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Author Topic: Is polished concrete a suitable surface for opening dough?  (Read 1833 times)

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Offline JohnnyQuest86

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Is polished concrete a suitable surface for opening dough?
« on: December 13, 2015, 11:57:24 AM »
I am opening a small pizzeria making neo/new york hybrid style pizza cooking at about 700 Deg. The cooking area is a focal point of the restaurant and I am trying to figure out a good surface for opening up skins. The bar top is going to be done in polished concrete and I was wondering if this would be an acceptable surface for the dough opening area. From my research it seems that there are a host of surfaces that will work from wood to stainless to stone. I haven't been able to find but a handful of comments about concrete. I could put in quartz, but it would be pricier than concrete tops and wouldn't fit the decor quite as well. Any thoughts?

-Jake 

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Is polished concrete a suitable surface for opening dough?
« Reply #1 on: December 13, 2015, 12:55:46 PM »
My gut feeling is that it would be fine.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
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Offline dough_boy

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Re: Is polished concrete a suitable surface for opening dough?
« Reply #2 on: December 13, 2015, 01:12:19 PM »
I thought most commercial polished concrete tops were sealed with chemicals unsafe for food prep...

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Is polished concrete a suitable surface for opening dough?
« Reply #3 on: December 13, 2015, 01:21:10 PM »
When you're doing it at home for your family anything does, but when you add the word "commercial" to the equation it all changes as there are now specific rules, regulations and laws that you must abide by. At the risk of repeating myself, this is something that you need to discuss with your local health inspector. If they approve of it, great, it they don't, better to find out now rather than later when they won't issue a certificate until you get it replaced.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Dcotor

Offline GotRocks

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Re: Is polished concrete a suitable surface for opening dough?
« Reply #4 on: December 13, 2015, 02:29:31 PM »
If it is covered with a food-grade (Keyword; FOOD-GRADE) sealant, that is durable, does not flake off,  is easily cleanable, and most important that it is approved by your inspector and zoning. (agreeing with Tom on this) You should be okay.
My biggest concerns would be the durability of that surface, and it developing fissures in it, or pieces chipping off through normal usage and cleaning procedures.

If that surface is not acceptable by your health department, maybe consider getting a slab of polished granite to work on that can be inlaid, or placed on top of that concrete surface for stretching.
We have granite countertops here, they are almost magical for stretching dough, and very very durable. My monkeys have not chipped them yet, although they have broken off a few corners on the upright backsplash.

Bare hardwoods also have a great reputation as being very sanitary, but I would not want to try to stretch dough on a surface that is not slippery and that can also absorb water.
Once you seal hardwoods, bacteria can propagate rapidly like they do on plastics and other cutting board materials commonly in use whereas hardwoods tend to kill most harmful bacteria that come in contact with it.
(I can cite a University study to back up my hardwood claims if so requested)
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Offline stonecutter

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Re: Is polished concrete a suitable surface for opening dough?
« Reply #5 on: December 13, 2015, 08:26:46 PM »
I am opening a small pizzeria making neo/new york hybrid style pizza cooking at about 700 Deg. The cooking area is a focal point of the restaurant and I am trying to figure out a good surface for opening up skins. The bar top is going to be done in polished concrete and I was wondering if this would be an acceptable surface for the dough opening area. From my research it seems that there are a host of surfaces that will work from wood to stainless to stone. I haven't been able to find but a handful of comments about concrete. I could put in quartz, but it would be pricier than concrete tops and wouldn't fit the decor quite as well. Any thoughts?

-Jake

I've worked with and fabricated specialty concrete products for counters and such.   The biggest potential issue is what type of sealer is being used on the surface. Every other potential issue can happen  with natural material like stone or wood.
Why not imbed a stone slab within the counter where you open your dough...it would look cool too.
When we build, let us think that we build forever.
John Ruskin

Offline starcmr

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Re: Is polished concrete a suitable surface for opening dough?
« Reply #6 on: November 04, 2022, 01:49:20 PM »
If it is covered with a food-grade (Keyword; FOOD-GRADE) sealant, that is durable, does not flake off,  is easily cleanable, and most important that it is approved by your inspector and zoning polished concrete boston. (agreeing with Tom on this) You should be okay.
My biggest concerns would be the durability of that surface, and it developing fissures in it, or pieces chipping off through normal usage and cleaning procedures.

If that surface is not acceptable by your health department, maybe consider getting a slab of polished granite to work on that can be inlaid, or placed on top of that concrete surface for stretching.
We have granite countertops here, they are almost magical for stretching dough, and very very durable. My monkeys have not chipped them yet, although they have broken off a few corners on the upright backsplash.

Bare hardwoods also have a great reputation as being very sanitary, but I would not want to try to stretch dough on a surface that is not slippery and that can also absorb water.
Once you seal hardwoods, bacteria can propagate rapidly like they do on plastics and other cutting board materials commonly in use whereas hardwoods tend to kill most harmful bacteria that come in contact with it.
(I can cite a University study to back up my hardwood claims if so requested)
Which is the best surface for preparing bread/pizza dough and also conforms with health regs, thnk you

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