A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Author Topic: Pizzeria DiLauro  (Read 28697 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Andrew Bellucci

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 553
  • Age: 57
  • Location: Astoria - Crown Heights
    • Bellucci Pizza
Re: Pizzeria DiLauro
« Reply #200 on: January 20, 2021, 11:41:52 PM »
I look at your photos and it looks like a place I'd like to hang out in regardless of what food they had.  Now add awesome pizza and the sky's the limit!  Hope to check it out one day!

Offline Little bean

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 764
  • Age: 36
  • Location: Burton ohio
  • Pizzeria DiLauro
    • Pizzeria DiLauro
Re: Pizzeria DiLauro
« Reply #201 on: January 21, 2021, 07:58:21 AM »
Iím really glad you said that, because thatís exactly what I wanted to do, you are there all hours of operation and a couple before and some time after, I put a lot of time into designing not only my dream hang out spot, but my dream dream restaurant. I wanted a place I personally didnít want to leave, and hope that there were others that would feel the same way about it as well.

Offline waltertore

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4120
  • Location: Reno, Nevada
  • # 1 RATED PIZZERIA IN USA ON YELP
    • Smiling With Hope Pizza
Re: Pizzeria DiLauro
« Reply #202 on: January 21, 2021, 04:50:47 PM »
Iím really glad you said that, because thatís exactly what I wanted to do, you are there all hours of operation and a couple before and some time after, I put a lot of time into designing not only my dream hang out spot, but my dream dream restaurant. I wanted a place I personally didnít want to leave, and hope that there were others that would feel the same way about it as well.

Your shop sure looks like a dream setup.  I agree about making it a place you want to hang out in. Owning the space you get to create every inch and to me that is a priceless gift.  It might be hard to turn all that new stuff over to others to use :-D  Our shop is funkier/simpler but I set up the same vibe as I am there all hours of operation both service and prep/dough(I am the sole guy).  I love being there alone before we open prepping/making dough/miscellaneous.  I listen to the detective/Sci Fi shows from the 30's-50's on the old time radio station.  I don't answer the phone, take some breaks along the way.  Here is a shot with Paulie Gee, his wife, and my wife Judy.  The sit down music shots are of my little desk/personal expresso machine.  It is butts up to the mop sink.  Our shop is just like the ones I grew up in in NJ.  A bit funky/tight space/ but clean and equipment works right.  The space was various pizzerias over the past 40 years so it has some old school patina to it  :-D We didn't have the $ to go all new- did it all on 25k.
« Last Edit: January 21, 2021, 04:56:17 PM by waltertore »
SMILING WITH HOPE PIZZA MISSION STATEMENT
TO CREATE HOPE AND MEANING IN THE LIVES OF PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES
http://www.smilingwithhopepizza.com/

Offline Little bean

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 764
  • Age: 36
  • Location: Burton ohio
  • Pizzeria DiLauro
    • Pizzeria DiLauro
Re: Pizzeria DiLauro
« Reply #203 on: January 21, 2021, 06:12:49 PM »
Your shop sure looks like a dream setup.  I agree about making it a place you want to hang out in. Owning the space you get to create every inch and to me that is a priceless gift.  It might be hard to turn all that new stuff over to others to use :-D  Our shop is funkier/simpler but I set up the same vibe as I am there all hours of operation both service and prep/dough(I am the sole guy).  I love being there alone before we open prepping/making dough/miscellaneous.  I listen to the detective/Sci Fi shows from the 30's-50's on the old time radio station.  I don't answer the phone, take some breaks along the way.  Here is a shot with Paulie Gee, his wife, and my wife Judy.  The sit down music shots are of my little desk/personal expresso machine.  It is butts up to the mop sink.  Our shop is just like the ones I grew up in in NJ.  A bit funky/tight space/ but clean and equipment works right.  The space was various pizzerias over the past 40 years so it has some old school patina to it  :-D We didn't have the $ to go all new- did it all on 25k.

I like the desk by the mop sink, the only desk I would ever have. I donít even know what people do at desks.....

Offline waltertore

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4120
  • Location: Reno, Nevada
  • # 1 RATED PIZZERIA IN USA ON YELP
    • Smiling With Hope Pizza
Re: Pizzeria DiLauro
« Reply #204 on: January 21, 2021, 07:34:59 PM »
I like the desk by the mop sink, the only desk I would ever have. I donít even know what people do at desks.....

