Pizza Making Forum

Pizza Making => New York Style => Topic started by: classicalthunder on October 08, 2019, 12:16:38 PM

Title: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: classicalthunder on October 08, 2019, 12:16:38 PM
Has anyone had any luck cloning Scarr's recipe?  I've watched the BA "Making Perfect Pizza" recipe and it give some clues, but not enough.  From the video we know that hes using:

- some portion fresh milled flour
- non-bromated flour (maybe non-bleached too?)
- Biano Di Napoli tomatoes
- 775g to make a 19-20" pizza, (TF of between .0965 and .087)

Was thinking of adjusting my current NY dough recipe to the TF and subbing in 20% 'bolted' hard wheat from a local mill and see if that makes a difference...

any thoughts or ideas?
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: classicalthunder on October 25, 2019, 10:32:35 AM
I'm not sure if anyone is following, but I made the dough last night with an initial formulation of the following:

100% flour (85% KABF, 15% fresh milled 'bolted' hard flour)
62% water
2.75% fine sea salt
2.50% evoo
2% sugar
0.30% IDY

575g per 16-inch dough

doing a one day cold bulk ferment, then will ball up for another 2-days in the fridge
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: TravisNTexas on October 25, 2019, 11:55:16 AM
Looking forward to the pictures!
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: bakeshack on October 25, 2019, 12:32:47 PM
I played around with a Scarr’s style dough a few weeks ago as I wanted to do a side by side with my current/preferred dough formula and I think it came out pretty close.  Here is the formula/workflow I used if it would help you out. 

90% Bread flour (I used Central Milling/Power flour even mix)
10% Whole wheat (fresh mulled)
64% Water
3% olive oil
4% salt
0.8% Fresh yeast

24 hr cold bulk ferment, divide and ball, CF until needed or leave out 4 hrs at RT if using that day.  Bake at 550F deck temp for 5 mins.  I used Bianco crushed, grande mozz, oregano, parm, olive oil.

Dough weight is 775g for a 19” pie post bake.   

Hope this helps! 

Marlon



Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: Meatsweats86 on October 25, 2019, 01:54:19 PM
Great looking Pie bakeshack. Was that done on a stone or steel?

I've watched a lot of youtube videos and best pizza shows and Scarr's always comes up in the top 5 places. Would like to see this thread take off and get this re creation dialed in!
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on October 25, 2019, 02:47:54 PM


   Nice one Marlon..... Very nice!  :chef: 8)
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: readefoong on October 25, 2019, 02:49:20 PM
Your pizza looks epic! Quick question: when you folded the slice to eat it, did the base crack? Keep up the great pizza.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: bakeshack on October 25, 2019, 02:59:23 PM
Thanks guys!  Also, don’t be afraid of the higher than normal salt content.  It’s perfect to hold the dough together.  This was baked on a stone deck.

Your pizza looks epic! Quick question: when you folded the slice to eat it, did the base crack? Keep up the great pizza.

No crack when folded.  Here is a closer look of the folded slice.  It had a pronounced crunchy/crispy shell that  gives way to a tender interior.  Not much chew though since you don’t have to really pull on it when biting on the slice. 

Sorry the pizza on the top portion is not the same pie.  I’m
Referring to the bottom pie at this picture. 
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: readefoong on October 25, 2019, 03:05:31 PM
Sick! Can't wait to try it out myself.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: classicalthunder on October 28, 2019, 09:21:54 AM
here are the pics from this weekends attempt.  Overall it made a good pizza, although it definitely lacked the outside crunch that i recall from Scarr's.  I initially used 15% fresh milled grain, you could definitely see the difference in the raw dough (more color to it, brown flecks) but the fresh milled flour was 'bolted' so all the coarsest pieces were removed.  I think next time I'll use the kind with the bran and germ mixed in, i may also kick it up to 20%

One thing i was lacking was the char on the bottom (sorry forgot to include a pic of the underside), for my oven i generally pre-heat the steel for an hour to 500f, throw a pizza in to cook for 6 min and switch to broiler-only about 90 seconds into the cook.  I think i might let it sit on the steel for 2-3 min and then do the broiler for top color to see if that helps the bottom char.  That and my dough opening, shaping skills need to improve

second and third pics are a cheese/pepperoni/caramelized onion, the last pic is kale/pickled red onions with a calabrian chili cream base per Beddia's Pizza Camp
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: classicalthunder on October 28, 2019, 09:52:14 AM
I played around with a Scarr’s style dough a few weeks ago as I wanted to do a side by side with my current/preferred dough formula and I think it came out pretty close.  Here is the formula/workflow I used if it would help you out. 

90% Bread flour (I used Central Milling/Power flour even mix)
10% Whole wheat (fresh mulled)
64% Water
3% olive oil
4% salt
0.8% Fresh yeast

24 hr cold bulk ferment, divide and ball, CF until needed or leave out 4 hrs at RT if using that day.  Bake at 550F deck temp for 5 mins.  I used Bianco crushed, grande mozz, oregano, parm, olive oil.

Dough weight is 775g for a 19” pie post bake.   

Hope this helps! 

Marlon

Thanks!  I'll try this forumla out next time and see compares to my first run!  do you cook in a professional kitchen?  I'd love to crank out a 18 or 19-inch pie, but am constrained by a home oven and 17" square steel
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: jsaras on October 28, 2019, 10:10:01 AM
4% salt?  You must be drinking a gallon of water afterwards!
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: foreplease on October 28, 2019, 01:07:40 PM
4% salt?  You must be drinking a gallon of water afterwards!
I figure it’s like eating 2 pieces at 2%.  :P


Damn good looking pizzas. This one might be fun to try in the Ardore.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: bakeshack on October 29, 2019, 06:58:40 PM
4% salt?  You must be drinking a gallon of water afterwards!

