A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Author Topic: Sweet airy pan pizza dough for a dummy  (Read 424 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline chunk28

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 7
  • Location: Spartansburg, Pennsylvania
  • I Love Pizza!
Sweet airy pan pizza dough for a dummy
« on: March 25, 2023, 06:18:18 AM »
Hello Iím looking for a dough recipe for a 16 inch pan pizza. that a rookie dough maker can follow that has more flavor than this one I made. I used the pan pizza dough recipe from this forum but I didnít have any dry milk so I used real milk and it was good but the dough lacked flavor. I used capitol 00 red flour but I do have some King Arthur
All purpose that I could use if needed thanks for your input and time
« Last Edit: March 25, 2023, 09:32:22 AM by Pete-zza »

Online kori

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3048
  • Age: 50
  • Location: Ontario, Canada
  • Let's make pizza today!
Re: Sweet airy pan pizza dough for a dummy
« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2023, 05:31:47 PM »
I dont have a recipe for you but I can say ditch the 00 and use the KAAP.
I SMILE AND WAVE....
Inhale pizza, exhale negativity.

Halo Versa 16 ready for duty!

Offline foreplease

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 10336
  • Age: 63
  • Location: St. Joseph, MI
Re: Sweet airy pan pizza dough for a dummy
« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2023, 06:42:13 PM »
You could try replacing half the formulaís water with scalded (and cooled) milk. Technically it is not a 1:1 exchange for water due to milk solids and fat butís hardly worth differentiating for you one pizza. Yours looks nicely baked. Brown = flavor. Are you happy with the degree of browning on the crust and the toppings?


If there is not any sugar in your dough you could consider adding sugar in the amount of 2% of the flourís weight. Same for oil. Iím guessing a forum recipe for pan pizza already called for both. Lastly, if you used oil in the pan try shortening next time. It will help your dough adhere to the pan (which does not look like something you had trouble with) and brown/caramelize differently than oil.


Really, more information is needed about the dough you made. A link to it? Length of time fermenting (rising) also contributes to flavor. How long from the time you finished mixing this dough until you baked it?
-Tony

Offline chunk28

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 7
  • Location: Spartansburg, Pennsylvania
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Sweet airy pan pizza dough for a dummy
« Reply #3 on: March 25, 2023, 09:32:15 PM »
I canít remember the recipe I used I found it on a pizza making forum and I let it rise the first time in the oven with the light on no heat  for a few hours then I put in in the pan and placed it in the fridge overnight and madethe pizza the next day
It was good happy with the look I made two more today for dinner tomorrow with some sugar in the dough this time and I weighed the ingredients out on a scale so it should be better thank everyone for the advice and help itís definitely a science and a fun one to learn

Offline wotavidone

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2768
  • Location: South Australia
  • A pizza is not a pie
Re: Sweet airy pan pizza dough for a dummy
« Reply #4 on: March 27, 2023, 11:04:22 AM »
it was good but the dough lacked flavor
How much salt did you use, mate? The one time I really was disappointed by the flavour of the dough was at a flash whacko upmarket wood fired joint.
I swear it was bland because there was not enough salt in it. Also, sub in a little whole wheat flour, say 10% of your total flour weight.
Lastly, if you used oil in the pan try shortening next time. It will help your dough adhere to the pan
We want pan pizza to stick to the pan? :o
Mick

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Offline TheRealJonnyD

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 461
  • Location: NY
  • All pizzas are beautiful.
Re: Sweet airy pan pizza dough for a dummy
« Reply #5 on: March 27, 2023, 08:47:34 PM »
We want pan pizza to stick to the pan? :o

 :-D it only sticks while cold! It's good for getting the dough to stretch into the pan sufficiently, especially the damn corners that love to come up short on a square pie or if you're trying to get your dough to go up the sides of a pan a bit.
Jon

Offline foreplease

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 10336
  • Age: 63
  • Location: St. Joseph, MI
Re: Sweet airy pan pizza dough for a dummy
« Reply #6 on: March 27, 2023, 09:34:08 PM »
:-D it only sticks while cold! It's good for getting the dough to stretch into the pan sufficiently, especially the damn corners that love to come up short on a square pie or if you're trying to get your dough to go up the sides of a pan a bit.
Thank you.
-Tony

Offline Puzzolento

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 624
  • Location: The South
Re: Sweet airy pan pizza dough for a dummy
« Reply #7 on: March 28, 2023, 06:02:27 PM »
Milk in pizza dough? That's new to me.

I've found that just about any flour will make a great Sicilian, but I have doubts about 00.
Unsuccessful people have the best cell phones.

Sicilian pizza is Godzilla. Thin pizza is Japan.

Offline Timpanogos Slim

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1778
  • Age: 47
  • Location: Utah
  • Pizza time! Pizza time! Pizza time!
Re: Sweet airy pan pizza dough for a dummy
« Reply #8 on: April 06, 2023, 09:13:10 PM »
Milk in pizza dough? That's new to me.

I've found that just about any flour will make a great Sicilian, but I have doubts about 00.

From https://opentextbc.ca/ingredients/chapter/milk-in-bread-baking/

Quote
Milk in Bread Baking
In the dough stage, milk increases water absorption. Consequently, dough made with milk should come softer from the mixer than dough made with water. Other aspects of milk in yeast doughs include:

Dough may be mixed more intensively.
Milk yields dough with a higher pH compared to water dough, and the fermentation will be slower.
Fermentation tolerance (the ability of the dough to work properly in a range of temperatures) will be slightly improved.
Bench time will be extended as the dough ferments more slowly at this stage. (Final proof times will be about the same, as by this time the yeast has adjusted to the condition of the dough.)
Bread made with milk will colour faster in the oven and allowance should be made for this. If taken out too early after a superficial examination of crust colour, it may collapse slightly and be hard to slice. The loaf should be expected to have a darker crust colour than bread made without milk.

In the finished product, milk will make bread that has:

Greater volume (improved capacity to retain gas)
Darker crust (due to the lactose in the milk)
Longer shelf life (due partly to the milk fat)
Finer and more ďcottonyĒ grain
Better slicing due to the finer grain
If skim milk or skim milk powder is used, some of the above benefits will not be so evident (e.g., longer shelf life, which is a result of the fat in the milk).

The type of sugar found in milk, lactose, has little sweetening power and does not ferment, so in dough made with skim milk powder, sugar has to be added or the fermentation will be very slow. While lactose is not fermentable, it caramelizes readily in the oven and produces a healthy crust colour. The recommended amount of skim milk powder used in fermented dough is 2% to 8% based on flour, and up 15% in cakes.

Buttermilk and sour milk are used to make variety breads. They have a lower pH and require a shorter fermentation for good results.

Though the thing about slow ferments because there's lactose in the mix sounds off to me. There are other sugars for the yeast to eat.

The pizzahut pan clone recipe i tried ages ago had nonfat dry milk in it, as do some of the lunch lady recipes.
There are many kinds of pizza, and *Most of them can be really good.
- Eric

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


 

wordpress