel smoothly. I thought it was because of the high oil content but even at 1% I had the same issues.

I think it's could also just be my shaping/stretching technique. Maybe i'm pulling too much from the center of the dough and not enough from the outer areas. I'm thinking of trying again today and I can share pictures of how it goes. If I do it today though I won't refrigerate it I'll just let it sit out for 6 hours or so.
Handling and shaping techniques are definitely important, and it can take some time to get it right. If that's all it is, you'll get there, I'm sure. Sound like you already have some idea of what to try next time.
4
Thanks for the hat tip, however that's probably not where I'd start.

I'd suggest 62+/- 2% hydration with Caputo Pizzeria. You'll need to experiment to find your personal sweet spot.

For the salt, 2.8% - 3.1%

Assuming you're fermenting for at least 24 hours, you really don't need to mix it a lot. Get it nice and homogeneous in the mixer, let it rest on the counter for 10 min or so, then a few kneads and you should be good to go. I like 12 hours in balls, but you can go up to 24 without the dough getting too extensible. Do the rest of the time in bulk.

I'd stick with whatever your doing for yeast% and fermentation for now. See how it works - what you like and don't like about the pizza. Post some pics, and we can help you with the next set of tweaks.

If you're currently fermenting for less than 24 hours, let us know and we can give a few more suggestions.
5
Neapolitan Style / Re: Pizza Party on Gabriola Island
« Last post by Icelandr on Today at 11:09:01 AM »
Yikes! My immediate response was you need to set your sights higher . . . . Immediately followed by Thank you very much for your comments! I have been having fun and learning a bunch, there is not a lot better than that!
6
Craig, I’m curious how you’ve come to understand controlling for leoparding over the years.

I think it's largely a result of the RT SD ferment and the big oven, but I can't say i consciously do anything to reduce the leoparding. If I CF or use the Pizza Party oven with gas, I'll get more spotting.

One thing I've noticed over the years at the forum is that people who make a lot of pizza over a ling time tend to develop a distinctive signature look to their pies. The look is the result of the interplay of many variables including some you'll probably never realize.
7
Dough Clinic / Re: Dough Weight for 14 Inch NY Style Pizza
« Last post by Samson on Today at 11:06:10 AM »
No I'm not.

Yea I can definitely stretch it, it just becomes too thin it's a struggle to keep it shaped well and off the peel smoothly. I thought it was because of the high oil content but even at 1% I had the same issues.

I think it's could also just be my shaping/stretching technique. Maybe i'm pulling too much from the center of the dough and not enough from the outer areas. I'm thinking of trying again today and I can share pictures of how it goes. If I do it today though I won't refrigerate it I'll just let it sit out for 6 hours or so.
8
Have you looked here  -->  https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=20479.0
Not using a Carbon oven, but should work.
9
Cracker Style / Re: Finally… a successful laminated pizza!
« Last post by DNA Dan on Today at 10:55:43 AM »
Why boil the beer?

There were two reasons for this in my experience.

1) To get rid of the water. - I was after a more concentrated malt flavor. In some earlier reiterations I was using just beer and no water in the recipe at all. Which led me to malt liguors.
2) Malt liquors can have alcohol content in excess of 10%, which will start to retard the yeast. Try proofing some yeast in straight malt liquor - it won't proof as good as a sucrose laced solution. If you get something higher towards 15% you're going to start killing yeast cells.

The approach I am using involves a refrigerated bulk ferment while the yeast is in log phase. So I need the yeast proofed and roaring hot when it goes into the dough mixing process. I then slow that growth through temperature over the course of 2-3 days.

Regarding the malt barley syrups, I tried everything I could get my hands on and nothing offered the flavor profile I was after. Many of these products at the retail level are "sweeteners" at best and don't really impart much flavor. Perhaps it was the hops and other products that appealed to me more in the beer and not just a barley flavor.

I am particularly fond of using Red Hook ESB directly without boiling, which calls the malt "Caramel" malts. Not sure if this is a different process or just a more concentrated form of malt, but I am not a beer maker to know the different in the process from regular watered-down beer. I just know it makes a killer pie when fermented and laminated.


EXTRA SPECIAL BITTER
Redhook’s flagship beer got its start as a winter seasonal recipe in the mid 80’s. In the early years, Extra Special Bitter earned a reputation as ‘banana beer’ and has been brewed continuously since 1987. ESB’s caramel malt sweetness and subtle spice and fruit hop flavors, quickly defined the style, becoming Seattle’s definitive craft beer and inspiring a new wave of craft beers across the country.

FLAVOR PROFILE
AROMA: Floral Spiciness, Slight Bitterness
FLAVOR: Caramel Malts, Toffee, Baked Bread
FINISH: Fruity Esters: Stone Fruit
INGREDIENTS AND SPECIFICATIONS
MALT: Pale, Crystal
HOPS: Willamette
ORIGINAL GRAVITY: 13.3º
FINISHING GRAVITY: 2.5º
ABV: 5.8%
IBU: 28
NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION
Per 12oz serving

CALORIES: 183
CARBS: 13g
PROTEIN: 2.33g
FAT: 0g
10
Dough Clinic / Re: Dough Weight for 14 Inch NY Style Pizza
« Last post by RHawthorne on Today at 10:43:56 AM »
Thanks, I can clarify a bit.

My recent process was to mix for a few minutes and let the dough bulk ferment for 60 minutes with 2 stretches during that period. I let it sit for 30 more minutes after the fold then I ball it.

After that I put the dough in the fridge at around 40 degrees for 24 hours. I take it out and let it sit for about 2 hours and warm up before stretching it out.

I don't think I'm overworking it with this method (previous methods I definitely was) and I now see a huge improvement so I'm hoping that's not still my problem, but maybe it is.
Okay, I guess I somehow misread your post. For some reason I was thinking you meant that the dough didn't want to stretch out far enough. Yeah, 400 g of dough should definitely be stretchable to 14" without becoming too thin and weak. Are you by chance using any kind of dough conditioner?
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 20
wordpress