Not salty at all. 
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: hotsawce on October 29, 2019, 07:41:42 PM
This looks very close. The dough skin in particular looks a lot like Scarr's. I wouldn't go up to 20% freshly milled. The video suggest white wheat for the fresh milled portion....

here are the pics from this weekends attempt.  Overall it made a good pizza, although it definitely lacked the outside crunch that i recall from Scarr's.  I initially used 15% fresh milled grain, you could definitely see the difference in the raw dough (more color to it, brown flecks) but the fresh milled flour was 'bolted' so all the coarsest pieces were removed.  I think next time I'll use the kind with the bran and germ mixed in, i may also kick it up to 20%

One thing i was lacking was the char on the bottom (sorry forgot to include a pic of the underside), for my oven i generally pre-heat the steel for an hour to 500f, throw a pizza in to cook for 6 min and switch to broiler-only about 90 seconds into the cook.  I think i might let it sit on the steel for 2-3 min and then do the broiler for top color to see if that helps the bottom char.  That and my dough opening, shaping skills need to improve

second and third pics are a cheese/pepperoni/caramelized onion, the last pic is kale/pickled red onions with a calabrian chili cream base per Beddia's Pizza Camp
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: hotsawce on October 29, 2019, 07:44:16 PM
Yea, because a jump from 2% or 2.5% to 4% is soooooo large in the context of all that flour and water.  ::)

4% salt?  You must be drinking a gallon of water afterwards!
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: hotsawce on October 29, 2019, 07:45:45 PM
Some people here bake by numbers and don't bake frequently/taste different things unfortunately. I have no idea where this idea that anything over 2.5% salt makes a salty pizza.

Not salty at all.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: hammettjr on October 29, 2019, 08:27:53 PM
Some people here bake by numbers and don't bake frequently/taste different things unfortunately. I have no idea where this idea that anything over 2.5% salt makes a salty pizza.

The difference between 2% and 4% is probably close to the recommended amount of sodium for a person to eat in a day. (Without eating the entire pizza.)

Regardless, the perception of "saltiness" will vary based on the amount of sodium you generally eat. People build a tolerance for it...

Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on October 29, 2019, 08:29:06 PM
I took a stab at summarizing salt usage at Reply 9 at:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=58380.msg585546#msg585546

I suppose that if one uses no salt in the sauce, and the cheese is of a type that has little salt (such as a bufala mozzarella cheese for a Neapolitan style pizza) or the amount of cheese is on the low side, and there are veggies on the pizza, a 4% salt level in the dough might not be noticed on the palate.

Peter
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: parallei on October 29, 2019, 08:54:14 PM
Some people here bake by numbers  The "numbers" are a great place to start and don't bake frequently/taste different things unfortunately Most here bake frequently or they wouldn't be here. Many people here travel around the country/world tasting things. . I have no idea where this idea that anything over 2.5% salt makes a salty pizza.  I don't think anyone has ever said anything over 2.5% makes a salty dough.  Everyone has their own tastes.  Personally, I don't want to notice the absence, or presence, of salt in the dough. But that is just me. And for me that is between 2% and 2.5% salt.  Everyone is allowed to have their own tastes.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: jsaras on October 29, 2019, 09:35:33 PM
Yea, because a jump from 2% or 2.5% to 4% is soooooo large in the context of all that flour and water.  ::)

There’s a 100% difference between 2% and 4%.  It’s called math.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on October 29, 2019, 10:25:21 PM


   Jump Cut!!!   😆
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: hotsawce on October 29, 2019, 10:50:13 PM
No duh, really? So let’s do the math, shall we?

Let’s say we’re making a 12” pie. 150g of that is flour, 90g of that is water. 240g doughball. 2% salt is 3 grams. 4% is 6 grams. A 3 g difference across an entire 12” pie, including the crust. 3g is a 3 finger pinch. That’s tiny.

Many professional operators use that amount or more, and it’s not “thirst inducing” like you make it out to be. If I had you do a taste test side by side, you’d hardy even notice. Scarr’s is up around that 4% mark. Others are, too, including a well regarded spot you attempted to call out on Instagram  :-D

Didn’t you claim you went from 2% to 2.2% and your pizza became “unbearably salty?” Sounds like user error to me. Or you have the Marvel equivalent of tastebuds


There’s a 100% difference between 2% and 4%.  It’s called math.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on October 29, 2019, 11:02:22 PM


   Jump Cut!!  🤣
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: parallei on October 29, 2019, 11:11:02 PM
No duh, really? So let’s do the math, shall we?.........

It is not simpley a matter of math.  It is a matter of the impact of the ingredient/amount on taste. As an extreme example, if one were to add 2% more water to a dough it is doubtful anyone would notice a difference in taste.  If one were to add 1% sugar to a dough that previously had none, most would not notice a difference in taste.  Salt, to me, is different creature and has a more pronounced and noticeable impact on taste.  I'm certain I would notice the difference between a 2% and 4% salt dough. 
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: jsaras on October 29, 2019, 11:22:40 PM
No duh, really? So let’s do the math, shall we?

Let’s say we’re making a 12” pie. 150g of that is flour, 90g of that is water. 240g doughball. 2% salt is 3 grams. 4% is 6 grams. A 3 g difference across an entire 12” pie, including the crust. 3g is a 3 finger pinch. That’s tiny.

Many professional operators use that amount or more, and it’s not “thirst inducing” like you make it out to be. If I had you do a taste test side by side, you’d hardy even notice. Scarr’s is up around that 4% mark. Others are, too, including a well regarded spot you attempted to call out on Instagram  :-D

Didn’t you claim you went from 2% to 2.2% and your pizza became “unbearably salty?” Sounds like user error to me. Or you have the Marvel equivalent of tastebuds

3 grams is more than a half teaspoon.  A pinch is 0.10 teaspoon.  Your math and your tastebuds need calibration. 
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: jsaras on October 29, 2019, 11:54:04 PM
It is not simpley a matter of math.  It is a matter of the impact of the ingredient/amount on taste. As an extreme example, if one were to add 2% more water to a dough it is doubtful anyone would notice a difference in taste.  If one were to add 1% sugar to a dough that previously had none, most would not notice a difference in taste.  Salt, to me, is different creature and has a more pronounced and noticeable impact on taste.  I'm certain I would notice the difference between a 2% and 4% salt dough.

Nailing the salt content is difficult to do and it requires significant forethought.  For pasta water, I use a 1% solution, but for brining chicken I use a 5% solution; and these figures work for my dishes that have other salted elements in them. 

I’ve had Neapolitan pizza dough with 2.8% salt that was tolerable because the other elements on the pizza were not salty (straight tomatoes and fresh mozz), and I’ve had NY dough at 2.2% that had me reaching for at least a quart of water afterwards.

