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Author Topic: Over-kneaded or under-kneaded?  (Read 1156 times)

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Offline schibetta

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  • Location: France
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Over-kneaded or under-kneaded?
« Reply #20 on: September 29, 2021, 04:32:18 PM »
schibetta,

When I was trying to reverse engineer and clone the Papa John's basic dough, I added the oil up front. I started with over 7% oil but after learning more about their dough, I went to 5.5% oil. In all instances, I simply assumed that PJ added the oil up front in its commissaries, simply because it seemed to me to be the simplest and most direct method in an automated process. Later, I learned about the delayed oil addition method from the late Tom Lehmann.

To be honest, I did not encounter any problems adding the oil up front. And I think the photos of the various PJ clones show that decent results can be achieved using the up front addition of oil. You can see photos at:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=6758.msg58195#msg58195

My advice is to try both methods of oil addition and see which works better for you. And that might vary from one type of pizza to another. And the results might be different in a commercial setting than in a typical home setting because of the different mixers.

Seeing that you are in France, you may be aware that PJ has at least one pizzeria there. See, for example, the article at:

https://ir.papajohns.com/news-releases/news-release-details/papa-johns-international-opens-first-restaurant-northeastern

Peter

Thanks Peter, I will look at your Papa Johns Clone thread, it might be interesting. I've never tried Papa Johns.

Offline Willthepizzamaker

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  • Location: Los Angeles
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Re: Over-kneaded or under-kneaded?
« Reply #21 on: October 01, 2021, 02:29:41 AM »
Iím lazy and didnít read well but if it was doing on Hobart plantery mixer,

I would store flour, water, salt in the walk in and keep everything very very cold. Also I would mix good 20 minutes. Keep final dough temperature no more than 23C if itís 50lbs mass.

Also for sourdough I use high w rate flours to be safe and use very little starter only because you never know what will happen in commercial setting.

Itís not making dough that is amazing for 2 hours but good for good 6 hours. One thing that made me very hard to get over it. When I was starting to use more technique on my dough.

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