How long till you open?
SMILING WITH HOPE PIZZA MISSION STATEMENT
TO CREATE HOPE AND MEANING IN THE LIVES OF PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES
http://www.smilingwithhopepizza.com/

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Offline Little bean

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 764
  • Age: 36
  • Location: Burton ohio
  • Pizzeria DiLauro
    • Pizzeria DiLauro
Re: Pizzeria DiLauro
« Reply #205 on: January 21, 2021, 07:51:58 PM »
How long till you open?

I donít know, we are having some material delays due I believe to Covid. Iím hoping in a couple weeks. We are making pizzas and going through training and will be ready to go.

Offline waltertore

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4120
  • Location: Reno, Nevada
  • # 1 RATED PIZZERIA IN USA ON YELP
    • Smiling With Hope Pizza
Re: Pizzeria DiLauro
« Reply #206 on: January 21, 2021, 08:18:16 PM »
I donít know, we are having some material delays due I believe to Covid. Iím hoping in a couple weeks. We are making pizzas and going through training and will be ready to go.

Man you are organized!  I know a lot of construction out here in Reno is delayed by Covid.   The good news is you are going to get there  ^^^
SMILING WITH HOPE PIZZA MISSION STATEMENT
TO CREATE HOPE AND MEANING IN THE LIVES OF PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES
http://www.smilingwithhopepizza.com/

Offline hammettjr

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3719
  • Location: Long Island, NY
  • Matt
Re: Pizzeria DiLauro
« Reply #207 on: January 21, 2021, 10:33:34 PM »
I'm way late to this party, just finished reading through the thread. This is super exciting...place looks great and the pies!!! That plain slice look perfect. Looking forward to watching your journey continue.

Matt

Offline Little bean

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 764
  • Age: 36
  • Location: Burton ohio
  • Pizzeria DiLauro
    • Pizzeria DiLauro
Re: Pizzeria DiLauro
« Reply #208 on: January 21, 2021, 10:57:11 PM »
I'm way late to this party, just finished reading through the thread. This is super exciting...place looks great and the pies!!! That plain slice look perfect. Looking forward to watching your journey continue.

Thanks a lot Matt, there is a lot to be learned in your thread, I can attest to that.

Offline nickyr

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1153
  • Location: Mountain View, CA, USA
Re: Pizzeria DiLauro
« Reply #209 on: January 21, 2021, 11:21:13 PM »
Brooklyn Sicilian from the testing stage
That looks so good

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Offline KCSPIZZAPIES

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 28
  • Age: 24
  • Location: Phoenix, AZ
  • Lifetime learner
Re: Pizzeria DiLauro
« Reply #210 on: January 22, 2021, 12:10:38 AM »
We are Definately going for a more artisan pizza. I still have 4 more bags of flour to test through but Iím very happy with the results so far.
What flours have you been testing/ liking most? Any different from what you were using on the trailer?
KC

Offline Little bean

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 764
  • Age: 36
  • Location: Burton ohio
  • Pizzeria DiLauro
    • Pizzeria DiLauro
Re: Pizzeria DiLauro
« Reply #211 on: January 22, 2021, 07:38:50 AM »
What flours have you been testing/ liking most? Any different from what you were using on the trailer?