I’ve often wondered how Tom Lehmann arrived at 1.75% salt.  Michael Ruhlman’s book “Ratio” defines bread dough as 60% water and 2% salt, which is basically a Lehmann dough as well. 

There are points where food is under-salted as well as over-salted and it is often the difference between a great dish and a bland one. 
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: bakeshack on October 29, 2019, 11:57:39 PM
I would suggest to the skeptics to try it first with an open mind.   I’ve done it several times and have not noticed any “salty” flavor to the pizza  especially when you consider the overall experience with the balance of sauce, cheese, etc.  It’s far from salty and offensive to the tastebuds.  I don’t know.  Maybe my tastebuds are already immune from making and eating pizza almost everyday!  ???

If you try the formula, you will notice that the salt amount is perfect to hold the dough together and make it a bit stronger considering the slightly higher hydration and higher oil content in the dough. 
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: hotsawce on October 30, 2019, 12:44:15 AM
I literally weighed it out on a jewelers scale and held it in my hand before making that statement  :-D

You need to worry less abour salt and more about basic technique, Jonas. I do this for a living

3 grams is more than a half teaspoon.  A pinch is 0.10 teaspoon.  Your math and your tastebuds need calibration.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on October 30, 2019, 12:58:52 AM
What about the salt level in consideration of fermentation.... And how/when salt it is applied during dough preparation?

Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: classicalthunder on October 30, 2019, 09:34:43 AM
This looks very close. The dough skin in particular looks a lot like Scarr's. I wouldn't go up to 20% freshly milled. The video suggest white wheat for the fresh milled portion....

thanks for the input guys!  I think for the second round I'll do the following:

A) keep it at 15% and stick with the 'bolted' hard fresh flour (per @hotsawce)
B) try a 2-3 min bake, and 3-4 broil rather than my standard 1.5 min bake and 5 min broil to see if that improves the bottom
C) play around with the percentages, maybe try 4% salt, 3% oil, 2% sugar and see how that goes (per @bakeshake) and then i'll have a top line and a bottom line

also part of it is probably aesthetics, i need to work on better shaping dough (avoiding a thin middle) and getting the sauce and a better defined crust

I'm away for the next couple of weekends (one of which i'm on a brewery and pizza road trip tour!), so i'll be able to give it another whirl mid-month and will follow up with some updates!
Title: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: jsaras on October 30, 2019, 10:00:32 AM
I literally weighed it out on a jewelers scale and held it in my hand before making that statement  :-D

You need to worry less abour salt and more about basic technique, Jonas. I do this for a living

If you’re willing to accept 100% variability in an ingredient, why do you bother with a scale at all?
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: bakeshack on October 30, 2019, 02:13:38 PM
Remember that this is a thread about recreating Scarr’s pizza and as far as I know (unless new and reliable info comes out), the salt level in their dough is quite high and is believed to be close or at 4%.  It doesn’t matter if you think 4% is beyond edible or not.  I was surprised as well but the dough I made did not taste ‘salty’ and certainly did not make me want to drink a quart or a gallon of water!  🤯. If you eat pizza and it makes you want to drink that much water, I guarantee you the first suspect would not be your dough!
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: hotsawce on October 30, 2019, 02:15:30 PM
You should go back to making your mediocre looking cardboard pizzas (I'd send it back...) and keep the commentary to yourself. We were really close at getting classicalthunder to a Scarr's clone before you chimed in.

Your comment is really funny - your favorite pizzeria is Da Michele...a pizzeria that just eyeballs whatever goes in the mixer  :-D

If you’re willing to accept 100% variability in an ingredient, why do you bother with a scale at all?
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: hotsawce on October 30, 2019, 02:25:46 PM
No sugar. The oil looks to be between 3 and 4% to me - it looks like close to a full quart container in the video which would be closer to 4% but 3% is a good place to start. I would still suggest keeping the fresh flour around 10% for now.

when pressing, try to avoid the center of the dough. When you pick it up, that will stretch itself.

thanks for the input guys!  I think for the second round I'll do the following:

A) keep it at 15% and stick with the 'bolted' hard fresh flour (per @hotsawce)
B) try a 2-3 min bake, and 3-4 broil rather than my standard 1.5 min bake and 5 min broil to see if that improves the bottom
C) play around with the percentages, maybe try 4% salt, 3% oil, 2% sugar and see how that goes (per @bakeshake) and then i'll have a top line and a bottom line

also part of it is probably aesthetics, i need to work on better shaping dough (avoiding a thin middle) and getting the sauce and a better defined crust

I'm away for the next couple of weekends (one of which i'm on a brewery and pizza road trip tour!), so i'll be able to give it another whirl mid-month and will follow up with some updates!
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: bakeshack on October 30, 2019, 02:30:03 PM

when pressing, try to avoid the center of the dough. When you pick it up, that will stretch itself.

Exactly like this!  keep the center thick and it will even out when you pick it up.  No effort whatsoever. 
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: classicalthunder on October 30, 2019, 03:25:13 PM
No sugar. The oil looks to be between 3 and 4% to me - it looks like close to a full quart container in the video which would be closer to 4% but 3% is a good place to start. I would still suggest keeping the fresh flour around 10% for now.

when pressing, try to avoid the center of the dough. When you pick it up, that will stretch itself.

Thanks, I try and do the edge stretch that Scott123 pointed out a while ago, but i guess practice makes perfect.

Do you think omitting the sugar will have a significant impact on browning?
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: hotsawce on October 30, 2019, 04:52:35 PM
If you want to replicate a Scarr's slice, Scarr's dough does not use sugar. I am unsure if his flour is malted but I don't believe so. His pies are adequately brown, but they also bake pretty hot. My guess is 620 to 650.

His dough is also pretty soft - there's a small amount of edge stretching but not much. It looks like 1) forming of the crust (important for the look of his pies,) 2) pressing around the crust area 3) a small edge stretch and finally 4) the back and forth motion between the arms for the final stretch.

He uses a little more dough than most and, with his slightly softer dough, you can do that arm motion without the dough getting too thin in the center.

Thanks, I try and do the edge stretch that Scott123 pointed out a while ago, but i guess practice makes perfect.

