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Author Topic: Razza’s Dan Richer Cookbook (2021)  (Read 8001 times)

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Online Jon in Albany

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Re: Razza’s Dan Richer Cookbook (2021)
« Reply #40 on: December 25, 2021, 03:12:15 PM »
I took these instructions to mean the pizza goes to 3 locations in the oven as it cooks. Hope to try the meatball recipe later this week.

Offline scott r

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Re: Razza’s Dan Richer Cookbook (2021)
« Reply #41 on: December 25, 2021, 04:46:59 PM »
I was just gifted the book and have only flipped through it so far. On page 132, there is a description of rotating the pizza in a wood fired oven. Part of it is moving the pizza to a different part of the oven floor. So in 3 partial rotations, the pizza starts at the back of the oven and eventually ends up close to the door. Never heard that advice before. I've only heard the opposite- keep it in the same spot.

Dans suggestion on how to bake is actually a pretty common technique for a busy pizzeria.  I have seen the clockwork thing at a lot of pizzerias in Naples and a few in the US as well. I know that at one time this is the method that was being taught by Enzo Coccia.  There are a number of different methods that work for wood burning ovens depending on how conductive your floor is, how high of a dome you have, how active the oven has been, and what the balance of your top to bottom heat is.     

The suggestion to keep the pizza in one place is important during slow times in a pizzeria, or if your a home cook where your not making many pizzas at a time and back to back.  If you have a floor thats really hot during slow times it can be especially helpful, and with wood burning ovens they do tend to get really hot floors in between lunch and dinner service when the orders slow down.  Razza is only open for dinner, and so busy that there are always lots of pizzas in the oven sucking heat out of the floor, so this method works great there. 

Wood burning ovens are much hotter at the back than the front.   If your busy and are going to have a lot of pizzas in the oven at the same time you want to rotate them to different positions in the oven, otherwise your pizzas in the front will bake a lot slower than the ones in the rear of the oven.  To make consistent pizzas you need to utilize both the hot part at the back, and the cooler part at the front.   Again, at home or at slower pizzerias this isn't really an issue as long as you know the perfect place to drop the pizza for whatever temp it happens to be idling at, and how that works with your particular dough formulation.

Sometimes your oven floor is not as hot as your top heat... for instance if you havent put wood in the oven for a while and then put on a log that burns quickly.  In this situation where you have too much top heat its better to move the pizza to a fresh spot on the floor and not just rotate it in place.
« Last Edit: December 25, 2021, 05:14:56 PM by scott r »

Online Jon in Albany

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Re: Razza’s Dan Richer Cookbook (2021)
« Reply #42 on: December 25, 2021, 04:59:27 PM »
Dans suggestion on how to bake is actually a pretty common technique for a busy pizzeria.  I have seen the clockwork thing at a lot of pizzerias in Naples and a few in the US as well. I know that at one time this is the method that was being taught by Enzo Coccia.  There are a number of different methods that work for wood burning ovens depending on how conductive your floor is, how high of a dome you have, and what the balance of your top to bottom heat is.     

The suggestion to keep the pizza in one place is important during slow times in a pizzeria, or if your a home cook where your not making many pizzas at a time and back to back.  If you have a floor thats really hot during slow times it can be especially helpful, and with wood burning ovens they do tend to get really hot floors in between lunch and dinner service when the orders slow down.  Razza is only open for dinner, and so busy that there are always lots of pizzas in the oven sucking heat out of the floor, so this method works great there. 

Wood burning ovens are much hotter at the back than the front.   If your busy and are going to have a lot of pizzas in the oven at the same time you want to rotate them to different positions in the oven, otherwise your pizzas in the front will bake a lot slower than the ones in the rear of the oven.  To make consistent pizzas you need to rotate from front to rear.   Again, at home or at slower pizzerias this isn't really an issue.

Sometimes your oven floor is not as hot as your top heat... for instance if you havent put wood in the oven for a while and then put on a log that burns quickly.  In this situation where you have too much top heat its better to move the pizza to a fresh spot on the floor and not just rotate it in place.
Thanks for clarifying that. The only time I have ever seen it mentioned the advice was to spin the pizza in place and keep it in the same footprint.

Since I'm the only pizza maker and oven tender at home, I cook one at at time a little of center of the oven.

Offline scott r

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Re: Razza’s Dan Richer Cookbook (2021)
« Reply #43 on: December 25, 2021, 05:04:00 PM »
That makes sense.  You have figured out the best spot in your oven and ill bet you have also dialed in your dough to that particular spot.  Running an oven in a pizzeria (thats doing it perfectly every time) requires constantly monitoring the heat of your floor, your top heat, where pizzas have been recently, and knowing your oven well so that you know exactly where to drop the pie and where to move it (or not) based on those three variables.  Some ovens require different techniques than others.   Its the hardest thing to teach an employee because there is so much to it, and for me its almost six months before someone is really good at making EVERY pizza perfectly.
« Last Edit: December 25, 2021, 05:05:38 PM by scott r »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Razza’s Dan Richer Cookbook (2021)
« Reply #44 on: December 29, 2021, 02:35:14 PM »
For those who are interested, Pizza Today released a video of an interview of Dan Richer. It is at:

https://pizzatoday.com/podcasts/the-hot-slice/77-pizzeria-of-the-year/

For those who want to skip some of the introductory material and commercials, the actual interview starts at about 6:38.

Peter

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Offline john_k

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Re: Razza’s Dan Richer Cookbook (2021)
« Reply #45 on: December 29, 2021, 03:06:09 PM »
Thanks! I got the book for Christmas, and am just starting to absorb it.