Yes, on the trailer we use gm Neapolitan, the most consistent I have found for my workflow and uses. So far for the shop I have made bags of KA special patent, KA sir galahad, and Gm full strength. I have a bag of KA sir Lancelot rolled yesterday and in the fridge to make some pizzas tonight. Excited it will
Be the first day we get to use the new pizza table. Currently we are only making a couple pizzas a time, nothing like it will be when we open the shop so we are being conscious of the subtle differences we are anticipating we will encounter when we start doing volume, but our basic workflow right now is very similar to our trailer workflow. Everyone who has had the opportunity to try my pizza out of the pizzamaster tells me it is unbelievably the same as the trailer pizza. This really surprises everyone because you can tell they think the oven you pull a pizza out of, with a different heat source should be a completely different product, but we are trying to make our woodfired pizza the same, just a little crispier and in better condition for takeout. Speaking with a lot of people that have taken then same path I have this is where a lot of people end up. I would not change the fact that we started as a wood fired setup because as far as being mobile, for speed and efficiency I believe it is the best and most easily executed method. Itís easy to sell people on the 10-12 inch pizza without having to mess with slices, and the dough management for 10 ounce dough-balls is far more realistic. We are using the same ingredients and workflows to create a slightly different style pizza geared toward takeout. We have had multiple people from different areas of New York City stop into our shop while we were testing and have given them complimentary pies. Yesterday a gentleman came back from Brooklyn, and we chatted for about five minutes. He begged me not to change a thing, the pizza we gave him would already be among one of the best slices in nyc. I do not believe him, or will let that make me believe we have achieved our goals, but does make me happy that we are on the right track. He will be good for 5-6 pizzas every Friday night. Our current formula in our testing stages is 60% water, 2% oil, 2.5% salt, .1% idy. We have an RO line specifically for making dough piped in right next to my mixer. We didnít have room in my shop for it so we ran the lines through the ceiling and put the setup in my wifeís shop next door. We mix on low speed on the abs for two minutes, then kick up to high speed for 4 minutes. The dough in this environment has been coming off between  73 and 75 degrees. We bulk for around 5 hours, keeping an eye on it to not quite double at around 75 degrees ambient. After we fire equipment the ambient will go up, but we have a separate furnace and duct in the kitchen to run ac to keep it cool if needed. After the bulk we ball and go straight into the fridge. Tossed up between 22-24 ounce for 18 inch pizzas at the moment. The dough has been good after 24 hours in balls, and great after 48-72 hours. If anyone has any other questions about our progress, methods, what we have gone through to get the trailer started or build this shop out or anything in general please reach out to me. Many people on this site are the reason I am able to do why Iím doing right now and Iíll never forget that. Just 4 years ago we had absolutely nothing but a thought in our head we wanted to make pizza. Itís been a cool ride. Pay no attention to the fact that the cheese does not go all the way to the rim on this slice, I already know that.
« Last Edit: January 22, 2021, 07:56:16 AM by Little bean »

Offline scott r

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4949
  • Age: 50
  • Location: Boston
  • I Love Pizzafreaks!
Re: Pizzeria DiLauro
« Reply #212 on: January 22, 2021, 09:33:23 AM »
The pizzas and the restaurant look awesome!!!    Very cool about the RO.   I remember Chris Bianco telling me he used one, but I assumed just because the water is so screwy just about everyone in AZ has one.  Will you be using straight RO water for the dough?

Offline Little bean

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 764
  • Age: 36
  • Location: Burton ohio
  • Pizzeria DiLauro
    • Pizzeria DiLauro
Re: Pizzeria DiLauro
« Reply #213 on: January 22, 2021, 10:16:09 AM »
The pizzas and the restaurant look awesome!!!    Very cool about the RO.   I remember Chris Bianco telling me he used one, but I assumed just because the water is so screwy just about everyone in AZ has one.  Will you be using straight RO water for the dough?

Yes, we donít have good water here we are in a well, so I have the ro run for the dough, and a line run to tie in the coffee and espresso machines, as well as the drinking water for the dining room. We got one of those Panera style 3 gallon juice tumblers for complimentary cold water since we donít have an ice machine.

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 30822
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Pizzeria DiLauro
« Reply #214 on: January 22, 2021, 12:39:17 PM »
Little bean,

I notice that you let the dough rest in bulk before forming into dough balls to go into your cooler. I know that there are pizza operators who do the same or similar thing with their dough but Tom Lehmann was not an advocate of using a rest period beyond the inherent time it takes to convert a bulk dough to dough balls. This matter came up on another thread a few days ago and I did a search of Tom's posts to refresh my memory. This is the post that I found and cited:

Reply 3 at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=53041.msg537571#msg537571

Also, if you are interested, you can read the dough making approach that Tom devised for professional pizza operators:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=43833.msg438770#msg438770

I don't mean to suggest that you follow Tom's approach but it might be worth considering.

Peter

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Offline Little bean

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 764
  • Age: 36
  • Location: Burton ohio
  • Pizzeria DiLauro
    • Pizzeria DiLauro
Re: Pizzeria DiLauro
« Reply #215 on: January 22, 2021, 01:14:29 PM »
Little bean,

I notice that you let the dough rest in bulk before forming into dough balls to go into your cooler. I know that there are pizza operators who do the same or similar thing with their dough but Tom Lehmann was not an advocate of using a rest period beyond the inherent time it takes to convert a bulk dough to dough balls. This matter came up on another thread a few days ago and I did a search of Tom's posts to refresh my memory. This is the post that I found and cited:

Reply 3 at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=53041.msg537571#msg537571

Also, if you are interested, you can read the dough making approach that Tom devised for professional pizza operators:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=43833.msg438770#msg438770

I don't mean to suggest that you follow Tom's approach but it might be worth considering.