Do you think omitting the sugar will have a significant impact on browning?
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: SuperTz on November 06, 2019, 09:13:33 PM
Followed Bakeshack’s recipe to a T. Not salty at all with 4% salt. I’ve been making nothing but Detroit style for the past few months and apparently I’ve forgotten how to properly launch a pie into my oven so this is the only photo I took. Thanks for the recipe Marlon.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: hotsawce on November 07, 2019, 08:11:07 PM
More photos! The color looks to be there....

Followed Bakeshack’s recipe to a T. Not salty at all with 4% salt. I’ve been making nothing but Detroit style for the past few months and apparently I’ve forgotten how to properly launch a pie into my oven so this is the only photo I took. Thanks for the recipe Marlon.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: SuperTz on November 08, 2019, 09:37:17 AM
I only made enough for 2 dough balls but I’ll try mixing again this weekend. I’m a big fan of this dough and again for me the salt wasn’t an issue. This might me the tastiest pizza I’ve made to date and with Bakeshack’s assistance I’ve made some pretty good pies over the past 6 months.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: bakeshack on November 08, 2019, 11:59:39 AM
Awesome pies!  Same dough can be used to do Scarr’s sicilian.  I hope you didn’t have to drink a gallon of water after eating those pies!   ;D
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on November 08, 2019, 06:37:34 PM
☠️🐴
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: wotavidone on November 09, 2019, 12:52:11 AM
Apropos of nothing, an observation about salt I have made before that continues to intrigue me.
When you make a dough with around 650g of water and around 25g (2.5%), you are essentially making your dough with seawater.
It never fails to astonish me - if I drank seawater, I can just about guarantee I'd regurgitate it. But make dough without it and it is as bland as can be.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: jsaras on November 09, 2019, 09:23:15 AM
The average salinity of sea water is most commonly cited as 3.5%.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: wotavidone on November 09, 2019, 02:28:54 PM
The average salinity of sea water is most commonly cited as 3.5%.
Yes "standard" seawater is taken to be 35. i.e. it is taken to have the same conductivity as a solution of 35 g/L sodium chloride salts.
The range of seawater salinity around the world is about 30 to 50 g/L.
In my neck of the woods it's 42 g/L. I live in an area where the evaporation rate is not matched by recharge from rainfall, it's an "inverse estuary".

Anyway, when we add 2.5% salt to 65% hydration dough, we are giving that water a salinity of 25 /650*1000 = 38g/L
i.e. 38g per 1000g  of water.
or 3.8 g per 100g of water
or 3.8%
i.e. we are making pizzas with seawater which, although it has not much to do with this thread, I find fascinating.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: hotsawce on November 09, 2019, 06:19:15 PM
Now I'm jealous. Just incredible.

If you want to make Scarr's Sicilian, I believe the dough is triple baked. Par baked naked, baked until the shredded cheese (fresh and aged I think?) melts slightly, sauced with a basic tomato sauce (I think it's unseasoned for the square) and baked until finished.

I only made enough for 2 dough balls but I’ll try mixing again this weekend. I’m a big fan of this dough and again for me the salt wasn’t an issue. This might me the tastiest pizza I’ve made to date and with Bakeshack’s assistance I’ve made some pretty good pies over the past 6 months.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: colebg on December 29, 2019, 08:15:07 PM
insightful video showing some of the dough making process 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b5dv_j9SdC0
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: colebg on January 03, 2020, 10:58:18 PM
found an even better video. saw a grande cheese box. It was almost a full instruction video.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yan892RXh5A
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: Elevatedpizzaco on January 05, 2020, 03:24:02 PM
I played around with a Scarr’s style dough a few weeks ago as I wanted to do a side by side with my current/preferred dough formula and I think it came out pretty close.  Here is the formula/workflow I used if it would help you out. 

90% Bread flour (I used Central Milling/Power flour even mix)
10% Whole wheat (fresh mulled)
64% Water
3% olive oil
4% salt
0.8% Fresh yeast

24 hr cold bulk ferment, divide and ball, CF until needed or leave out 4 hrs at RT if using that day.  Bake at 550F deck temp for 5 mins.  I used Bianco crushed, grande mozz, oregano, parm, olive oil.

Dough weight is 775g for a 19” pie post bake.   

Hope this helps! 

Marlon

How do you get those char bubbles etc from 5 minutes in a stone deck oven? I have a commercial electric stone deck oven for my pizzeria and 8 minutes at 600 doesn't even do that.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: scott r on January 06, 2020, 10:35:52 AM
8 minutes at 600 should definitely char.   I have a feeling your dough is either under or over fermented, try playing with that.   good luck!
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: hotsawce on January 25, 2020, 07:56:57 PM
He's also probably baking between 600 to 650. I've seen the knob on the oven cranked pretty high. Pretty well-fermented dough will take on those shades.... I also think some of the charring you see is just some thin spots or bubbles that have blown out because his dough is very airy.

How do you get those char bubbles etc from 5 minutes in a stone deck oven? I have a commercial electric stone deck oven for my pizzeria and 8 minutes at 600 doesn't even do that.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: TheSicialianSq on March 17, 2020, 08:55:46 PM
I played around with a Scarr’s style dough a few weeks ago as I wanted to do a side by side with my current/preferred dough formula and I think it came out pretty close.  Here is the formula/workflow I used if it would help you out. 

90% Bread flour (I used Central Milling/Power flour even mix)
10% Whole wheat (fresh mulled)
64% Water
3% olive oil
4% salt
0.8% Fresh yeast


24 hr cold bulk ferment, divide and ball, CF until needed or leave out 4 hrs at RT if using that day.  Bake at 550F deck temp for 5 mins.  I used Bianco crushed, grande mozz, oregano, parm, olive oil.

Dough weight is 775g for a 19” pie post bake.   

Hope this helps! 

Marlon






 Could you provide cook time and temp for the sicilian ?
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: HogInBlack on April 15, 2020, 03:17:55 PM
ok, I consider myself a pretty intelligent person, I have a MBA in Data Analytics, Delta Mu Delta Honors society, why is my brain fogging on these recipes? how does it add up to more than 100%?! 100% is total its everything, what am I missing here about these ratios?
thanks in advance for the help
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: jsaras on April 15, 2020, 03:28:21 PM
ok, I consider myself a pretty intelligent person, I have a MBA in Data Analytics, Delta Mu Delta Honors society, why is my brain fogging on these recipes? how does it add up to more than 100%?! 100% is total its everything, what am I missing here about these ratios?
thanks in advance for the help

It's confusing, but it is correct.  In bakers percentages, flour weight is always listed as "100%" and all the other individual ingredient weights are in relation to that.  So, of you had equal parts flour and water, it's not 50/50 but 100/100.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: jkb on April 15, 2020, 03:52:32 PM
what am I missing here about these ratios?

