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Author Topic: Offered to run a popup for local biz - how to manage potential leftover dough?  (Read 571 times)

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Offline levity03

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Hey everyone,

I've operated a popup here and there from my apartment in Brooklyn but obviously have much more control utilizing pre-orders vis a vis how much dough to make. Recently, I've been offered to run a popup at a local outdoor sports biz - it's a new place so not tons and tons of traffic but I'm trying to figure out if it's doable and how to manage the amount of dough to make. They may be able to give me rough figures based on previous weekend traffic but you never know how it'll turn out, esp if weather doesn't cooperate. For ex., if I make 50 balls and sell 25, what do I do with the remaining dough balls? Is it feasible to freeze this many balls once they've been proofed?

Any insight into the above and any other general tips is greatly appreciated!

Thank you!
Max

Offline Jon in Albany

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For starters, I know nothing about the legalities of a pop up...but this is the internet, so my two cents anyway...

If you are doing pop ups or starting a brand, I would be cautious about changing the dough workflow without some testing. I'm guessing if you have the 50 doughs to sell, and only sell 25, the remaining 25 would have been ready (or close to ready) to sell. I'm not sure how closely that would freeze, thaw, cook and compare to what you are normally making. Have you ever frozen your dough before?  Do you have freezer space for 25 doughs?

Some more information is needed. What flour are you using, how big is a dough ball, what are you storing the dough in....I just a home pizza maker, but the dough is the least expensive part of my pizza ingredients. Everything that goes on the dough is where the costs start to increase. The cost of flour has gone up, but a 50 pound bag of non imported flour still isn't that expensive. So depending on the dough cost, how much would it cost to be out 25 doughs?

Not sure if you think in ounces or grams. But say you've got a 12 ounce dough ball (340 g). Ballparking 60% is water and ignoring other ingredients that's 7.5 oz (212 g) flour and 4.5 oz (128g) water. 25 times that flour weight is  187.5 oz (5300 g). So about 12 pounds of flour. A 50 pound bag of King Arthur Special Patent (bread flour) at Restaurant Depot was recently $24. So, a little under $6 of flour. Less if you were using something like All Trumps or Ardent Mills Hummer - two of a few flours available at the Albany Restaurant Depot.  Sure there are other expenses - getting the flour, prep, storage....The bigger costs would be leftover cheese, sauce and toppings which could be kept for a little bit and used by doing another apartment popup soon after sports biz pop up.

Anyhow, I'd say go for it. If you have leftover dough, give some pizza to the other people working there and do some experiments by freezing leftover dough. In my opinion, the pop up experience is going to be worth much more than the cost of any extra dough you might have.





Offline TXCraig1

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Throw them away.

Pizza dough is cheap.

Running out of pizza can be expensive.

Making crappy pizza because you're trying to save a few bucks using old dough that should have been tossed can be really expensive.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
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Offline woodfiredandrew

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Make Garlic knots with leftover dough or flat bread topped with herbs, garlic and oo, they will last in refrigerator for few days. I would start small, maintain quality and turn people away(if run out)  for first few than sell them sub quality product.   
People are unreasonable, illogical and self-centered, love them anyway. If you do good, people will accuse you of selfish ulterior motives, do good anyway. Honesty and frankness make you vulnerable, Be honest and frank anyway. If you are successful , you will win false friends and true enemies, succeed anyway.

Offline wotavidone

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 ^^^

Yeah mate, toss 'em, I reckon.
I make 6 doughballs for about $A1.20 if using Aldi generic flour, that at a pinch I can use for 90 seconds Margheritas.
Type 00 - $A2.50.
Depending on flour choice, between $5 and $10 Australian to make 2 dozen doughballs.
Plus time, but if you are worried about a reasonable hourly rate for your work, don't go into the restaurant business! :(

Or, has already been suggested - sling a few pizzas to give to you fellow workers to build priceless goodwill, or make it all into flat breads that people may just buy at the end of the day to take home.

It'll only happen a couple times, then you'll have a decent idea pf how many you can sell and your wastage should decline as you match supply to demand.

Another possibility occurs to me - not sure of the food rules in your part of the world, but over here if you ask the bakeries for left over dough they'll happily sell it to you to take home and cook yourself. Maybe you could bag doughballs at the end of the day and sell them.
« Last Edit: July 06, 2022, 05:44:55 PM by wotavidone »
Mick

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Offline waltertore

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If it is a kid friendly event give them to them. They will love to play with it. 
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Offline levity03

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My concern wasn't necessarily $, it was more about waste. I like the idea of turning them into garlic knots :)

Thanks all.


Offline Alleypizza

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I sell pizza every week from my alley. I always make extra dough incase Iím not happy with a dough ball or I burn a pizza. At the end of the night I always have some leftover. Iíve baked bread in tins, Iíve re-balled the dough and baked larger loaves and Iíve made focaccia. Everyone excepts free fresh baked bread.

Offline Andrew Bellucci

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Throw them away.

Pizza dough is cheap.

Running out of pizza can be expensive.

Making crappy pizza because you're trying to save a few bucks using old dough that should have been tossed can be really expensive.

The amount of dough I throw away might be staggering to some, but for me, it's part of the cost of doing business.

If the dough ball isn't perfect, for whatever reason, it gets tossed without hesitation.
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Offline theppgcowboy

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The amount of dough I throw away might be staggering to some, but for me, it's part of the cost of doing business.

If the dough ball isn't perfect, for whatever reason, it gets tossed without hesitation.

Like what is not perfect?

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Offline Andrew t

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Throw them away.

Pizza dough is cheap.

Running out of pizza can be expensive.

Making crappy pizza because you're trying to save a few bucks using old dough that should have been tossed can be really expensive.

this is so true.

If you're determined to use it, you might try panning to proof overnight and make Sicilian style par-bakes or make pinsa style par bakes. They both freeze well. You can then use them as special offering.

The formula and workflow I have works well for both options. If or when my pop-up business becomes more regular that will be what I'll do. Reframe the bug as a feature.

Look at how many places change work flow to serve multiple styles with one formula (Tony G's, Metro, Good Pie, Audrey Jane's, etc...).

For now I'm in the give them away or toss them camp.

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