Offline ebpizza

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Re: Razza’s Dan Richer Cookbook (2021)
« Reply #46 on: January 08, 2022, 06:53:17 AM »
I also tried the “Everyday Dough”. I was happy with the results. This is only the 2nd time I have ever made a CF dough. Probably only do CF for now on for home oven. 

Offline ebpizza

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Re: Razza’s Dan Richer Cookbook (2021)
« Reply #47 on: January 08, 2022, 01:20:38 PM »
Insight into his process and meatballs


Offline HansB

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Re: Razza’s Dan Richer Cookbook (2021)
« Reply #48 on: January 08, 2022, 08:38:29 PM »
First pizza from the book.
Instagram @hans_michigan.

"The most important element of pizza is the dough. Pizza is bread after all. Bread with toppings." -Brian Spangler

"Ultimately, pizza is a variety of condiments on top of bread. If I wanted to evolve, I figured out that I had to understand bread and first make the best bread I possibly could. Only then could my pizza evolve as well." Dan Richer

Offline DoouBall

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Re: Razza’s Dan Richer Cookbook (2021)
« Reply #49 on: January 08, 2022, 11:20:12 PM »
First pizza from the book.

Looks just like the book pics. Cooked in Roccbox?
Alex

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Offline HansB

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Re: Razza’s Dan Richer Cookbook (2021)
« Reply #50 on: January 08, 2022, 11:51:58 PM »
It was baked in my home oven, on steel.
Instagram @hans_michigan.

"The most important element of pizza is the dough. Pizza is bread after all. Bread with toppings." -Brian Spangler

"Ultimately, pizza is a variety of condiments on top of bread. If I wanted to evolve, I figured out that I had to understand bread and first make the best bread I possibly could. Only then could my pizza evolve as well." Dan Richer

Offline scott r

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Re: Razza’s Dan Richer Cookbook (2021)
« Reply #51 on: January 09, 2022, 12:58:06 AM »
HA!

Offline Jersey Pie Boy

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Re: Razza’s Dan Richer Cookbook (2021)
« Reply #52 on: January 09, 2022, 05:17:32 AM »
So Hans , what did you think? How did it compare to your usual great pizza?
He specifies very high hydration..how did that work for you?

Offline HansB

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Re: Razza’s Dan Richer Cookbook (2021)
« Reply #53 on: January 09, 2022, 10:04:21 AM »
So Hans , what did you think? How did it compare to your usual great pizza?
He specifies very high hydration..how did that work for you?

Yeah, 76% is the most I've used for pizza, I'm used to handling it because I use 80% hydration for bread. I thought that the texture and flavor were really good and will make it again. It's the closest to a 900° bake, as far as texture, that I've gotten in my home oven.
Instagram @hans_michigan.

"The most important element of pizza is the dough. Pizza is bread after all. Bread with toppings." -Brian Spangler

"Ultimately, pizza is a variety of condiments on top of bread. If I wanted to evolve, I figured out that I had to understand bread and first make the best bread I possibly could. Only then could my pizza evolve as well." Dan Richer

Offline Jersey Pie Boy

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Re: Razza’s Dan Richer Cookbook (2021)
« Reply #54 on: January 09, 2022, 01:59:00 PM »
Thanks...very interesting. Do you happen to have any crumb shots?

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Offline HansB

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Re: Razza’s Dan Richer Cookbook (2021)
« Reply #55 on: January 09, 2022, 02:23:00 PM »
Thanks...very interesting. Do you happen to have any crumb shots?

No, I only took the one photo. It's about as you would imagine.
Instagram @hans_michigan.

"The most important element of pizza is the dough. Pizza is bread after all. Bread with toppings." -Brian Spangler

"Ultimately, pizza is a variety of condiments on top of bread. If I wanted to evolve, I figured out that I had to understand bread and first make the best bread I possibly could. Only then could my pizza evolve as well." Dan Richer

Offline Jersey Pie Boy

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Re: Razza’s Dan Richer Cookbook (2021)
« Reply #56 on: January 09, 2022, 11:38:20 PM »
Then its great 👍

Offline SHB

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Re: Razza’s Dan Richer Cookbook (2021)
« Reply #57 on: January 19, 2022, 04:42:26 PM »
Gone through the book. I think the most powerful part of this book is how heavily it relies on using your senses when making pizza and how to adjust your process when something is amiss. If you're looking for "The BEST pizza dough recipe EVER" you wont find it here. If you're looking for unchanging minute instructions on how to make perfect pizza on your first try, you wont find it here. Those here who argue over .25% of salt or a percentage or two of hydration probably wont connect with this book. What you will find in this book are methods and processes, visual and tactile ques and the reasons behind them to make great pizza at home. He is upfront with the fact that your oven is not his oven, your flour is not his flour thus an authoritative 1,2,3 step instruction will just lead to poor pizza while an iterative strategy will help you hone in on how to make good pizza in YOUR home.

Worthy as a pickup solely as a coffee table book (its beautiful) but worth reading and digesting the authors processes rather than its "recipes."
« Last Edit: January 19, 2022, 04:44:43 PM by SHB »

Offline Rainier42

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Re: Razza’s Dan Richer Cookbook (2021)
« Reply #58 on: January 20, 2022, 02:45:48 PM »
Just received this book as a Bday gift from my wife.  Am going to try his basic dough recipe this coming week.  Has anyone substituted bread flour for the AP flour he suggests using?
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Offline SonVolt

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Re: Razza’s Dan Richer Cookbook (2021)
« Reply #59 on: January 20, 2022, 03:58:05 PM »
Just received this book as a Bday gift from my wife.  Am going to try his basic dough recipe this coming week.  Has anyone substituted bread flour for the AP flour he suggests using?


No, that kinda defeats the purpose of his philosophy expressed in the book (imo). He rails against higher protein flours. 

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