You answered your own question.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: HogInBlack on April 15, 2020, 08:23:20 PM
It's confusing, but it is correct.  In bakers percentages, flour weight is always listed as "100%" and all the other individual ingredient weights are in relation to that.  So, of you had equal parts flour and water, it's not 50/50 but 100/100.


Thank you Jsaras, I was, as I suspected missing something really basic. Just to clarify if Im using 100g flour id use 64 % of that water, %oil, %salt,%ADY?
Appreciate you answering a noob question
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on April 15, 2020, 08:28:44 PM
Flour 100%.  100g
Water. 60%.     60g
Salt.     3%.         3g
Oil.        2%.         2g
Etc.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: HogInBlack on April 15, 2020, 08:38:38 PM
Flour 100%.  100g
Water. 60%.     60g
Salt.     3%.         3g
Oil.        2%.         2g
Etc.

Thanks Chi Town Bob, going to start working on a recipe to get close to some of the old Brooklyn style shops, Scarr's looks like a great starting point, if we ever get out of quarantine I can finally close on a house and build a proper pizza oven.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: gmladdison on May 11, 2020, 11:26:47 AM
I made a very similar dough to the one Marlon posted. Went down to 3% salt though, and up to 4% olive oil(which was a mistake when I poured it in whoops!) I cooked it in an Ooni oven and it was really excellent. I am completely sold on the addition of 10% whole wheat. Mine came from Castle Valley Mill out of PA its a very rustic flour with the wheat germ left in it.

Thanks Marlon for the excellent recipe, can’t wait to make more pizza!

Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: Glutenboy on May 11, 2020, 05:27:47 PM
I made a very similar dough to the one Marlon posted. Went down to 3% salt though, and up to 4% olive oil(which was a mistake when I poured it in whoops!) I cooked it in an Ooni oven and it was really excellent. I am completely sold on the addition of 10% whole wheat. Mine came from Castle Valley Mill out of PA its a very rustic flour with the wheat germ left in it.

Thanks Marlon for the excellent recipe, can’t wait to make more pizza!
That looks amazing.  Beautiful oven spring.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: Movefast on May 13, 2020, 10:38:10 PM
I played around with a Scarr’s style dough a few weeks ago as I wanted to do a side by side with my current/preferred dough formula and I think it came out pretty close.  Here is the formula/workflow I used if it would help you out. 

90% Bread flour (I used Central Milling/Power flour even mix)
10% Whole wheat (fresh mulled)
64% Water
3% olive oil
4% salt
0.8% Fresh yeast

24 hr cold bulk ferment, divide and ball, CF until needed or leave out 4 hrs at RT if using that day.  Bake at 550F deck temp for 5 mins.  I used Bianco crushed, grande mozz, oregano, parm, olive oil.

Dough weight is 775g for a 19” pie post bake.   

Hope this helps! 

Marlon

Given the pandemic, can’t get my hands on fresh milled whole wheat, would regular all purpose whole wheat work??
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on May 13, 2020, 10:41:46 PM
@10%.... It's not gonna matter mater.    ;)
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: nbodden329 on May 22, 2020, 11:02:35 PM
I played around with a Scarr’s style dough a few weeks ago as I wanted to do a side by side with my current/preferred dough formula and I think it came out pretty close.  Here is the formula/workflow I used if it would help you out. 

90% Bread flour (I used Central Milling/Power flour even mix)
10% Whole wheat (fresh mulled)
64% Water
3% olive oil
4% salt
0.8% Fresh yeast

24 hr cold bulk ferment, divide and ball, CF until needed or leave out 4 hrs at RT if using that day.  Bake at 550F deck temp for 5 mins.  I used Bianco crushed, grande mozz, oregano, parm, olive oil.

Dough weight is 775g for a 19” pie post bake.   

Hope this helps! 

Marlon




Tried this dough the other day, worked out really well! In my opinion dough was the best on day 3. Thanks for sharing!
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: mikeshole on May 27, 2020, 07:33:01 AM
If we can go hotter, say 600, 650, 700 or 750 for a shorter cook then should we? Or is the recipe designed for 500-550? I've never made pizza before and wanted to try this out as my first one.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: JTreehorn on May 27, 2020, 02:30:01 PM
Tried Bakeshack's formula this past weekend after falling in love with Scarrs on an NYC visit this past Dec.  I cooked one off after 48hr and loved it, then another one last night at 72 hours and the dough flavor tasted even more balanced.  Baked at 500F on baking steel for about 6 min.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: ak47e6 on May 28, 2020, 10:16:33 PM
So thought I’d give this a go and this may be way off but was kind of fun so here goes. 

Videos posted from Bon Appetit and Eater on your tube.

Let me know if you think this is close based on what was in those videos and what adjustments you would make
 
Assumptions
60quart Hobart??
Oil, salt and yeast in a 32oz soup container.

Water: Looks like in the Bon Appetit video the water is about 25% of the 60qrt bowl or 15 qrts x 946g/quart is ~14000g

Flour. Didn’t see how many tubs they added so assumed they use 50# of flour or 22650g. Bon Appetit he says he does a 50/50 blend of high and low protein and then adds some of his flour that he grinds in house.

Salt. It’s about 75% full in a 32oz container. 32 oz is about 64 tablespoons and there are 17g of salt in one tablespoon 64 x 17g x .75 =816

Oil. Again 75% full 32oz container at 64 tablespoons and 13g per tablespoon is 64 x 13 x .75 =624

Yeast was kind of tough as he was holding at an angle.  His 3rd finger comes about 2 inches above The bottom of the 5.5 inch container which is about the level of the yeast. Estimated between 1/2 and 1 cup. Looks like 149g of fresh yeast per cup ( not sure if that’s packed or not just a guess)

Flour 22650g (50/50 high/low protein )
Water 14000g (61.8%)
Fresh Yeast 75g to 150g (.32% to .64%)
Salt 815g (3.6%)
Oil 624g (2.8%)

In the Eater video he says he combines the yeast and water and allows it to sit to dissolve for several hours.