Peter

Yes Peter,

I am well aware of Toms amazing advice on all things dough management. Iím not a chemist or a scientist like Tom was so I can not really explain why this method works for me but for some reason it just comes out good. When bulking for at least 5 hours I can mimic a 48 or 72 hour dough within 24 hours. Iíll attatch a photo of some 24 hour doughballs from this morning.

Offline woodfiredandrew

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 281
  • Location: Houston
  • follow your passion!
Re: Pizzeria DiLauro
« Reply #216 on: January 22, 2021, 01:46:17 PM »
"When bulking for at least 5 hours I can mimic a 48 or 72 hour dough within 24 hours" Little Bean from above

That is a very good piece of observation. I have never tried it but i am always thinking about speeding up the process without compromising on quality. I need to work on it to figure out for my optimal "F" value for BF.
Not too long ago i  found out one of the local very successful Mediterranean rest. owner uses a device to achieve 24 marination results in 20 minutes for his meat to save time and space. That provoked my thoughts about shortening fermentation. Like you i am not a chemist.   

Thanks for you are taking time to get into details. Best Luck!!


Offline Little bean

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 764
  • Age: 36
  • Location: Burton ohio
  • Pizzeria DiLauro
    • Pizzeria DiLauro
Re: Pizzeria DiLauro
« Reply #217 on: January 22, 2021, 02:42:03 PM »
Glass installers came to finish off the vestibule so made them the first Sicilian of the day.

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 30822
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Pizzeria DiLauro
« Reply #218 on: January 22, 2021, 06:31:15 PM »
Yes Peter,

I am well aware of Toms amazing advice on all things dough management. Iím not a chemist or a scientist like Tom was so I can not really explain why this method works for me but for some reason it just comes out good. When bulking for at least 5 hours I can mimic a 48 or 72 hour dough within 24 hours. Iíll attatch a photo of some 24 hour doughballs from this morning.
Little bean,

One of the major factors in making dough commercially is the temperature where the dough is made. Where I live in Texas, heat is a dominant factor in making dough, especially in the months of June, July, and August where outdoor temperatures can be around 100 degrees for many days on end. For me, that means using less yeast in the summer than in the winter because my room temperatures are also warmer or cooler in those seasons.

Where you are in Burton, Ohio, the annual temperature range is not as severe as it is in Texas, at least according to this article:

https://www.bestplaces.net/weather/city/ohio/burton#:~:text=The%20most%20pleasant%20months%20of%20the%20year%20for,as%20one%20of%20the%20coolest%20places%20in%20Ohio .

It will be interesting to see how your dough performs over the course of the year as the temperatures where you make the dough change over time.

Peter

Offline Little bean

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 764
  • Age: 36
  • Location: Burton ohio
  • Pizzeria DiLauro
    • Pizzeria DiLauro
Re: Pizzeria DiLauro
« Reply #219 on: January 22, 2021, 08:41:19 PM »
Little bean,

One of the major factors in making dough commercially is the temperature where the dough is made. Where I live in Texas, heat is a dominant factor in making dough, especially in the months of June, July, and August where outdoor temperatures can be around 100 degrees for many days on end. For me, that means using less yeast in the summer than in the winter because my room temperatures are also warmer or cooler in those seasons.

Where you are in Burton, Ohio, the annual temperature range is not as severe as it is in Texas, at least according to this article:

https://www.bestplaces.net/weather/city/ohio/burton#:~:text=The%20most%20pleasant%20months%20of%20the%20year%20for,as%20one%20of%20the%20coolest%20places%20in%20Ohio .

It will be interesting to see how your dough performs over the course of the year as the temperatures where you make the dough change over time.

Peter

Yes Peter,

For me dough management has become more about experience than anything else. For three years I was mobile and followed the same workflow. I would bulk anywhere between 5-12 hours based on the weather. I have made pizzas outside in temperatures ranging from 15 degrees to 110 degrees. I believe that once you have the experience of making pizzas and  managing dough in all these different types of settings, the shop setting becomes much more of a normality. I really just trust my experience when it comes to what is happening with the dough. Just none of the pizzas we made tonight pictures below.
« Last Edit: January 22, 2021, 08:43:19 PM by Little bean »

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


 

wordpress