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Offline HappyAmateur

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Dough tests and affecting factors
« on: July 10, 2023, 03:26:11 AM »
Happy monday!

I figured today would be a good day for my first question!  :)

I have been making pizza doughs (neapolitan-style) for almost a year. Still being an low level amateur, I have become interested in approaching my pizza hobby more ”scientifically” (e.g. through more measurements and making small isolated adjustments to see the effect it has).

The things I have been measuring include temperature in the air, the ingredients and the dough. I have also measured volume growth (is that equivalent to measuring the fermentation?) using a rain meter.

I would like to expand my test portfolio for future doughs. Mostly I would like to learn more about maturation in the dough. Is that possible to measure? Even subjective tests would be interesting such as how ”gummy” the dough feels etc.

Any suggestions of tests and/or factors to monitor are welcome!

Offline Anton1

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Re: Dough tests and affecting factors
« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2023, 08:40:24 AM »
[quote author=HappyAmateur link=topic=80707.msg756285#msg756285 date=1688973971

Any suggestions of tests and/or factors to monitor are welcome!


This link may be of interest; https://www.academia.edu/

Anton1
My Title? Call me anything except, "The Late".

Offline HappyAmateur

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Re: Dough tests and affecting factors
« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2023, 01:17:24 PM »
Thank you, Anton1! I will try to find interesting articles with interesting methodologies that can be applied in a home setting :-)

Offline foreplease

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Re: Dough tests and affecting factors
« Reply #3 on: July 12, 2023, 03:41:18 AM »
This is a short thread with many well organized links to other topics on the matter here on pizzamaking.com
https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=73290.0


With the measurements and temperatures you have begun to record and use, adding these two things to your notes about each dough you make will give you some good insight as to how your dough begins that part of its life during which it ferments.
-Temperature of the water you use in your dough
- FDT, or final dough temperature
One directly impacts the other, consistently so. If you can achieve, generally, the same FDT from one dough to the next you will be able to more easily see (with conviction) the effect of your fermentation temperature and time, if your batch sizes are similar. Learn to change water temp to achieve your DDT (desired dough temperature, or target temperature as some call it). That will give you a reliable FDT (within 2-3 degrees over or under your target).


If I had to guess, I would say your experiments will have you trying water temps of 45-55 degrees, depending on how you plan to ferment your dough. I hope this helps. Welcome to the forum.good luck and enjoy rhe process.
-Tony

Offline HappyAmateur

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Re: Dough tests and affecting factors
« Reply #4 on: July 12, 2023, 04:57:55 PM »
This is a short thread with many well organized links to other topics on the matter here on pizzamaking.com
https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=73290.0


With the measurements and temperatures you have begun to record and use, adding these two things to your notes about each dough you make will give you some good insight as to how your dough begins that part of its life during which it ferments.
-Temperature of the water you use in your dough
- FDT, or final dough temperature
One directly impacts the other, consistently so. If you can achieve, generally, the same FDT from one dough to the next you will be able to more easily see (with conviction) the effect of your fermentation temperature and time, if your batch sizes are similar. Learn to change water temp to achieve your DDT (desired dough temperature, or target temperature as some call it). That will give you a reliable FDT (within 2-3 degrees over or under your target).


If I had to guess, I would say your experiments will have you trying water temps of 45-55 degrees, depending on how you plan to ferment your dough. I hope this helps. Welcome to the forum.good luck and enjoy rhe process.

Thank you, foreplease!

That was indeed a very good umberella-thread to start with and it seems that the FDT and water temperature are very central measurements!

Best wishes from Sweden

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Offline Anton1

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Re: Dough tests and affecting factors
« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2023, 10:46:36 AM »

  ...Mostly I would like to learn more about maturation in the dough. Is that possible to measure? Even subjective tests would be interesting such as how ”gummy” the dough feels etc.

Any suggestions of tests and/or factors to monitor are welcome!

Happy,

Here according to ChatGPT:

"In the realm of bread-making, "fermentation" and "maturation" refer to distinct stages in the process of dough development, each contributing to the final characteristics of the bread:

Fermentation:
•   Fermentation is the initial stage in which the yeast in the dough metabolizes sugars (present in the flour or added as sweeteners) and produces carbon dioxide gas and alcohol. This process is primarily driven by the yeast's activity.
•   
•   As yeast consumes sugars, it releases carbon dioxide, which gets trapped in the dough, causing it to rise. This trapped gas creates air pockets, giving the bread its characteristic light and airy texture.
•   
•   During fermentation, the dough undergoes bulk fermentation or proofing, typically at warmer temperatures, allowing the yeast to actively multiply and ferment the sugars.
•   
Maturation (also known as Proofing or Aging):

•   Maturation occurs after the initial fermentation stage and involves allowing the dough to rest for a longer period. This phase allows for additional development of flavor and texture in the dough.
•   
•   Maturation often occurs at a cooler temperature and can range from a few hours to overnight or longer, depending on the recipe and desired characteristics.
•   
•   During maturation, the dough undergoes further enzymatic activity and chemical reactions, leading to the breakdown of complex compounds and the development of more nuanced flavors and a better overall structure in the bread.
•   
In summary, fermentation primarily involves the yeast's action on sugars, resulting in gas production and dough rising, while maturation focuses on longer resting periods that allow for the enhancement of flavor, texture, and overall quality of the dough through various biochemical processes. Both stages are crucial in bread-making, contributing distinct elements to the final product.

Visual Clues:
In bread-making, observing visual cues is essential to determine when fermentation (the rising of dough due to yeast activity) and maturation (the resting period for flavor and structure development) are complete. Here are some visual clues for each stage:

Fermentation:
increased Volume: During fermentation, the dough should visibly increase in volume. It should roughly double or slightly more in size from its original volume.

Visible Air Pockets: As fermentation progresses, air pockets or bubbles should be visible within the dough, indicating the production of carbon dioxide by the yeast.

Smooth and Puffy Surface: The surface of the dough becomes smoother and slightly puffy as it rises. It may appear slightly domed or rounded.

Maturation:
Slightly Increased Volume: After the initial fermentation, the dough might not significantly increase in volume during maturation. Instead, it might maintain its risen state or slightly relax and settle.

Developed Flavor: Maturation contributes to the development of flavors. While it might not be visible, a well-matured dough often exhibits a more pronounced aroma, indicating enhanced flavor.

Firmness and Structure: The dough's structure becomes more stable and firmer during maturation. Gluten relaxes and develops, allowing the dough to hold its shape better.

Visual cues are useful indicators, but they should be considered alongside other factors, such as the recipe, timing, temperature, and touch or feel of the dough. Often, experienced bakers rely on a combination of visual cues and tactile sensations (such as the dough's elasticity and resistance to touch) to determine when fermentation and maturation are complete, ensuring the best possible bread outcome."

Anton1
My Title? Call me anything except, "The Late".

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