He then adds flour and mixes until it forms a dough, In the Bon Appetit video he adjusts the water qty and looks like he lets it sit for a while prior to adding salt.

Once it sits he starts mixing again and adds the salt and oil.

In the Eater video he says he does a bulk ferment of 4 to 5 hours prior to balling.

Balls are 775g from the Bon Appetit video.

He then says they do a 2 to 3 day CF from the Eater Video.

After CF he says they do 2 to 3 hours room temp prior to use from the Eater video but in the Bon Appetit video he says they “pull them out and allow them to rise all day on the day of use”.

Thoughts?

Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: Chi_Guy on May 29, 2020, 09:17:46 AM

In the Eater video he says he combines the yeast and water and allows it to sit to dissolve for several hours.

Maybe I misheard but I thought he said they let it sit for a couple of hours, not several.  What would be the benefit of it? How long does the CY survive suspended in water like that?

Quote
He then says they do a 2 to 3 day CF from the Eater Video.

After CF he says they do 2 to 3 hours room temp prior to use from the Eater video but in the Bon Appetit video he says they “pull them out and allow them to rise all day on the day of use”.

Thoughts?

He also mentions that after mixing, they let it ferment for 4-5 hours at RT before balling.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: ak47e6 on May 29, 2020, 09:31:01 AM
Correct on both. Couple hours to let the yeast dissolve ( no clue why he would do that either. Have never seen that).

Then 4 to 5 hour RT ferment prior to balling

Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: scott r on May 29, 2020, 09:32:03 AM
I have had Scarr's pizza a few times now.   I have made and eaten a LOT of pizza over the years and while I don't know his exact salt level, I really don't think it is above 3%, and it is most likely a little less than that.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: ak47e6 on May 29, 2020, 09:46:23 AM
Does anyone have time to do a test?  I only have coarse salt right now so don’t think The weights would work as it looks like he is using fine salt. Here is a picture of the container ( looks like a standard 32oz soup container). I measured last night and the total container is 5.5 inches and from the look of the video it comes to about the 4 inch mark. If someone has time and or salt could you weigh it and let us know?  The other assumption is that he is using 50# of flour which may be way off but the best guess I could come up with given the water amount and mixer size.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: RHawthorne on May 29, 2020, 11:11:25 AM
I have had Scarr's pizza a few times now.   I have made and eaten a LOT of pizza over the years and while I don't know his exact salt level, I really don't think it is above 3%, and it is most likely a little less than that.

I doubt that anybody's pizza dough goes much above 3%, or at least not in the professional pizza world. The 2%(ish) standard exists for a reason, right? That rough percentage is what has proven effective through the ages, and if you go much beyond that and you're not achieving any noticeable benefit, what's the point? Plus, it's a waste of money to use ingredients excessively, which is something any business owner is going to monitor closely.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: ak47e6 on May 29, 2020, 11:35:41 AM
I know that Neapolitan pizza uses around 2.9%. Salt has other effects other then taste as it strengthens the gluten network and also helps control fermentation. Looking at his video with the known variable of a 75% full 32oz soup container should allow us to work backwards to determine the weight of salt he uses. The only unknown is the qty of flour to base the ratio off of.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: scott r on May 29, 2020, 11:43:05 AM
Obviously Kosher vs fine make a big difference in volumetric measurement.   Even different brands of Kosher salt take up different amounts of space for the same weight.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: amolapizza on May 30, 2020, 08:04:05 AM
The humidity of the salt itself will also throw off weight measurements! :D
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: ak47e6 on May 30, 2020, 01:17:28 PM
So I did a test with Coarse Kosher and tried to get it to about the level he has in the video using the same container he used and it came to 839g. If someone has the same container and has some fine salt perhaps we could get a range. If he was using 50# of flour and Coarse Kosher salt he would be in the 3.7% range. Obviously there would be differences based on humidity and salt type but we could at least define a potential range.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: hotsawce on June 03, 2020, 11:22:30 PM
This was kind of my thinking. I doubt the hobart handles much over a 50lb bag so I would say 3.5% is probably on the low end and maybe up to 4% in terms of range.

So I did a test with Coarse Kosher and tried to get it to about the level he has in the video using the same container he used and it came to 839g. If someone has the same container and has some fine salt perhaps we could get a range. If he was using 50# of flour and Coarse Kosher salt he would be in the 3.7% range. Obviously there would be differences based on humidity and salt type but we could at least define a potential range.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: bradbind on July 27, 2020, 05:53:23 PM
Lot's of helpful information on this post. I have never tried pizza at Scarr's but have heard good things and liked reading the discussion. I used some of the percentages discussed and got solid results. I balled the dough right after mixing and made a pizzas at the 24, 48, and 72 hr marks. 72 was the tastiest by far. Now trying a batch with the addition of 2% sugar and doing a side by side test with IDY and CY. Doing a proper bulk ferment this time and will have to see what happens.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: naval2006 on July 27, 2020, 09:54:12 PM
How does whole wheat flour affect the dough and looks and taste of this pizza? I really want to give it a try.

Alex
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: Johnathan on July 29, 2020, 01:11:29 AM



Tried this dough the other day, worked out really well! In my opinion dough was the best on day 3. Thanks for sharing!
This is absolutely stunning.  :o
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: Quebert on July 29, 2020, 06:07:03 AM
Looks delicious, I would try this but I'm unable to show restraint around pizza.  I typically make mine with 200-250g balls and within 3 hours of it coming out the oven I'm eating the last slice. I fear eating an entire pizza with 4% salt would do things to me lol.  Maybe I could make it and eat 2 slices and tell somebody here to take the rest before I can woof it down.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: scott r on November 30, 2020, 12:18:00 AM
Just had Scarrs tonight. It was fantastic!  It was less salty than Song E' Napule and Biga Bite, which I had just before and after.   Im holding strong on his salt content being in the 2's somewhere. 
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: HansB on November 30, 2020, 07:22:33 AM
I had not heard of Biga Bite, the photos on the website look good. What did you think Scott?
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: scott r on November 30, 2020, 07:42:50 AM
I attached a photo of Biga Bite.  It was beautiful, very crispy pizza, especially for one baked in about 3 minutes. The biga gave the crust a nice flavor.   It was almost the opposite of Song, which is as you know, super soft, without any crisp, and song was maybe even softer last night than I have had it before (could be the new oven?).  Biga Bite was definitely different than NY or Neapolitan, and very different than my pizza at stoked that cooks in about the same amount of time.  I wish there had been more flavor to the toppings, but definitely an interesting spot doing something more different than the photos would suggest.  In the photos it sort of just looks like a slightly slower baked Neapolitan pizza, but this pizza was even crispier than the pizza I had a colony grill earlier in the night.     

Scarr's and Song are so good its hard to venture away from them when in this area, and as usual the spicy spring was bursting with an incredible amount of flavor.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: [email protected] on February 09, 2021, 05:17:26 PM
 
90% Bread flour (I used Central Milling/Power flour even mix)
10% Whole wheat (fresh mulled)


So I picked up some Bob’s Red Mill stone ground whole wheat flour to use for the 10-15% flour component in this recipe, but it’s not “bolted.” I was going to use KABF for the 85% portion. Googled up “bolted” hard flour available locally and ended up with KABF as the first option. Saw some other options available at the grocery that seem to be for lighter, finer pastries, but I thought the idea was to add a heartier flour, not a lighter flour.

Suspect I’m missing something.  Looks like you can order online and I see people bolt their own, but that seems a bit of a pain and not likely to achieve the 80% level of bran removal.

Suggestions on readily available brands?

Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: Pizza_Not_War on February 10, 2021, 12:53:03 AM
So I picked up some Bob’s Red Mill stone ground whole wheat flour to use for the 10-15% flour component in this recipe, but it’s not “bolted.” I was going to use KABF for the 85% portion. Googled up “bolted” hard flour available locally and ended up with KABF as the first option. Saw some other options available at the grocery that seem to be for lighter, finer pastries, but I thought the idea was to add a heartier flour, not a lighter flour.

Suspect I’m missing something.  Looks like you can order online and I see people bolt their own, but that seems a bit of a pain and not likely to achieve the 80% level of bran removal.

Suggestions on readily available brands?

Mostly I've seen bolted flours online from small independent mills or resellers. https://breadtopia.com/store/high-extaction-organic-soft-white-wheat-flour/ is a good company for supplies.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: [email protected] on February 10, 2021, 08:28:53 AM
Thanks for the reply, PNW. Will take a look.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: HansB on February 10, 2021, 08:32:43 AM
So I picked up some Bob’s Red Mill stone ground whole wheat flour to use for the 10-15% flour component in this recipe, but it’s not “bolted.” I was going to use KABF for the 85% portion. Googled up “bolted” hard flour available locally and ended up with KABF as the first option. Saw some other options available at the grocery that seem to be for lighter, finer pastries, but I thought the idea was to add a heartier flour, not a lighter flour.

Suspect I’m missing something.  Looks like you can order online and I see people bolt their own, but that seems a bit of a pain and not likely to achieve the 80% level of bran removal.

Suggestions on readily available brands?

Bolted just means that it is a high extraction flour, which means that some of the bran has been sifted out. Most whole wheat flour that you find in stores has been sifted/bolted. You wrote fresh mulled, did you mean fresh milled? If you have fresh milled you can use a #40 screen to obtain 85% extraction flour.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: [email protected] on February 10, 2021, 11:36:18 AM
Bolted just means that it is a high extraction flour, which means that some of the bran has been sifted out. Most whole wheat flour that you find in stores has been sifted/bolted. You wrote fresh mulled, did you mean fresh milled? If you have fresh milled you can use a #40 screen to obtain 85% extraction flour.

I had excerpted from Bakeshack’s recipe, but assumed he meant “milled” as well. Consequently, I bought Bob’s Red Mill, but they make it a point of saying “nothing removed” so definitely not what I was after. Will swap it for something appropriate or round up a proper screen. #40 looks a bit finer than what I have available.

Thanks for the help, Hans. Been making pizza at home a long time, but a few days reading around here has really been an education, wow!
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: HansB on February 10, 2021, 12:51:51 PM
You're welcome. Breadtopia has a lot of good things! https://breadtopia.com/product-category/bread-baking-supplies/flour-sifters/
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: [email protected] on February 10, 2021, 04:11:31 PM
Pizza_Not_War mentioned them also. Browsed a little, lots to choose from. Probably just grab some run of the mill whole wheat to give this one a shot and go from there.

A bit like a kid in a candy store with all the recipe options available here.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: TheSicialianSq on February 10, 2021, 11:57:57 PM
What kind of cheese would be ideal for this and the sauce formula?
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: HBSound on February 11, 2021, 10:10:35 PM
Some great information I'm using Sunday to make my first pizza, and I receive some great information.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: [email protected] on February 13, 2021, 10:43:19 AM
Went ahead and gave the mix a go with just KA bread flour I had on hand. Damn tasty, but already planning a proper batch with flour from a “local” mill just discovered because of the recipe. Love synergy.

Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: dbgtr on February 14, 2021, 03:12:21 PM
So I did a test with Coarse Kosher and tried to get it to about the level he has in the video using the same container he used and it came to 839g. If someone has the same container and has some fine salt perhaps we could get a range. If he was using 50# of flour and Coarse Kosher salt he would be in the 3.7% range. Obviously there would be differences based on humidity and salt type but we could at least define a potential range.

The question I have for you are you using Crystal or Morton's kosher salt in this measurement? Crystal is less dense than Morton's by almost half.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: [email protected] on February 15, 2021, 10:21:18 PM
Baked another of same batch tonight, this time on my 16” stone.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: dbgtr on February 28, 2021, 08:04:22 AM
I played around with a Scarr’s style dough a few weeks ago as I wanted to do a side by side with my current/preferred dough formula and I think it came out pretty close.  Here is the formula/workflow I used if it would help you out. 

90% Bread flour (I used Central Milling/Power flour even mix)
10% Whole wheat (fresh mulled)
64% Water
3% olive oil
4% salt
0.8% Fresh yeast

24 hr cold bulk ferment, divide and ball, CF until needed or leave out 4 hrs at RT if using that day.  Bake at 550F deck temp for 5 mins.  I used Bianco crushed, grande mozz, oregano, parm, olive oil.

Dough weight is 775g for a 19” pie post bake.   

Hope this helps! 

Marlon

Marlon, what was your thickness factor for this formulation?

David
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: Jon in Albany on March 01, 2021, 08:53:31 AM
Marlon, what was your thickness factor for this formulation?

David

David-

Thickness factor = dough weight in ounces / area in square inches, so if I did the numbers right:

775 grams is 27.3373 ounces

Area of 19" pizza = pi*9.5*9.5 = 283.5287 square inches

TF = 27.3373/283.5287 = 0.096

Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: Dasnyde4 on March 05, 2021, 11:14:46 AM
I played around with a Scarr’s style dough a few weeks ago as I wanted to do a side by side with my current/preferred dough formula and I think it came out pretty close.  Here is the formula/workflow I used if it would help you out. 

90% Bread flour (I used Central Milling/Power flour even mix)
10% Whole wheat (fresh mulled)
64% Water
3% olive oil
4% salt
0.8% Fresh yeast

24 hr cold bulk ferment, divide and ball, CF until needed or leave out 4 hrs at RT if using that day.  Bake at 550F deck temp for 5 mins.  I used Bianco crushed, grande mozz, oregano, parm, olive oil.

Dough weight is 775g for a 19” pie post bake.   

Hope this helps! 

Marlon

What would be the conversion to instant yeast?  By going to instant yeast would it change the taste of the pizza dramatically?
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: [email protected] on March 05, 2021, 02:00:46 PM
What would be the conversion to instant yeast?  By going to instant yeast would it change the taste of the pizza dramatically?

Per King Arthur: To convert from fresh yeast to active dry yeast, multiply the fresh quantity by 0.4. Active dry yeast must be hydrated in warm water before being incorporated into a dough. To convert from fresh yeast to instant dry yeast, multiply the fresh quantity by 0.33.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: 02ebz06 on March 05, 2021, 02:24:23 PM
I've found this Yeast Conversion table useful  -->  http://www.theartisan.net/convert_yeast_two.htm
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: Dasnyde4 on March 05, 2021, 02:56:32 PM
Thanks!  I want to try this, but curious on how the flavor would be impacted by moving to instant vs Fresh
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: HansB on March 05, 2021, 03:37:11 PM
Thanks!  I want to try this, but curious on how the flavor would be impacted by moving to instant vs Fresh

No difference in flavor. Both are the same strain, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: stevenfstein on March 12, 2021, 12:07:42 PM
Made this the other night and used 85% all trumps and 15% semolina (didn't have any bolted) and my wife thought it was a great crust. If I were to use this recipe but also wanted to use a poolish, how much of the flour/water/yeast would I use and would it make any difference instead of a 72 hour CF.

Best... Steve
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: RHawthorne on March 13, 2021, 09:57:27 PM
Made this the other night and used 85% all trumps and 15% semolina (didn't have any bolted) and my wife thought it was a great crust. If I were to use this recipe but also wanted to use a poolish, how much of the flour/water/yeast would I use and would it make any difference instead of a 72 hour CF.

Best... Steve
You made what the other night?
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: stevenfstein on March 14, 2021, 08:47:32 AM
Sorry, should have been more clear.
62% hydration
2.75% salt
2% evoo
2% sugar
.30% idy
2% diastatic malt powder
85% all trumps, 15% semolina

Thin sliced yukon gold potatoes (pre baked)
broccoli rabe/garlic
grande east coast and some cheddar and a sprinkling of fresh grated parm

Would like to use the dough recipe again but try with a poolish.

Best... Steve
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: HansB on March 14, 2021, 09:27:48 AM
Sorry, should have been more clear.
62% hydration
2.75% salt
2% evoo
2% sugar
.30% idy
2% diastatic malt powder
85% all trumps, 15% semolina

Thin sliced yukon gold potatoes (pre baked)
broccoli rabe/garlic
grande east coast and some cheddar and a sprinkling of fresh grated parm

Would like to use the dough recipe again but try with a poolish.

Best... Steve

Are you trying to recreate Scarr's? I haven't read anywhere that he uses semolina?
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: stevenfstein on March 14, 2021, 10:26:02 AM
he doesn't, didn't have bolted hard wheat but figured I'd try the semolina and the crust worked very nicely. I guess not technically a Scarrs dough but back to the original question, given this recipe, what percentage of the alltrumps and IDY would I use for a poolish?

Thanks... Steve
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: HansB on March 14, 2021, 11:54:01 AM
he doesn't, didn't have bolted hard wheat but figured I'd try the semolina and the crust worked very nicely. I guess not technically a Scarrs dough but back to the original question, given this recipe, what percentage of the alltrumps and IDY would I use for a poolish?

Thanks... Steve

30% of your flour an equal amount of water and just a pinch of IDY is fairly standard and is what I use.
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: piesofsatan on April 02, 2021, 12:06:32 PM
Only a 'clone' in toppings really, but made a pie inspired by Scarr's "Hot Boi" pie last night. Came out great, definitely going to make it again!
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: bschenk8 on April 09, 2021, 02:56:05 PM
Only a 'clone' in toppings really, but made a pie inspired by Scarr's "Hot Boi" pie last night. Came out great, definitely going to make it again!


WOW that looks incredible. Did you use a recipe or make your own?
Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: [email protected] on June 08, 2021, 10:18:23 AM
So after my earlier sad attempt at the Scarr’s dough, I switched to bakeshack’s recipe on page one.

Used Member’s Mark Bread and Pizza flour from Sam’s Club (surprised to find it’s milled right in town) and a 50/50 mix of whole wheat and white whole wheat from Kroger. Keep forgetting to buy fresh yeast, so used IDY. Bulk ferment on counter about 4-5 hours before balling and CF. Think I used first one on Day 3 and it was very nice, but two lingered a bit longer in fridge and baked at 7 days. They were looking a bit past prime, sagging at little on top, but remembered reading the old cold dough thread and so used after about an hour at room temperature while they were still fairly cool in my hands.

Truly the most wonderful dough I ever stretched. Very liquid, extensible and strong. Showed no sign of thinning even though I stretched it pretty far and thin. First time I was ever tempted to spin one in the air, but late and hungry so wasn’t risking it  :P Flavor of the dough was incredible.

 

Title: Re: re-creating Scarr's pizza
Post by: Georgev on June 15, 2021, 09:06:50 AM
Only a 'clone' in toppings really, but made a pie inspired by Scarr's "Hot Boi" pie last night. Came out great, definitely going to make it again!
Wow this looks incredible. Please do share your dough recipe